Discussion:
Bob Dylan wins Nobel prize in Literature
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Raymond Hall
2016-10-13 16:07:30 UTC
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http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/14/arts/music/bob-dylan-nobel-prize-literature.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=photo-spot-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=0

There are bound to be some comments, but as a Dylan fan for musical merit (I possess most of his output), this award comes as a mild shock.

Ray Hall, Taree
HT
2016-10-13 16:33:17 UTC
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It's a trend. In the arts. Everything can be anything. Dylan as literator. Bocelli as opera singer. Borstlap as classical pianist. I won't even mention the visual arts. <g>

Henk
c***@gmail.com
2016-10-13 17:04:53 UTC
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Post by Raymond Hall
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/14/arts/music/bob-dylan-nobel-prize-literature.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=photo-spot-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=0
There are bound to be some comments, but as a Dylan fan for musical merit (I possess most of his output), this award comes as a mild shock.
Ray Hall, Taree
Forgive us. My knee-jerk reaction anyway is that it's wrong. If they had changed the prize to "Nobel Prize in Literature and the Arts" - which I'd be all for - then absolutely, but Dylan will be remembered for his contributions to music and not to literature. I think giving him the prize feels a bit like when the Chopin competition declines to award its gold medal. "We've heard all of you and you suck, so we're gonna do like this instead".

/C
g***@gmail.com
2016-10-13 19:35:03 UTC
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Post by Raymond Hall
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/14/arts/music/bob-dylan-nobel-prize-literature.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=photo-spot-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=0
There are bound to be some comments, but as a Dylan fan for musical merit (I possess most of his output), this award comes as a mild shock.
Ray Hall, Taree
Forgive us. My knee-jerk reaction anyway is that it's wrong. If they had changed the prize to "Nobel Prize in Literature and the Arts" - which I'd be all for - then absolutely, but Dylan will be remembered for his contributions to music and not to literature...
I agree. For those who doubt his abilities as a composer, try listening to the following album:

Loading Image...
Al Eisner
2016-10-13 22:15:02 UTC
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Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Raymond Hall
There are bound to be some comments, but as a Dylan fan for musical merit
(I possess most of his output), this award comes as a mild shock.
Ray Hall, Taree
Forgive us. My knee-jerk reaction anyway is that it's wrong. If they
had changed the prize to "Nobel Prize in Literature and the Arts" -
which I'd be all for - then absolutely, but Dylan will be remembered
for his contributions to music and not to literature. I think giving
him the prize feels a bit like when the Chopin competition declines to
award its gold medal. "We've heard all of you and you suck, so we're
gonna do like this instead".
"Literature" is a stretch, but not all that unreasonable. For a
constructive take on this (with which some will no doubt disagree), see
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/14/books/bob-dylan-on-the-page-poetry-and-prose-to-match-any-american-writer.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=photo-spot-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news

I don't get your analogy. Surely there are other worthy competitors for
a lifetime achievement award like this, whereas I think it can be quite
justifiable to decline to award a gold medal for a particular set of
performances.

Now, if there were a lifetime achivement ("Nobel") award for classical
music competition, what living composer should get it?
--
Al Eisner
c***@gmail.com
2016-10-14 06:39:06 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
Now, if there were a lifetime achivement ("Nobel") award for classical
music competition, what living composer should get it?
Frederic Rzewski. Pär Lund and Carl Vine are two others which spring to mind.

/C
number_six
2016-10-15 21:40:00 UTC
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Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by Al Eisner
Now, if there were a lifetime achivement ("Nobel") award for classical
music competition, what living composer should get it?
Frederic Rzewski. Pär Lund and Carl Vine are two others which spring to mind.
/C
My nominees are Morricone, Part, and Penderecki.

For a lit prize awarded posthumously (which they don't do), Borges.

Now if a prize could be revoked...
Oscar
2016-10-16 00:42:14 UTC
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If a prize could be revoked... Well, no question, Arafat and Obama would be first in line. And lest we forget Antonio Egas Moniz, the butcher behind the icepick lobotomy "invention" and winner of the 1949 Prize in Medicine.
number_six
2016-10-16 16:37:38 UTC
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Post by Oscar
If a prize could be revoked... Well, no question, Arafat and Obama would be first in line. And lest we forget Antonio Egas Moniz, the butcher behind the icepick lobotomy "invention" and winner of the 1949 Prize in Medicine.
I was not familiar with the not-so-good doctor.

But yes, Arafat tops the list.

President Obama's award won't be revoked, but it has certainly been overtaken by events. The Committee were in *way* too much of a hurry, as was clear even without hindsight.
graham
2016-10-16 17:49:22 UTC
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Post by number_six
President Obama's award won't be revoked, but it has certainly been overtaken by events. The Committee were in *way* too much of a hurry, as was clear even without hindsight.
As they were with Ma Theresa!
Bob Harper
2016-10-17 23:45:13 UTC
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Post by graham
Post by number_six
President Obama's award won't be revoked, but it has certainly been
overtaken by events. The Committee were in *way* too much of a hurry,
as was clear even without hindsight.
As they were with Ma Theresa!
St. Theresa of Calcutta ennobled the Peace Prize, not the other way around.

Bob Harper
weary flake
2016-10-17 17:51:40 UTC
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Post by Oscar
If a prize could be revoked... Well, no question, Arafat and Obama
would be first in line. And lest we forget Antonio Egas Moniz, the
butcher behind the icepick lobotomy "invention" and winner of the 1949
Prize in Medicine.
Moniz was awarded the Nobel Prize for the surgery of
lobotomy, also called prefontal lobotomy, but the icepick,
or transorbital lobotomy, was invented by Walter Freeman who
used to travel in his hippie bus around America performing
transorbital lobotomies at stops at hospitals. So while
Dylan was "hammering out" unfunny beatnik poetry in his
songs a "head doctor" was "on the road" beating icepicks
through eyesockets to "spread good cheer".
Oscar
2016-10-16 00:45:03 UTC
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Sign the petition to revoke Obama's Nobel Peace Prize.


http://act.rootsaction.org/p/dia/action/public/?action_KEY=7647

<< After receiving the 2009 Nobel Peace Prize, President Obama has made perpetual war look more perpetual than ever.

Today, there are more U.S. troops in Afghanistan than when Obama took office. His increasing intervention in Syria promises the loss of even more than the nearly 100,000 lives already needlessly sacrificed. His intervention in Libya cost thousands of lives while destabilizing the entire region. His presidency has widened the use of drones and other instruments of remote killing without limit to almost any place on the globe.

Please sign this petition to the Norwegian Nobel Committee:

GOAL: 40,000
CURRENT: 28,341 >>
dk
2016-10-16 08:10:03 UTC
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Post by Oscar
Sign the petition to revoke Obama's Nobel Peace Prize.
Fighting windmills?

dk
g***@gmail.com
2016-10-19 00:48:38 UTC
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Post by Oscar
Sign the petition to revoke Obama's Nobel Peace Prize.
http://act.rootsaction.org/p/dia/action/public/?action_KEY=7647
<< After receiving the 2009 Nobel Peace Prize, President Obama has made perpetual war look more perpetual than ever.
Today, there are more U.S. troops in Afghanistan than when Obama took office. His increasing intervention in Syria promises the loss of even more than the nearly 100,000 lives already needlessly sacrificed. His intervention in Libya cost thousands of lives while destabilizing the entire region. His presidency has widened the use of drones and other instruments of remote killing without limit to almost any place on the globe.
GOAL: 40,000
CURRENT: 28,341 >>
According to the following recent article:

- One likely answer is that imperial Washington is totally confused over whom to support and how to do it.

http://ericmargolis.com/2016/10/how-far-are-we-from-war-with-russia-over-syria/
j***@gmail.com
2016-10-19 09:12:19 UTC
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Somebody here said he found Dylan's lyrics "threadbare". Maybe that is a result of their being plucked at by various interpreters over fifty years.
Herman
2016-10-13 17:28:30 UTC
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Post by Raymond Hall
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/14/arts/music/bob-dylan-nobel-prize-literature.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=photo-spot-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=0
There are bound to be some comments, but as a Dylan fan for musical merit (I possess most of his output), this award comes as a mild shock.
Ray Hall, Taree
It's a yuge shock to me. It's a massive, monumental middle finger to the entire literary world (of which, of course, the jury is a part, to a degree).

It goes without saying that Bob Dylan is an epochal singer and songwriter, although in my mind that epoch closed about thirty years ago, or more. But he does not write poetry. He writes songs.

Off the top of my head I can name dozens of poets who deserve the Nobel, after working for decades on their craft and mining their vision. To name one from the US, Louise Gluck.

And there were rumors that the Albanian novelist Ismael Kadare was close, and some people are still thinking Philip Roth has a shot.

All these writers, and many more who will never ever get close to international prizes, but do belong to the literary food chain, have now been told a guy who plays his songs to stadiums and has an alleged net worth of 75 million dollar needs the prize more.
Tony
2016-10-13 18:16:00 UTC
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Post by Herman
To name one from the US, Louise Gluck.
I bought and read her complete works while in Amsterdam. NTIMA (Not that it means anything), but I wouldn't anticipate her receiving that award. She didn't change my life. Of course IGYP (I get your point).

It's silly to award the highest prize in literature to a singer who wrote lyrics (no idea what they're like). His time seems a part of history already (as in it isn't really happening now). OTOH isn't this the same syndicate that gave Obama a peace award for doing nothing?
Norman Schwartz
2016-10-13 19:04:43 UTC
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Post by Tony
Post by Herman
To name one from the US, Louise Gluck.
I bought and read her complete works while in Amsterdam. NTIMA (Not
that it means anything), but I wouldn't anticipate her receiving that
award. She didn't change my life. Of course IGYP (I get your point).
It's silly to award the highest prize in literature to a singer who
wrote lyrics (no idea what they're like). His time seems a part of
history already (as in it isn't really happening now). OTOH isn't
this the same syndicate that gave Obama a peace award for doing
nothing?
Unlike the syndicate's prizes in areas related to the 'humanties', those in
fields such as Physics, Chemistry, Physiology and Medicine are not awaded
for "doing nothing".
c***@gmail.com
2016-10-13 19:07:37 UTC
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Post by Tony
Post by Herman
To name one from the US, Louise Gluck.
I bought and read her complete works while in Amsterdam. NTIMA (Not that it means anything), but I wouldn't anticipate her receiving that award. She didn't change my life. Of course IGYP (I get your point).
It's silly to award the highest prize in literature to a singer who wrote lyrics (no idea what they're like). His time seems a part of history already (as in it isn't really happening now). OTOH isn't this the same syndicate that gave Obama a peace award for doing nothing?
Nope. Those chipmunks sit in Norway and have already had their fun this year (Santos, for failing to bring peace in Colombia). Sweden and Norway were in a union in Alfred Nobel's time, which is why the peace prize is handled by Norway. Sweden does the science and literature awards.
weary flake
2016-10-13 19:15:07 UTC
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Post by Tony
Post by Herman
To name one from the US, Louise Gluck.
I bought and read her complete works while in Amsterdam. NTIMA (Not
that it means anything), but I wouldn't anticipate her receiving that
award. She didn't change my life. Of course IGYP (I get your point).
It's silly to award the highest prize in literature to a singer who
wrote lyrics (no idea what they're like). His time seems a part of
history already (as in it isn't really happening now). OTOH isn't this
the same syndicate that gave Obama a peace award for doing nothing?
The Rolling Stones wrote far better literature than Dylan!
dk
2016-10-13 21:12:07 UTC
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Post by weary flake
Post by Tony
Post by Herman
To name one from the US, Louise Gluck.
I bought and read her complete works while in Amsterdam. NTIMA (Not
that it means anything), but I wouldn't anticipate her receiving that
award. She didn't change my life. Of course IGYP (I get your point).
It's silly to award the highest prize in literature to a singer who
wrote lyrics (no idea what they're like). His time seems a part of
history already (as in it isn't really happening now). OTOH isn't this
the same syndicate that gave Obama a peace award for doing nothing?
The Rolling Stones wrote far better literature than Dylan!
I'd vote for Jethro Tull! ;-)

dk
Oscar
2016-10-13 22:00:34 UTC
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I'm working Desert Trip in Indio, Calif. (again). I'll be seeing the Nobel Prize winner tomorrow. Last week he opened with Masters of War.

Friday
The Rolling Stones
Bob Dylan

Saturday
Paul McCartney
Neil Young

Sunday
Roger Waters
The Who
Frank Berger
2016-10-13 23:14:55 UTC
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Post by Oscar
I'm working Desert Trip in Indio, Calif. (again). I'll be seeing the Nobel Prize winner tomorrow. Last week he opened with Masters of War.
Friday
The Rolling Stones
Bob Dylan
Saturday
Paul McCartney
Neil Young
Sunday
Roger Waters
The Who
Tell Waters to lay off Israel.

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
Oscar
2016-10-13 22:10:43 UTC
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herman, the times they are a-changin. You don't need to do a doggone thing to win the favor of the Nobel Prize committee. If they get an itch they'll scratch it. A certain leader of the free world won the Peace thing after fewer than 9 months in office and 0 substantial changes to U.S. foreign policy other than a trumped-up "reset" with Russia. Missiles were sent into the sovereign nation of Yemen just yesterday. So, go Bob Dylan! Personally, I was hoping Kitty Kelly would take the Lit pick. Her 1991 Nancy Reagan biography was dynamite.
Terry
2016-10-13 22:44:59 UTC
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Post by weary flake
Post by Tony
Post by Herman
To name one from the US, Louise Gluck.
I bought and read her complete works while in Amsterdam. NTIMA (Not
that it means anything), but I wouldn't anticipate her receiving that
award. She didn't change my life. Of course IGYP (I get your point).
It's silly to award the highest prize in literature to a singer who
wrote lyrics (no idea what they're like). His time seems a part of
history already (as in it isn't really happening now). OTOH isn't this
the same syndicate that gave Obama a peace award for doing nothing?
The Rolling Stones wrote far better literature than Dylan!
I think that, too. But without the music, the poetry of both Dylan and the Stones is pretty threadbare. Baffling decision!
g***@gmail.com
2016-10-14 06:50:01 UTC
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Post by weary flake
Post by Tony
Post by Herman
To name one from the US, Louise Gluck.
I bought and read her complete works while in Amsterdam. NTIMA (Not
that it means anything), but I wouldn't anticipate her receiving that
award. She didn't change my life. Of course IGYP (I get your point).
It's silly to award the highest prize in literature to a singer who
wrote lyrics (no idea what they're like). His time seems a part of
history already (as in it isn't really happening now). OTOH isn't this
the same syndicate that gave Obama a peace award for doing nothing?
The Rolling Stones wrote far better literature than Dylan!
If anyone doubts that the time are a-changin', the book EXPERIENCING THE ROLLING STONES: A LISTENERS COMPANION came out earlier this year:

https://rowman.com/ISBN/9780810889194/Experiencing-the-Rolling-Stones-A-Listeners-Companion#
g***@gmail.com
2016-10-14 06:51:22 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by weary flake
Post by Tony
Post by Herman
To name one from the US, Louise Gluck.
I bought and read her complete works while in Amsterdam. NTIMA (Not
that it means anything), but I wouldn't anticipate her receiving that
award. She didn't change my life. Of course IGYP (I get your point).
It's silly to award the highest prize in literature to a singer who
wrote lyrics (no idea what they're like). His time seems a part of
history already (as in it isn't really happening now). OTOH isn't this
the same syndicate that gave Obama a peace award for doing nothing?
The Rolling Stones wrote far better literature than Dylan!
https://rowman.com/ISBN/9780810889194/Experiencing-the-Rolling-Stones-A-Listeners-Companion#
Doesn't that prove that in these times, NOTHING is un-analyzable?
Herman
2016-10-14 07:25:44 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
If anyone doubts that the time are a-changin',
When I was a teenager "The ti i i i mes they are a-changing" of course made an impression on me.

However. as a grownup it's nothing more than a yuge cliche. The times have always been changing and only a very young person would think this is a tremendous insight.

Pop music is about letting your inner teenager speak, and that's healthy. Heretofore Nobel Prizes were about something more mature.
Raymond Hall
2016-10-14 08:06:15 UTC
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Post by Herman
Post by g***@gmail.com
If anyone doubts that the time are a-changin',
When I was a teenager "The ti i i i mes they are a-changing" of course made an impression on me.
However. as a grownup it's nothing more than a yuge cliche. The times have always been changing and only a very young person would think this is a tremendous insight.
Pop music is about letting your inner teenager speak, and that's healthy. Heretofore Nobel Prizes were about something more mature.
Very true.

Dylan came along at the right point in his history. Strangely, his early stuff never really wowed me, Hendrix was more important to me at the time. Dylan's early songs sound very dated to me now, and I prefer his slightly later albums like Nashville Skyline, Blood on The Tracks, and later albums with a more augmented backing, such as Time Out of Mind.

Ray Hall, Taree
Bozo
2016-10-16 14:02:50 UTC
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Pop music is about letting your inner teenager speak, and that's healthy. Heretofore Nobel Prizes were >about something more mature.
Dylan came along at the right point in his history. Strangely, his early stuff never really wowed me, >Hendrix >was more important to me at the time. Dylan's early songs sound very dated to me now...
From " Tambourine Man " still insightful to the present angst :

"Take me disappearing through the smoke rings of my mind
Down the foggy ruins of time
Far past the frozen leaves
The haunted frightened trees
Out to the windy bench
Far from the twisted reach of crazy sorrow
Yes, to dance beneath the diamond sky
With one hand waving free
Silhouetted by the sea
Circled by the circus sands
With all memory and fate
Driven deep beneath the waves
Let me forget about today until tomorrow."
j***@gmail.com
2016-10-19 09:24:58 UTC
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I agree. Of their time, like Cole Porter's lyrics, but not dated. Somebody here said he found Dylan's lyrics "threadbare". If so, maybe that is a result of their fabric being pulled around and plucked at for fifty years.
g***@gmail.com
2016-10-14 09:50:23 UTC
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Post by Herman
Post by g***@gmail.com
If anyone doubts that the time are a-changin',
When I was a teenager "The ti i i i mes they are a-changing" of course made an impression on me.
However. as a grownup it's nothing more than a yuge cliche. The times have always been changing and only a very young person would think this is a tremendous insight.
Pop music is about letting your inner teenager speak, and that's healthy. Heretofore Nobel Prizes were about something more mature.
To paraphrase a Dylan song:

- Why can't God be on OUR side FOR ONCE?
g***@gmail.com
2016-10-14 10:09:51 UTC
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Post by Herman
Post by g***@gmail.com
If anyone doubts that the time are a-changin',
When I was a teenager "The ti i i i mes they are a-changing" of course made an impression on me.
However. as a grownup it's nothing more than a yuge cliche. The times have always been changing and only a very young person would think this is a tremendous insight.
Pop music is about letting your inner teenager speak, and that's healthy. Heretofore Nobel Prizes were about something more mature.
The following article begins:

- Adult culture is waning in America...

http://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/are-video-games-the-new-novels/
j***@gmail.com
2016-10-14 11:21:02 UTC
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John Corigliano set the words of seven Dylan songs to his own music w/o, so he has astonishingly said, ever having heard the original music. He regarded them strictly as beautiful "poetry" texts, i.e., literature. Whether they are good enough to get a literature Nobel is another matter. But I don't see any reason why song lyrics cannot be literature. Some of the songs in "As You Like It" stand with anything else in the play. Maybe we will know down the line whether the Nobel committee was right. Surely, they are trying to expand what most of us consider to be literature.
Herman
2016-10-14 15:01:02 UTC
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Post by j***@gmail.com
Maybe we will know down the line whether the Nobel committee was right.
Eh, how?
Post by j***@gmail.com
Surely, they are trying to expand what most of us consider to be literature.
By demonstrating, like one critic of this award said, that reading books is just too hard, these days?
g***@gmail.com
2016-10-14 17:14:39 UTC
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Post by Herman
Post by j***@gmail.com
Maybe we will know down the line whether the Nobel committee was right.
Eh, how?
Post by j***@gmail.com
Surely, they are trying to expand what most of us consider to be literature.
By demonstrating, like one critic of this award said, that reading books is just too hard, these days?
According to this 2000 article:

- The publishing industry's health goes in line with the reading habits of the public, and people are reading 2 to 3 percent less every year. The way to success in this business these days is in writing easy-to-read books, with short sentences, lots of slang and easy plots.

https://www.nytimes.com/books/00/12/10/bookend/bookend.html
j***@gmail.com
2016-10-14 19:42:04 UTC
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Post by Herman
Post by j***@gmail.com
Maybe we will know down the line whether the Nobel committee was right.
Eh, how?
Post by j***@gmail.com
Surely, they are trying to expand what most of us consider to be literature.
By demonstrating, like one critic of this award said, that reading books is just too hard, these days?
The same way one did with Toni Morrison, by reading her novels. As for Dylan, reading his words is "hard": his lyrics display a rich moral imagination and a complex allusive style. Christopher Ricks (Dylan's Visions of Sin) has made that case for Dylan. Right or wrong, at least he doesn't stoop to ridicule.
h***@gmail.com
2016-10-15 01:52:31 UTC
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Post by j***@gmail.com
Post by Herman
Post by j***@gmail.com
Maybe we will know down the line whether the Nobel committee was right.
Eh, how?
Post by j***@gmail.com
Surely, they are trying to expand what most of us consider to be literature.
By demonstrating, like one critic of this award said, that reading books is just too hard, these days?
The same way one did with Toni Morrison, by reading her novels. As for Dylan, reading his words is "hard": his lyrics display a rich moral imagination and a complex allusive style. Christopher Ricks (Dylan's Visions of Sin) has made that case for Dylan. Right or wrong, at least he doesn't stoop to ridicule.
Dylan seems a reasonable choice...no luck for Joyce Carol Oates who would be controversial in another way.
dk
2016-10-15 02:09:19 UTC
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Post by h***@gmail.com
Dylan seems a reasonable choice...no luck for Joyce
Carol Oates who would be controversial in another way.
How?

dk
h***@gmail.com
2016-10-16 00:47:34 UTC
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Post by h***@gmail.com
Dylan seems a reasonable choice...no luck for Joyce
Carol Oates who would be controversial in another way.
How?
dk
Some critics find her overly prolific arguing that not all her work is at a prize winning level. If it comes easily to her, well...can't be that good. More than a little envy I'd say.

HV
dk
2016-10-16 08:09:08 UTC
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Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by h***@gmail.com
Dylan seems a reasonable choice...no luck for Joyce
Carol Oates who would be controversial in another way.
How?
Some critics find her overly prolific arguing that not all
her work is at a prize winning level. If it comes easily to
her, well...can't be that good. More than a little envy I'd say.
Thanks.

dk
g***@gmail.com
2016-10-19 21:49:22 UTC
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Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by j***@gmail.com
Post by Herman
Post by j***@gmail.com
Maybe we will know down the line whether the Nobel committee was right.
Eh, how?
Post by j***@gmail.com
Surely, they are trying to expand what most of us consider to be literature.
By demonstrating, like one critic of this award said, that reading books is just too hard, these days?
The same way one did with Toni Morrison, by reading her novels. As for Dylan, reading his words is "hard": his lyrics display a rich moral imagination and a complex allusive style. Christopher Ricks (Dylan's Visions of Sin) has made that case for Dylan. Right or wrong, at least he doesn't stoop to ridicule.
Dylan seems a reasonable choice...no luck for Joyce Carol Oates who would be controversial in another way.
Her response to Dylan's award:

- American author Joyce Carol Oates even managed, aptly given Dylan classics such as Master of War, to inject a political note into her tweet of praise: "Bob Dylan a very welcome respite/ interregnum interrupting cascade of T***p grotesquerie. the Dylan of 1960s would've been scathing of T***p", she wrote, intentionally leaving the "rum" out of her target's name.

http://www.straitstimes.com/world/writers-all-stirred-up-over-dylans-nobel-prize
g***@gmail.com
2016-10-23 23:06:56 UTC
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Post by Herman
Post by g***@gmail.com
If anyone doubts that the time are a-changin',
When I was a teenager "The ti i i i mes they are a-changing" of course made an impression on me.
However. as a grownup it's nothing more than a yuge cliche. The times have always been changing and only a very young person would think this is a tremendous insight.
Pop music is about letting your inner teenager speak, and that's healthy. Heretofore Nobel Prizes were about something more mature.
Aren't you glad you aren't an English teacher? (recent article):

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/columnists/ct-bob-dylan-literature-nobel-20161021-story.html
g***@gmail.com
2016-10-27 08:43:23 UTC
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Post by Herman
Post by g***@gmail.com
If anyone doubts that the time are a-changin',
When I was a teenager "The ti i i i mes they are a-changing" of course made an impression on me.
However. as a grownup it's nothing more than a yuge cliche. The times have always been changing and only a very young person would think this is a tremendous insight.
Pop music is about letting your inner teenager speak, and that's healthy. Heretofore Nobel Prizes were about something more mature.
When it comes to maturity, guess what is the most popular tv program on CBS?:

- As for the numbers, The Price is Right isn’t boring anyone even after 45 years of more of the same. In its 2015 – 2016 broadcast year, Price was not only the most popular program for CBS, but it went on record as the most watched program in all of daytime television, raking in average viewings of just under 6 million per episode. Not even the melodramatic soap operas on television or saucy talk shows come close to this game show in terms of watchers, proving that one need not be controversial to be
popular.

http://waitwith.us/the-price-is-right-season-46-14992/

Isn't the Nobel Prize for Literature selection committee in Scandanavia? If one ever thought that Scandinavians were cerebral, Wayne Brady recently announced that the most popular tv program there is LET'S MAKE A DEAL. (And not a local version either which exists in many other foreign countries):

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Price_Is_Right#International_versions

Doesn't that give new meaning to the word GLOBALIZATION?
g***@gmail.com
2016-10-28 05:17:17 UTC
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Post by Herman
Post by g***@gmail.com
If anyone doubts that the time are a-changin',
When I was a teenager "The ti i i i mes they are a-changing" of course made an impression on me.
However. as a grownup it's nothing more than a yuge cliche. The times have always been changing and only a very young person would think this is a tremendous insight.
Pop music is about letting your inner teenager speak, and that's healthy. Heretofore Nobel Prizes were about something more mature.
Concerning maturity, if the leaders of democracy cared about that, wouldn't they ban daytime ty talk shows?

If I ever thought that the people of India were more spiritual than the rest of us, the world's largest democracy televises Ellen Degeneres' tv talk show twice a day.
g***@gmail.com
2016-11-07 22:33:54 UTC
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Post by Herman
Post by g***@gmail.com
If anyone doubts that the time are a-changin',
When I was a teenager "The ti i i i mes they are a-changing" of course made an impression on me.
However. as a grownup it's nothing more than a yuge cliche. The times have always been changing and only a very young person would think this is a tremendous insight.
Pop music is about letting your inner teenager speak, and that's healthy. Heretofore Nobel Prizes were about something more mature.
Don't mature individuals think critically?:

http://historynewsnetwork.org/article/164343
g***@gmail.com
2016-11-09 09:36:40 UTC
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Post by Herman
Post by g***@gmail.com
If anyone doubts that the time are a-changin',
When I was a teenager "The ti i i i mes they are a-changing" of course made an impression on me.
However. as a grownup it's nothing more than a yuge cliche. The times have always been changing and only a very young person would think this is a tremendous insight.
Pop music is about letting your inner teenager speak, and that's healthy. Heretofore Nobel Prizes were about something more mature.
But do leaders want mature citizens?:

- When a candidate for public office faces the voters he does not face men of sense; he faces a mob of men whose chief distinguishing mark is the fact that they are quite incapable of weighing ideas, or even of comprehending any save the most elemental — men whose whole thinking is done in terms of emotion, and whose dominant emotion is dread of what they cannot understand. So confronted, the candidate must either bark with the pack or be lost... All the odds are on the man who is, intrinsically, the most devious and mediocre — the man who can most adeptly disperse the notion that his mind is a virtual vacuum. The Presidency tends, year by year, to go to such men. As democracy is perfected, the office represents, more and more closely, the inner soul of the people. We move toward a lofty ideal. On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last, and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron.

Mencken
g***@gmail.com
2017-05-27 17:59:33 UTC
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Post by Herman
Post by g***@gmail.com
If anyone doubts that the time are a-changin',
When I was a teenager "The ti i i i mes they are a-changing" of course made an impression on me.
However. as a grownup it's nothing more than a yuge cliche. The times have always been changing and only a very young person would think this is a tremendous insight.
Pop music is about letting your inner teenager speak, and that's healthy. Heretofore Nobel Prizes were about something more mature.
According to the following:

- ...The social structures within which we live are constructed so as to keep us childish: grownup citizens are more trouble than they’re worth. The state’s desire for control and our own desire for comfort combine to minimise conflict...Those who rule society promote our dependency, cultivating our taste for luxuries to distract us from thinking about the real conditions of our lives...

http://clinicalpsychreading.blogspot.com/2016/04/
Bozo
2017-05-27 19:41:30 UTC
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Per Yogi Berra : "Deja vu , all over again." Plus nostalgia, the opiate of the elderly who can't afford the good stuff.

I still recall my high school buddies and I hearing for the first time Dylan's " Highway 61 Revisited " , the Beatle's " Rubber Soul", and the Zombies "Tell Her No" lp, and being amazed.
Bozo
2017-05-27 21:10:55 UTC
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Per Yogi Berra : "Deja vu , all over again." Plus nostalgia, the opiate of the elderly who can't afford the good >stuff.
And Gregg Allman has died ?!!
Oscar
2017-05-27 21:49:35 UTC
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Gregg Allman has indeed passed away, but shouldn't Hillary supporters and Alinsky-ites be out celebrating the death of a white heterosexual Christian Southern man, long hair or short?

“Gregg Allman had a feeling for the blues very few ever have hard to believe that magnificent voice is stilled forever,” musician Charlie Daniels tweeted Saturday.

Charlie Daniels is a Tr_mp supporter. By the transitive property of equality, you shouldn't be supporting the Devil Went Down to Georgia _or_ Gregg "Some of my best drummers are black" Allman.
Oscar
2017-05-27 21:53:37 UTC
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P.S. The above post was not off-topic. Charlie Daniels was a well-respected, in-demand session in Nashville for years before he signed to Capitol in 1970. He played on Bob Dylan's Nashville Skyline, among others, and employed Jimi Hendrix's bass player and Arny buddy, Billy Cox, after Hebdrix died in September 1970.
Bozo
2017-05-27 22:33:17 UTC
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By the transitive property of equality, you shouldn't be supporting the Devil >Went Down to Georgia _or_ Gregg "Some of my best drummers are black" Allman.
http://liveforlivemusic.com/news/gregg-allman-wrote-a-song-the-day-after-martin-luther-king-jr-was-assassinated-listen/


Oscar
2017-05-27 23:19:29 UTC
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The sarcasm inflected in my post was intended to be obvious and biting.
Bozo
2017-05-28 00:35:15 UTC
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Post by Oscar
The sarcasm inflected in my post was intended to be obvious and biting.
English translation ?
Herman
2017-05-29 11:01:06 UTC
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Post by Oscar
The sarcasm inflected in my post was intended to be obvious and biting.
and what for?
g***@gmail.com
2017-05-29 10:41:02 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by Herman
Post by g***@gmail.com
If anyone doubts that the time are a-changin',
When I was a teenager "The ti i i i mes they are a-changing" of course made an impression on me.
However. as a grownup it's nothing more than a yuge cliche. The times have always been changing and only a very young person would think this is a tremendous insight.
Pop music is about letting your inner teenager speak, and that's healthy. Heretofore Nobel Prizes were about something more mature.
- ...The social structures within which we live are constructed so as to keep us childish: grownup citizens are more trouble than they’re worth. The state’s desire for control and our own desire for comfort combine to minimise conflict...Those who rule society promote our dependency, cultivating our taste for luxuries to distract us from thinking about the real conditions of our lives...
http://clinicalpsychreading.blogspot.com/2016/04/
"The Vanishing American Adult..." (new book):

https://us.macmillan.com/thevanishingamericanadult/bensasse/9781250114402/
Bob Harper
2016-10-14 00:10:08 UTC
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Post by Tony
Post by Herman
To name one from the US, Louise Gluck.
I bought and read her complete works while in Amsterdam. NTIMA (Not
that it means anything), but I wouldn't anticipate her receiving that
award. She didn't change my life. Of course IGYP (I get your point).
It's silly to award the highest prize in literature to a singer who
wrote lyrics (no idea what they're like). His time seems a part of
history already (as in it isn't really happening now). OTOH isn't
this the same syndicate that gave Obama a peace award for doing
nothing?
Actually, the Peace Prize is given by the Norwegian Nobel Committee. And
they've done it again this year, having given the prize to the President
of Columbia for negotiating a deal with the FARC (a nasty bunch) which
deal has sensibly been rejected by Columbian voters. All the other
prizes are awarded by the Swedes. Like you, I find the award to Dylan
puzzling.

Bob Harper
John Thomas
2016-10-14 03:44:08 UTC
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Post by Bob Harper
Actually, the Peace Prize is given by the Norwegian Nobel Committee. And
they've done it again this year, having given the prize to the President
of Columbia for negotiating a deal with the FARC (a nasty bunch) which
deal has sensibly been rejected by Columbian voters. All the other
prizes are awarded by the Swedes. Like you, I find the award to Dylan
puzzling.
Bob, it's Colombia, not Columbia. Columbia is us. But please continue with your learned political analysis.
Bob Harper
2016-10-14 04:58:06 UTC
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Post by John Thomas
Post by Bob Harper
Actually, the Peace Prize is given by the Norwegian Nobel
Committee. And they've done it again this year, having given the
prize to the President of Columbia for negotiating a deal with the
FARC (a nasty bunch) which deal has sensibly been rejected by
Columbian voters. All the other prizes are awarded by the Swedes.
Like you, I find the award to Dylan puzzling.
Bob, it's Colombia, not Columbia. Columbia is us. But please
continue with your learned political analysis.
I suppose I could try to blame autocorrect, but that would be a lie. It
was a brain fart.

I claim no learned analysis, but are you going to say that the FARC
*isn't* a nasty bunch?

Bob Harper
John Thomas
2016-10-14 20:19:39 UTC
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On Thursday, October 13, 2016 at 9:58:17 PM UTC-7, Bob Harper wrote>
Post by Bob Harper
I suppose I could try to blame autocorrect, but that would be a lie. It
was a brain fart.
I claim no learned analysis, but are you going to say that the FARC
*isn't* a nasty bunch?
http://tinyw.in/4w9V
g***@gmail.com
2016-10-13 19:28:57 UTC
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Post by Herman
Post by Raymond Hall
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/14/arts/music/bob-dylan-nobel-prize-literature.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=photo-spot-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=0
There are bound to be some comments, but as a Dylan fan for musical merit (I possess most of his output), this award comes as a mild shock.
Ray Hall, Taree
It's a yuge shock to me. It's a massive, monumental middle finger to the entire literary world (of which, of course, the jury is a part, to a degree).
It goes without saying that Bob Dylan is an epochal singer and songwriter, although in my mind that epoch closed about thirty years ago, or more. But he does not write poetry. He writes songs.
Off the top of my head I can name dozens of poets who deserve the Nobel, after working for decades on their craft and mining their vision. To name one from the US, Louise Gluck.
And there were rumors that the Albanian novelist Ismael Kadare was close, and some people are still thinking Philip Roth has a shot.
All these writers, and many more who will never ever get close to international prizes, but do belong to the literary food chain, have now been told a guy who plays his songs to stadiums and has an alleged net worth of 75 million dollar needs the prize more.
According to the conclusion of this recent article:

- Every nation needs to know who it is and what its collective story is. I wonder if the current U.S. malaise has something to do with the way we have lost touch with our own national poets, or even a common sense of who they might be.

http://www.santacruzsentinel.com/article/NE/20160423/LOCAL1/160429889
g***@gmail.com
2016-10-13 19:45:24 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by Herman
Post by Raymond Hall
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/14/arts/music/bob-dylan-nobel-prize-literature.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=photo-spot-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=0
There are bound to be some comments, but as a Dylan fan for musical merit (I possess most of his output), this award comes as a mild shock.
Ray Hall, Taree
It's a yuge shock to me. It's a massive, monumental middle finger to the entire literary world (of which, of course, the jury is a part, to a degree).
It goes without saying that Bob Dylan is an epochal singer and songwriter, although in my mind that epoch closed about thirty years ago, or more. But he does not write poetry. He writes songs.
Off the top of my head I can name dozens of poets who deserve the Nobel, after working for decades on their craft and mining their vision. To name one from the US, Louise Gluck.
And there were rumors that the Albanian novelist Ismael Kadare was close, and some people are still thinking Philip Roth has a shot.
All these writers, and many more who will never ever get close to international prizes, but do belong to the literary food chain, have now been told a guy who plays his songs to stadiums and has an alleged net worth of 75 million dollar needs the prize more.
- Every nation needs to know who it is and what its collective story is. I wonder if the current U.S. malaise has something to do with the way we have lost touch with our own national poets, or even a common sense of who they might be.
http://www.santacruzsentinel.com/article/NE/20160423/LOCAL1/160429889
Does the fact that Dylan was chosen say something about the masses in these times?:

- To have great poets, there must be great audiences, too. (Whitman)

http://www.press.umich.edu/pdf/9780472117819-intro.pdf
g***@gmail.com
2016-10-13 20:01:53 UTC
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Post by Herman
Post by Raymond Hall
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/14/arts/music/bob-dylan-nobel-prize-literature.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=photo-spot-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=0
There are bound to be some comments, but as a Dylan fan for musical merit (I possess most of his output), this award comes as a mild shock.
Ray Hall, Taree
It's a yuge shock to me. It's a massive, monumental middle finger to the entire literary world (of which, of course, the jury is a part, to a degree).
It goes without saying that Bob Dylan is an epochal singer and songwriter, although in my mind that epoch closed about thirty years ago, or more. But he does not write poetry. He writes songs.
Off the top of my head I can name dozens of poets who deserve the Nobel, after working for decades on their craft and mining their vision. To name one from the US, Louise Gluck.
And there were rumors that the Albanian novelist Ismael Kadare was close, and some people are still thinking Philip Roth has a shot.
All these writers, and many more who will never ever get close to international prizes, but do belong to the literary food chain...
According to this:

- No small group today can suffice for the poet's immediate audience, as such groups did in the stay-at-home aristocratic ages; and the greatest danger which besets modern art is that of slighting the "great audience" whose response alone can give it authority and volume, and of magnifying the importance of a coterie.

https://archive.org/stream/PoetryVolume5/Poetry_vol_5_djvu.txt
g***@gmail.com
2016-10-14 19:41:10 UTC
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Post by Herman
Post by Raymond Hall
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/14/arts/music/bob-dylan-nobel-prize-literature.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=photo-spot-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=0
There are bound to be some comments, but as a Dylan fan for musical merit (I possess most of his output), this award comes as a mild shock.
Ray Hall, Taree
It's a yuge shock to me. It's a massive, monumental middle finger to the entire literary world (of which, of course, the jury is a part, to a degree).
It goes without saying that Bob Dylan is an epochal singer and songwriter, although in my mind that epoch closed about thirty years ago, or more. But he does not write poetry. He writes songs.
Off the top of my head I can name dozens of poets who deserve the Nobel, after working for decades on their craft and mining their vision. To name one from the US, Louise Gluck.
And there were rumors that the Albanian novelist Ismael Kadare was close, and some people are still thinking Philip Roth has a shot.
All these writers, and many more who will never ever get close to international prizes, but do belong to the literary food chain, have now been told a guy who plays his songs to stadiums and has an alleged net worth of 75 million dollar needs the prize more.
Over time, did this apply to Dylan?:

- There was an innocence you just don't find that way again. Later on when it got successful, when it got down to money, that innocence was all gone. We all learned a lot from each other back then. But rock and roll is a tremendously competitive business. There's no reciprocity in it, when it came down to dollars everyone got uptight. Probably, the biggest bringdown of my life was being in a pop group and finding out how much it was like everything it was supposed to be against.

Cass Elliot
g***@gmail.com
2016-10-19 21:56:04 UTC
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Post by Herman
Post by Raymond Hall
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/14/arts/music/bob-dylan-nobel-prize-literature.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=photo-spot-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=0
There are bound to be some comments, but as a Dylan fan for musical merit (I possess most of his output), this award comes as a mild shock.
Ray Hall, Taree
It's a yuge shock to me. It's a massive, monumental middle finger to the entire literary world (of which, of course, the jury is a part, to a degree).
It goes without saying that Bob Dylan is an epochal singer and songwriter, although in my mind that epoch closed about thirty years ago, or more. But he does not write poetry. He writes songs.
Off the top of my head I can name dozens of poets who deserve the Nobel, after working for decades on their craft and mining their vision. To name one from the US, Louise Gluck.
And there were rumors that the Albanian novelist Ismael Kadare was close, and some people are still thinking Philip Roth has a shot.
All these writers, and many more who will never ever get close to international prizes, but do belong to the literary food chain, have now been told a guy who plays his songs to stadiums and has an alleged net worth of 75 million dollar needs the prize more.
According to this:

- While Dylan’s writing is often enjoyable to read on the page, it lacks the precision, economy and, above all, the self-sufficiency of such recent Nobel Prize-winning poets as Seamus Heaney, Derek Walcott, Tomas Transtromer and Wis?awa Szymborska.

https://www.pastemagazine.com/articles/2016/09/does-bob-dylan-deserve-a-nobel-prize.html
j***@gmail.com
2016-10-20 10:56:28 UTC
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Christopher Ricks has taken up Dylan's cause at length in "Dylan's Visions of Sin", more briefly in his recent edition of Dylan's lyrics. He hardly refers to the music at all because he believes he is not very good at judging it. He sticks pretty much to the words on the page and in a tour de force of literary criticism makes a case for Dylan as a great poet His judgements been disputed in general by several reviewers, but afaik, never answered in their particulars or in any detail. So in the absence of any effective counter argument, what the Nobel committee has done appears to me to be reasonable and defensible.
g***@gmail.com
2016-11-22 04:20:15 UTC
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Post by Herman
Post by Raymond Hall
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/14/arts/music/bob-dylan-nobel-prize-literature.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=photo-spot-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=0
There are bound to be some comments, but as a Dylan fan for musical merit (I possess most of his output), this award comes as a mild shock.
Ray Hall, Taree
It's a yuge shock to me. It's a massive, monumental middle finger to the entire literary world (of which, of course, the jury is a part, to a degree).
It goes without saying that Bob Dylan is an epochal singer and songwriter, although in my mind that epoch closed about thirty years ago, or more. But he does not write poetry. He writes songs.
Off the top of my head I can name dozens of poets who deserve the Nobel, after working for decades on their craft and mining their vision. To name one from the US, Louise Gluck.
And there were rumors that the Albanian novelist Ismael Kadare was close, and some people are still thinking Philip Roth has a shot.
All these writers, and many more who will never ever get close to international prizes, but do belong to the literary food chain, have now been told a guy who plays his songs to stadiums and has an alleged net worth of 75 million dollar needs the prize more.
According to the following recent article, the high status of literature in Russia has also changed:

- Poets [once] commanded packed stadiums. Strangers [once] exchanged newspapers on the Metro...

...[The hopes of the liberal intelligentsia] that literature could save the world were quickly and cruelly dashed. Suddenly, words and ideas lost their power. Emptied of poets, the stadiums quickly filled with faith healers, hypnotists, and pyramid schemers. “The discovery of money hit us like an atomic bomb,” says a former Yeltsin supporter.

Unsurprisingly, the intelligentsia was quickly elbowed out by square-jawed men in tracksuits with altogether more pragmatic attitudes to democracy and capitalism. The revolution cast aside its own makers. As one man laments, “We turned out to be ill-suited for the new world we’d been waiting for.”
The plight of the once proud elite, forced to pawn its libraries and turn to cleaning offices and collecting and selling jars of cigarette butts, is a tale of monumental betrayal and humiliation. “Russian novels don’t teach you how to become successful, how to get rich,” Alexievich is told. An entire generation suddenly discovered, as the old joke goes, that everything the party told them about socialism was a lie, but everything it told them about capitalism turned out to be true. “Life is better now,” one woman notes, “but it’s also more revolting.”

https://www.dissentmagazine.org/article/love-and-death-in-revolution-square
Oscar
2017-01-12 05:22:45 UTC
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I was too harsh on Bob Dylan, in previous posts, and in my attempt to defend the prestige of literature and its import in our cultures and societies, viz. are song lyrics literature as such?, I came across as outright dismissive. I did. Yet, I have long admired the great man and have collected his records--the mono mix Blonde on Blonde is one of the archetypical rock statements--and remember watching his 50th birthday special on PBS as a teenager and have seen him in concert a few times. I forgot not only how much I admire and respect him, but what a joy it is to listen to him stand forth and deliver, in the studio and on the stage. So, I've been quietly reevaluating my opinion of Bob Dylan's music since October, when I last saw him play in front of 80,000 in the California desert. Been reacquainting myself with his Sixties works. I went out and bought two important 2016 issues just for this endeavor, and British author Clinton Heylin had a hand in both. First, is his 2016 book, Judas!: From Forest Hills to the Free Trade Hall, A Historical View of the Big Boo (route publishing, UK) http://amzn.to/2j38uWa The second is the hugely important 36 CD boxed set of every single recording, soundboard and audience, made during his historic 1966 tour with the Hawks. Heylin wrote the booklet note for it. I am not even halfway through the box yet, but I dug in deep. I regret posting what I did about Bob Dylan. I look like a daggum fool. Just wanted to come forward and say so.
Frank Berger
2017-01-12 06:35:38 UTC
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Post by Oscar
I was too harsh on Bob Dylan, in previous posts, and in my attempt to defend the prestige of literature and its import in our cultures and societies, viz. are song lyrics literature as such?, I came across as outright dismissive. I did. Yet, I have long admired the great man and have collected his records--the mono mix Blonde on Blonde is one of the archetypical rock statements--and remember watching his 50th birthday special on PBS as a teenager and have seen him in concert a few times. I forgot not only how much I admire and respect him, but what a joy it is to listen to him stand forth and deliver, in the studio and on the stage. So, I've been quietly reevaluating my opinion of Bob Dylan's music since October, when I last saw him play in front of 80,000 in the California desert. Been reacquainting myself with his Sixties works. I went out and bought two important 2016 issues just for this endeavor, and British author Clinton Heylin had a hand in both. First, is his 2016 book, Judas!: From Forest Hills to the Free Trade Hall, A Historical View of the Big Boo (route publishing, UK) http://amzn.to/2j38uWa The second is the hugely important 36 CD boxed set of every single recording, soundboard and audience, made during his historic 1966 tour with the Hawks. Heylin wrote the booklet note for it. I am not even halfway through the box yet, but I dug in deep. I regret posting what I did about Bob Dylan. I look like a daggum fool. Just wanted to come forward and say so.
Hmmm. Maybe you would like to reconsider your opposition to
soon-to-be ex-President
t
2017-01-13 04:07:03 UTC
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Post by Oscar
the hugely important 36 CD boxed set of every single recording, soundboard and audience,
made during his historic 1966 tour with the Hawks

Please can you give a url or something for this? I can't find mention
of it at amazon.
Oscar
2017-01-13 04:52:03 UTC
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The 1966 Live Recordings 36 CD boxed set, Columbia/Legacy.
http://bobdylan.com/news/bob-dylan-1966-live-recordings-released-november/

Some of the tape transfers and remastering was done by Andreas Meyer, formerly of Sony Studios and whose name we see in many classical reissues. Whale of a set, this one. For fanatics only.
a***@gmail.com
2017-01-13 05:42:50 UTC
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Post by t
Please can you give a url or something for this? I can't find mention
of it at amazon.
http://tinyurl.com/zx6r4vh
g***@gmail.com
2017-06-20 08:47:15 UTC
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Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by Herman
Post by Raymond Hall
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/14/arts/music/bob-dylan-nobel-prize-literature.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=photo-spot-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=0
There are bound to be some comments, but as a Dylan fan for musical merit (I possess most of his output), this award comes as a mild shock.
Ray Hall, Taree
It's a yuge shock to me. It's a massive, monumental middle finger to the entire literary world (of which, of course, the jury is a part, to a degree).
It goes without saying that Bob Dylan is an epochal singer and songwriter, although in my mind that epoch closed about thirty years ago, or more. But he does not write poetry. He writes songs.
Off the top of my head I can name dozens of poets who deserve the Nobel, after working for decades on their craft and mining their vision. To name one from the US, Louise Gluck.
And there were rumors that the Albanian novelist Ismael Kadare was close, and some people are still thinking Philip Roth has a shot.
All these writers, and many more who will never ever get close to international prizes, but do belong to the literary food chain, have now been told a guy who plays his songs to stadiums and has an alleged net worth of 75 million dollar needs the prize more.
- Poets [once] commanded packed stadiums. Strangers [once] exchanged newspapers on the Metro...
...[The hopes of the liberal intelligentsia] that literature could save the world were quickly and cruelly dashed. Suddenly, words and ideas lost their power. Emptied of poets, the stadiums quickly filled with faith healers, hypnotists, and pyramid schemers. “The discovery of money hit us like an atomic bomb,” says a former Yeltsin supporter.
Unsurprisingly, the intelligentsia was quickly elbowed out by square-jawed men in tracksuits with altogether more pragmatic attitudes to democracy and capitalism. The revolution cast aside its own makers. As one man laments, “We turned out to be ill-suited for the new world we’d been waiting for.”
The plight of the once proud elite, forced to pawn its libraries and turn to cleaning offices and collecting and selling jars of cigarette butts, is a tale of monumental betrayal and humiliation. “Russian novels don’t teach you how to become successful, how to get rich,” Alexievich is told. An entire generation suddenly discovered, as the old joke goes, that everything the party told them about socialism was a lie, but everything it told them about capitalism turned out to be true. “Life is better now,” one woman notes, “but it’s also more revolting.”
https://www.dissentmagazine.org/article/love-and-death-in-revolution-square
"Will social media kill the novel?..." (recent article):

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2017/jun/17/privacy-literature-social-media-andrew-ohagan
John Thomas
2016-10-13 20:14:58 UTC
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Post by Raymond Hall
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/14/arts/music/bob-dylan-nobel-prize-literature.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=photo-spot-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=0
There are bound to be some comments, but as a Dylan fan for musical merit (I possess most of his output), this award comes as a mild shock.
Ray Hall, Taree
Dylan needs neither the money nor the publicity. Hopefully he will donate the prize money to Syrian refugee relief. But if it's to be given for lyrics give it to Leonard Cohen or Joni Mitchell. They both need it.
John Thomas
2016-10-13 23:19:36 UTC
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Permalink
Dylan needs neither the money nor the publicity. Hopefully he will donate the prize money to Syrian >refugee relief. But if it's to be given for lyrics give it to Leonard Cohen or Joni Mitchell. They both need it.
Having mentioned Leonard Cohen I'm compelled to link to this great piece in the current New Yorker:

PROFILES OCTOBER 17, 2016 ISSUE
LEONARD COHEN MAKES IT DARKER
At eighty-two, the troubadour has another album coming. Like him, it is obsessed with mortality, God-infused, and funny http://www.newyorker.com/?p=3262498
dk
2016-10-13 22:11:19 UTC
Reply
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Post by Raymond Hall
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/14/arts/music/bob-dylan-nobel-prize-literature.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=photo-spot-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=0
There are bound to be some comments, but as a Dylan fan
for musical merit (I possess most of his output), this
award comes as a mild shock.
It makes as much sense as Donald Trump becoming POTUS.
I hope this event does not portend the latter! ;-)

dk
t
2016-10-14 03:39:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
The reactions here are curious, for during Dylan's years of peak fame in
the 60s, it was difficult to find anyone writing about him as a
musician. He was only discussed as literature. Typical was a long
serious Saturday Review piece that compared him to Apollinaire.

Ironically. it is Dylan's protest songs that made him an icon. Yet
apparently he resisted being political, which was a reason he and Joan
Baez went different ways.

I confess I haven't been attracted to his later work.
O
2016-10-14 04:06:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by t
The reactions here are curious, for during Dylan's years of peak fame in
the 60s, it was difficult to find anyone writing about him as a
musician. He was only discussed as literature. Typical was a long
serious Saturday Review piece that compared him to Apollinaire.
I agree. It's not his music which inspired his popularity, but his
lyrics. Take them away and there isn't a whole lot left.

-Owen
g***@gmail.com
2016-10-14 08:06:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Raymond Hall
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/14/arts/music/bob-dylan-nobel-prize-literature.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=photo-spot-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=0
There are bound to be some comments, but as a Dylan fan for musical merit (I possess most of his output), this award comes as a mild shock.
Ray Hall, Taree
Shock? Are we supposed to?:

- Well, it ain't no use to sit and wonder why, babe
Even you don't know by now
And it ain't no use to sit and wonder why, babe
It'll never do somehow...

...Don't think twice, it's all right.
g***@gmail.com
2016-10-14 09:53:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Raymond Hall
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/14/arts/music/bob-dylan-nobel-prize-literature.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=photo-spot-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=0
There are bound to be some comments, but as a Dylan fan for musical merit (I possess most of his output), this award comes as a mild shock.
Ray Hall, Taree
- They say the human race

Is falling on its face

And hasn't very faaaaaaaaaaaaaaar to go...

"South Pacific"

-------------------

(Do I sound like a cockeyed pessimist?)
John Thomas
2016-10-16 13:30:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
'The Swedish Academy’s mid-October announcement regarding literature seldom fails to occasion second-guessing, if not outrage. Whenever a foreign writer mostly unknown to English speakers is awarded the Nobel, a certain constituency will suggest that the Swedes are trolling us. Whenever someone who is already a household name across the world gets it, a different faction is crestfallen, because he or she did not need the publicity. This has presumably been going on since Sully Prudhomme took it away in 1901, his honeyed verses to dance forevermore on every child’s lips.

Bob Dylan was awarded the big prize this morning, and my social-media timeline has been alive with indignation ever since. The Nobel did not go to Ngugi wa Thiong’o, did not go to Ursula K. LeGuin, did not go to an overlooked novelist in a small country working in a seldom-translated language. But even more people are upset that the prize went to a “songwriter.” Some of those same people are still grousing that last year it was awarded to Svetlana Alexievich, a “journalist.” They have decided, for whatever reasons, that song lyrics and non-fictional prose do not qualify as literature. Which would come as a surprise to most writers before the mid-eighteenth century or so, although they have the disadvantage of being dead.

And people are upset because Bob Dylan is the voice of some generation other than theirs, because he works in a popular idiom, because he does not work in this minute’s popular idiom, because he appeared on a car commercial that aired during the Super Bowl, because his songwriting skills dropped off after this record or that one (the candidate albums are broadly varied)—because he was famous long ago. But note that phrase: “famous long ago.” Although undoubtedly people used it in speech and writing before Dylan was even born, it is nonetheless now tied to him: “…for playing the electric violin on Desolation Row.”

You may not think of Dylan as a poet, because his lyrics don’t always scan well on the page, but consider how many lines of poetry he has embedded in common discourse: “But to live outside the law you must be honest”; “She knows there’s no success like failure/And that failure’s no success at all”; “Ah but I was so much older then/I’m younger than that now”—those are just off the top of my head, and we could go on like this all night.

Somebody will argue that “You’re the top, you’re the Colosseum” rolls off the tongue just as trippingly, and nobody gave the big Swedish prize to Cole Porter. And somebody else will point out that “My smile is my makeup I wear since my break-up with you” does likewise, and that Dylan himself allegedly once named Smokey Robinson the greatest living poet in the nation, and where’s Smokey’s Nobel?

Song lyrics and poetry might have been interchangeable concepts for the Elizabethans, but two streams divided later on. As great as Porter and Robinson were as songwriters, they were working in—and profiting from—the air of frivolity that attended lyric-writing by the mid-twentieth century, an era that prized verbal dexterity and rapid evaporation. Dylan, through his ambiguity, his ability to throw down puzzles that continue to echo and to generate interpretations, almost singlehandedly created a climate in which lyrics were taken seriously. And Dylan accomplished something that few novelists or poets or for that matter songwriters (pace Joni Mitchell) have managed to do in our era: he changed the time he inhabited. Through words, with music as the fluid of their transmission, he affected the perception, outlook, opinions, ambitions, and assumptions of hundreds of millions of people all over the world.

The Nobel Prize in Literature cannot ever be all things to all people, and while this year’s award failed to accomplish various possible objectives, it was not in any way misapplied. Me, I just wish I’d had the foresight to plunk down a fifty on Dylan at Ladbroke’s. “The highway is for gamblers, better use your sense/Take what you have gathered from coincidence.”'

http://bit.ly/2eelRET
Gerald Martin
2016-10-16 14:01:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
OK; it's just me but I always found Dylan's music smug and selfcongratulatory, hence entirely offputting.
HT
2016-10-16 16:27:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Thomas
You may not think of Dylan as a poet, because his lyrics don’t always scan well on the page, but consider how many lines of poetry he has embedded in common discourse: “But to live outside the law you must be honest”; “She knows there’s no success like failure/And that failure’s no success at all”; “Ah but I was so much older then/I’m younger than that now”—those are just off the top of my head, and we could go on like this all night.
In that case it's time the next Nobel prize for literature goes to one of the internationally best known soccer players: Johan Cruijff. He is the author of great literature like: "Every advantage has its disadvantage!" He wasn't a singer/songwriter but a brilliant soccer player/sports commentator. <g>

Henk
Al Eisner
2016-10-19 19:53:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
'The Swedish Academy?s mid-October announcement regarding literature
seldom fails to occasion second-guessing, if not outrage. Whenever a
foreign writer mostly unknown to English speakers is awarded the
Nobel, a certain constituency will suggest that the Swedes are
trolling us. Whenever someone who is already a household name across
the world gets it, a different faction is crestfallen, because he or
she did not need the publicity. This has presumably been going on
since Sully Prudhomme took it away in 1901, his honeyed verses to
dance forevermore on every child?s lips.
Bob Dylan was awarded the big prize this morning, and my social-media
timeline has been alive with indignation ever since. The Nobel did not
go to Ngugi wa Thiong?o, did not go to Ursula K. LeGuin, did not go to
an overlooked novelist in a small country working in a
seldom-translated language. But even more people are upset that the
prize went to a ?songwriter.? Some of those same people are still
grousing that last year it was awarded to Svetlana Alexievich, a
?journalist.? They have decided, for whatever reasons, that song
lyrics and non-fictional prose do not qualify as literature. Which
would come as a surprise to most writers before the mid-eighteenth
century or so, although they have the disadvantage of being dead.
And people are upset because Bob Dylan is the voice of some generation
other than theirs, because he works in a popular idiom, because he
does not work in this minute?s popular idiom, because he appeared on a
car commercial that aired during the Super Bowl, because his
songwriting skills dropped off after this record or that one (the
candidate albums are broadly varied)?because he was famous long
ago. But note that phrase: ?famous long ago.? Although undoubtedly
people used it in speech and writing before Dylan was even born, it is
nonetheless now tied to him: ??for playing the electric violin on
Desolation Row.?
You may not think of Dylan as a poet, because his lyrics don?t always
scan well on the page, but consider how many lines of poetry he has
embedded in common discourse: ?But to live outside the law you must be
honest?; ?She knows there?s no success like failure/And that failure?s
no success at all?; ?Ah but I was so much older then/I?m younger than
that now??those are just off the top of my head, and we could go on
like this all night.
Somebody will argue that ?You?re the top, you?re the Colosseum? rolls
off the tongue just as trippingly, and nobody gave the big Swedish
prize to Cole Porter. And somebody else will point out that ?My smile
is my makeup I wear since my break-up with you? does likewise, and
that Dylan himself allegedly once named Smokey Robinson the greatest
living poet in the nation, and where?s Smokey?s Nobel?
Song lyrics and poetry might have been interchangeable concepts for
the Elizabethans, but two streams divided later on. As great as Porter
and Robinson were as songwriters, they were working in?and profiting
from?the air of frivolity that attended lyric-writing by the
mid-twentieth century, an era that prized verbal dexterity and rapid
evaporation. Dylan, through his ambiguity, his ability to throw down
puzzles that continue to echo and to generate interpretations, almost
singlehandedly created a climate in which lyrics were taken
seriously. And Dylan accomplished something that few novelists or
poets or for that matter songwriters (pace Joni Mitchell) have managed
to do in our era: he changed the time he inhabited. Through words,
with music as the fluid of their transmission, he affected the
perception, outlook, opinions, ambitions, and assumptions of hundreds
of millions of people all over the world.
The Nobel Prize in Literature cannot ever be all things to all people,
and while this year?s award failed to accomplish various possible
objectives, it was not in any way misapplied. Me, I just wish I?d had
the foresight to plunk down a fifty on Dylan at Ladbroke?s. ?The
highway is for gamblers, better use your sense/Take what you have
gathered from coincidence.?'
http://bit.ly/2eelRET
This all seems to me to be very well put. Dylan's lyrics are a different
sort of poetry from "poetry on the page". For the overall effect, it's
really necessary to consider the combination of the lyrics with the
music, the latter more than "the fluid of their transmission", and
perhaps even with his rather odd singing voice. As someone noted,
the critics of his time and later primarily focused on the lyrics,
which certainly represented something new in popular song. But most
pop music critics comment mainly about lyrics, not being competent
to really address the music. It's really the combination, all at
once, which mattered.

Is it "literature"? It's certainly a stretch of the conventional
definition, although not an implausible one. Should this have received
a Nobel Prize? I have no idea. (Does Dylan himself actually care?)
--
Al Eisner
g***@gmail.com
2016-10-19 21:31:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Al Eisner
'The Swedish Academy?s mid-October announcement regarding literature
seldom fails to occasion second-guessing, if not outrage. Whenever a
foreign writer mostly unknown to English speakers is awarded the
Nobel, a certain constituency will suggest that the Swedes are
trolling us. Whenever someone who is already a household name across
the world gets it, a different faction is crestfallen, because he or
she did not need the publicity. This has presumably been going on
since Sully Prudhomme took it away in 1901, his honeyed verses to
dance forevermore on every child?s lips.
Bob Dylan was awarded the big prize this morning, and my social-media
timeline has been alive with indignation ever since. The Nobel did not
go to Ngugi wa Thiong?o, did not go to Ursula K. LeGuin, did not go to
an overlooked novelist in a small country working in a
seldom-translated language. But even more people are upset that the
prize went to a ?songwriter.? Some of those same people are still
grousing that last year it was awarded to Svetlana Alexievich, a
?journalist.? They have decided, for whatever reasons, that song
lyrics and non-fictional prose do not qualify as literature. Which
would come as a surprise to most writers before the mid-eighteenth
century or so, although they have the disadvantage of being dead.
And people are upset because Bob Dylan is the voice of some generation
other than theirs, because he works in a popular idiom, because he
does not work in this minute?s popular idiom, because he appeared on a
car commercial that aired during the Super Bowl, because his
songwriting skills dropped off after this record or that one (the
candidate albums are broadly varied)?because he was famous long
ago. But note that phrase: ?famous long ago.? Although undoubtedly
people used it in speech and writing before Dylan was even born, it is
nonetheless now tied to him: ??for playing the electric violin on
Desolation Row.?
You may not think of Dylan as a poet, because his lyrics don?t always
scan well on the page, but consider how many lines of poetry he has
embedded in common discourse: ?But to live outside the law you must be
honest?; ?She knows there?s no success like failure/And that failure?s
no success at all?; ?Ah but I was so much older then/I?m younger than
that now??those are just off the top of my head, and we could go on
like this all night.
Somebody will argue that ?You?re the top, you?re the Colosseum? rolls
off the tongue just as trippingly, and nobody gave the big Swedish
prize to Cole Porter. And somebody else will point out that ?My smile
is my makeup I wear since my break-up with you? does likewise, and
that Dylan himself allegedly once named Smokey Robinson the greatest
living poet in the nation, and where?s Smokey?s Nobel?
Song lyrics and poetry might have been interchangeable concepts for
the Elizabethans, but two streams divided later on. As great as Porter
and Robinson were as songwriters, they were working in?and profiting
from?the air of frivolity that attended lyric-writing by the
mid-twentieth century, an era that prized verbal dexterity and rapid
evaporation. Dylan, through his ambiguity, his ability to throw down
puzzles that continue to echo and to generate interpretations, almost
singlehandedly created a climate in which lyrics were taken
seriously. And Dylan accomplished something that few novelists or
poets or for that matter songwriters (pace Joni Mitchell) have managed
to do in our era: he changed the time he inhabited. Through words,
with music as the fluid of their transmission, he affected the
perception, outlook, opinions, ambitions, and assumptions of hundreds
of millions of people all over the world.
The Nobel Prize in Literature cannot ever be all things to all people,
and while this year?s award failed to accomplish various possible
objectives, it was not in any way misapplied. Me, I just wish I?d had
the foresight to plunk down a fifty on Dylan at Ladbroke?s. ?The
highway is for gamblers, better use your sense/Take what you have
gathered from coincidence.?'
http://bit.ly/2eelRET
This all seems to me to be very well put. Dylan's lyrics are a different
sort of poetry from "poetry on the page". For the overall effect, it's
really necessary to consider the combination of the lyrics with the
music, the latter more than "the fluid of their transmission", and
perhaps even with his rather odd singing voice. As someone noted,
the critics of his time and later primarily focused on the lyrics,
which certainly represented something new in popular song. But most
pop music critics comment mainly about lyrics, not being competent
to really address the music. It's really the combination, all at
once, which mattered.
Is it "literature"? It's certainly a stretch of the conventional
definition, although not an implausible one. Should this have received
a Nobel Prize? I have no idea. (Does Dylan himself actually care?)
--
Al Eisner
No:

http://kdhnews.com/living/ae/the-latest-dylan-doesn-t-refer-to-nobel-win-during/article_85abac73-91bb-5614-b24c-a47981c96ec3.html
g***@gmail.com
2016-10-19 21:43:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by g***@gmail.com
Post by Al Eisner
'The Swedish Academy?s mid-October announcement regarding literature
seldom fails to occasion second-guessing, if not outrage. Whenever a
foreign writer mostly unknown to English speakers is awarded the
Nobel, a certain constituency will suggest that the Swedes are
trolling us. Whenever someone who is already a household name across
the world gets it, a different faction is crestfallen, because he or
she did not need the publicity. This has presumably been going on
since Sully Prudhomme took it away in 1901, his honeyed verses to
dance forevermore on every child?s lips.
Bob Dylan was awarded the big prize this morning, and my social-media
timeline has been alive with indignation ever since. The Nobel did not
go to Ngugi wa Thiong?o, did not go to Ursula K. LeGuin, did not go to
an overlooked novelist in a small country working in a
seldom-translated language. But even more people are upset that the
prize went to a ?songwriter.? Some of those same people are still
grousing that last year it was awarded to Svetlana Alexievich, a
?journalist.? They have decided, for whatever reasons, that song
lyrics and non-fictional prose do not qualify as literature. Which
would come as a surprise to most writers before the mid-eighteenth
century or so, although they have the disadvantage of being dead.
And people are upset because Bob Dylan is the voice of some generation
other than theirs, because he works in a popular idiom, because he
does not work in this minute?s popular idiom, because he appeared on a
car commercial that aired during the Super Bowl, because his
songwriting skills dropped off after this record or that one (the
candidate albums are broadly varied)?because he was famous long
ago. But note that phrase: ?famous long ago.? Although undoubtedly
people used it in speech and writing before Dylan was even born, it is
nonetheless now tied to him: ??for playing the electric violin on
Desolation Row.?
You may not think of Dylan as a poet, because his lyrics don?t always
scan well on the page, but consider how many lines of poetry he has
embedded in common discourse: ?But to live outside the law you must be
honest?; ?She knows there?s no success like failure/And that failure?s
no success at all?; ?Ah but I was so much older then/I?m younger than
that now??those are just off the top of my head, and we could go on
like this all night.
Somebody will argue that ?You?re the top, you?re the Colosseum? rolls
off the tongue just as trippingly, and nobody gave the big Swedish
prize to Cole Porter. And somebody else will point out that ?My smile
is my makeup I wear since my break-up with you? does likewise, and
that Dylan himself allegedly once named Smokey Robinson the greatest
living poet in the nation, and where?s Smokey?s Nobel?
Song lyrics and poetry might have been interchangeable concepts for
the Elizabethans, but two streams divided later on. As great as Porter
and Robinson were as songwriters, they were working in?and profiting
from?the air of frivolity that attended lyric-writing by the
mid-twentieth century, an era that prized verbal dexterity and rapid
evaporation. Dylan, through his ambiguity, his ability to throw down
puzzles that continue to echo and to generate interpretations, almost
singlehandedly created a climate in which lyrics were taken
seriously. And Dylan accomplished something that few novelists or
poets or for that matter songwriters (pace Joni Mitchell) have managed
to do in our era: he changed the time he inhabited. Through words,
with music as the fluid of their transmission, he affected the
perception, outlook, opinions, ambitions, and assumptions of hundreds
of millions of people all over the world.
The Nobel Prize in Literature cannot ever be all things to all people,
and while this year?s award failed to accomplish various possible
objectives, it was not in any way misapplied. Me, I just wish I?d had
the foresight to plunk down a fifty on Dylan at Ladbroke?s. ?The
highway is for gamblers, better use your sense/Take what you have
gathered from coincidence.?'
http://bit.ly/2eelRET
This all seems to me to be very well put. Dylan's lyrics are a different
sort of poetry from "poetry on the page". For the overall effect, it's
really necessary to consider the combination of the lyrics with the
music, the latter more than "the fluid of their transmission", and
perhaps even with his rather odd singing voice. As someone noted,
the critics of his time and later primarily focused on the lyrics,
which certainly represented something new in popular song. But most
pop music critics comment mainly about lyrics, not being competent
to really address the music. It's really the combination, all at
once, which mattered.
Is it "literature"? It's certainly a stretch of the conventional
definition, although not an implausible one. Should this have received
a Nobel Prize? I have no idea. (Does Dylan himself actually care?)
--
Al Eisner
http://kdhnews.com/living/ae/the-latest-dylan-doesn-t-refer-to-nobel-win-during/article_85abac73-91bb-5614-b24c-a47981c96ec3.html
http://radiomilwaukee.org/discover-music/bob-dylan-wins-nobel-prize/
g***@gmail.com
2017-06-16 21:54:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Raymond Hall
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/14/arts/music/bob-dylan-nobel-prize-literature.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=photo-spot-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=0
There are bound to be some comments, but as a Dylan fan for musical merit (I possess most of his output), this award comes as a mild shock.
Ray Hall, Taree
What does Dylan read for 'inspiration'?:

Loading Image...

http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/culturebox/2017/06/did_bob_dylan_take_from_sparknotes_for_his_nobel_lecture.html
Oscar
2017-06-16 22:48:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Penthouse Forum.
g***@gmail.com
2020-10-06 20:10:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Raymond Hall
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/14/arts/music/bob-dylan-nobel-prize-literature.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=photo-spot-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=0
There are bound to be some comments, but as a Dylan fan for musical merit (I possess most of his output), this award comes as a mild shock.
Ray Hall, Taree
https://newrepublic.com/article/159628/will-win-2020-nobel-prize-literature
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