Discussion:
another film composer is gone
(too old to reply)
Brendan R. Wehrung
2004-08-10 02:48:07 UTC
Permalink
Oscar-Nominated Composer Raskin Dies
Aug 9, 9:18 PM (ET)

LOS ANGELES (AP) - David Raksin, an Oscar-nominated composer who arranged
music for Charlie Chaplin's silent classic "Modern Times" and wrote the
memorable theme for 1944's "Laura," died Monday, his son said. He was 92.

Raksin, who had been ailing for several years and had early stage
Alzheimer's disease, died at his Van Nuys home, according to son Alex Raksin.

Although he wrote music for nearly 170 films and television shows, he is
best known for the theme song to "Laura," a murder mystery directed by
Otto Preminger.

He wrote it after his first wife separated from him.

"She wrote him a 'Dear John' letter, and he only had two days to write the
score or else they were going to use another. He turned to the letter for
inspiration," Alex Raksin said. "The studio saw a mystery. ... He saw a
love story."

After the film debuted, Johnny Mercer wrote lyrics for the song, which was
later performed by Frank Sinatra, Rosemary Clooney and Ella Fitzgerald
among others.

Raksin received Academy Award music nominations for 1947's "Forever
Amber," a drama set in the 1600s, and 1958's "Separate Tables," a romance.

Raksin was born Aug. 4, 1912, in Philadelphia and was educated at the
University of Pennsylvania.

At 23, Raksin came to Hollywood to work with Chaplin, after toiling in
dance bands and arranging for Broadway shows. He told the Los Angeles
Times in 2002 that while working on "Modern Times," he transcribed
Chaplin's hummed and whistled tunes and arranged them into a score.

His other credits include music for "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty"
(1947), "Force of Evil" (1948), "The Bad and the Beautiful" (1952),
"Apache" (1954), and the TV shows "Wagon Train" (1957), "Ben Casey" (1961)
and "Medical Center" (1969), as well as the 1983 nuclear-apocalypse TV
movie "The Day After."

He also worked as a music professor at the University of Southern
California.


--
Thomas Muething
2004-08-10 09:18:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brendan R. Wehrung
Oscar-Nominated Composer Raskin Dies
Aug 9, 9:18 PM (ET)
LOS ANGELES (AP) - David Raksin, an Oscar-nominated composer who arranged
music for Charlie Chaplin's silent classic "Modern Times" and wrote the
memorable theme for 1944's "Laura," died Monday, his son said. He was 92.
This, and two of his most memorable scores (The Bad and the Beautiful
and Firever Amber) are preserved on a beautifully played (National
Philharmonic Orchestra, composer conducting) and engineered (Kenneth E.
Wilkinson) LP/CD for RCA's Classic Film Scores series. It was the
worst-selling LP in the series.

Thomas
Thomas Muething
2004-08-10 09:35:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brendan R. Wehrung
Oscar-Nominated Composer Raskin Dies
Aug 9, 9:18 PM (ET)
LOS ANGELES (AP) - David Raksin, an Oscar-nominated composer who arranged
music for Charlie Chaplin's silent classic "Modern Times" and wrote the
memorable theme for 1944's "Laura," died Monday, his son said. He was 92.
This, and two of his most memorable scores (The Bad and the Beautiful
and Forever Amber) are preserved on a beautifully played (National
Philharmonic Orchestra, composer conducting) and engineered (Kenneth E.
Wilkinson) LP/CD for RCA's Classic Film Scores series. It was the
worst-selling LP in the series.

Thomas
Van Eyes
2004-08-10 14:18:23 UTC
Permalink
Oscar-Nominated Composer Raskin Dies....
R.I.P.

TV--Ben Casey, Wagon Train. Movies--Al Capone, Pat and Mike, The Hound
of the Baskervilles.
Let's not mention, Earth versus the Flying Saucers.

Regards
--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG
Thomas Muething
2004-08-10 15:37:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Van Eyes
Let's not mention, Earth versus the Flying Saucers.
Let's not, because Raksin didn't *score* that one.


"Original Music by
Mischa Bakaleinikoff (uncredited)

Non-Original Music by
Daniele Amfitheatrof (stock music) (uncredited)
Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco (stock music) (uncredited)
George Duning (stock music) (uncredited)
David Raksin (stock music) (uncredited)
Miklós Rózsa (stock music) (uncredited)
Hans J. Salter (stock music) (uncredited)
Leith Stevens (stock music) (uncredited)"

Thomas
Van Eyes
2004-08-10 17:46:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Thomas Muething
Let's not, because Raksin didn't *score* that one.
"Original Music by
Mischa Bakaleinikoff (uncredited)
Non-Original Music by
Daniele Amfitheatrof (stock music) (uncredited)
Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco (stock music) (uncredited)
George Duning (stock music) (uncredited)
David Raksin (stock music) (uncredited)
Miklós Rózsa (stock music) (uncredited)
Hans J. Salter (stock music) (uncredited)
Leith Stevens (stock music) (uncredited)"
Aka, The Invasion of the Flying Saucers. Interesting, that
Castelnuovo-Tedesco and Rózsa were also helping hands.


Regards
--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG
Thomas Muething
2004-08-11 00:31:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Van Eyes
Aka, The Invasion of the Flying Saucers. Interesting, that
Castelnuovo-Tedesco and Rózsa were also helping hands.
No one lent a helping hand to anybody. As the credits indicate, Mischa
Bakaleinikoff, the music director of Columbia Pictures, just cobbled
together a new score based on preexisting music by the composers
mentioned, and presumably provided (or let an unnamed staff composer
provide) bridging material. This was common practice for B- and C
pictures at Columbia and Universal.

Thomas
Van Eyes
2004-08-11 00:49:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Thomas Muething
No one lent a helping hand to anybody. As the credits indicate, Mischa
Bakaleinikoff, the music director of Columbia Pictures, just cobbled
together a new score based on preexisting music by the composers
mentioned, and presumably provided (or let an unnamed staff composer
provide) bridging material. This was common practice for B- and C
pictures at Columbia and Universal.
Sounds like you're all hot 'n bothered.

Regards
--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG
Thomas Muething
2004-08-11 07:33:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Van Eyes
Sounds like you're all hot 'n bothered.
Not at all. Sci-fi films often contain the most ingenious film scores,
like Bernard Herrmann's "The Day the Earth Stood Still", or Dmitri
Tiomkin's "The Thing". It just so happens that Raksin never scored a
sci-fi B picture.

Thomas

Tom Deacon
2004-08-10 16:03:51 UTC
Permalink
On 8/10/04 10:18 AM, in article
Post by Van Eyes
Oscar-Nominated Composer Raskin Dies....
R.I.P.
TV--Ben Casey, Wagon Train. Movies--Al Capone, Pat and Mike, The Hound
of the Baskervilles.
Let's not mention, Earth versus the Flying Saucers.
Would it not be nice to spell his name correctly. David RaKsin.

TD
Van Eyes
2004-08-10 17:50:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tom Deacon
Would it not be nice to spell his name correctly. David RaKsin.
But a small thing in the rmcr family.

Regards
--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG
Scott Kurtz
2004-08-10 22:13:13 UTC
Permalink
This post might be inappropriate. Click to display it.
Scott Kurtz
2004-08-10 22:24:08 UTC
Permalink
In the previous post I meant to refer to Loek Dikker's score for Paul
Verhoeven's The Fourth Man as being rather Raksin-like.
Post by Scott Kurtz
Among others there were also his scores for the introspective western Will
Penny, Carrie (the Theodore Dreiser-based film, not the Sissy Spacek horror
flick), Separate Tables, and two films for the maverick American director
Curtis Harrington: Night Tide and What's the Matter with Helen? After around
1970 Raksin's main focus was on teaching film composition at USC. A
prominent student of his was the Dutch composer Loek Dikker, whose score for
Paul Verhoeven is rather Raksin-influenced. I think Raksin was a bit wistful
over the fact that he was not much in demand in the Hollywood of the 1970s
and 1980s. Raksin knew and admired Arnold Schoenberg, but he once remarked
that it would have been preferable if composers of the postwar era had
flocked to the example of Alban Berg rather than Anton Webern. And the score
he wrote for The Day After was mostly not used: it was written in a stark
barren pointillistic mode, influenced by Xenakis and Penderecki, and its aim
was to depict nuclear holocaust as the Ultimately Grim Horror that it
undoubtedly is. But it was too much for network executives and the music
supervisors/arrangers under their control, so excerpts from preexisting
Virgil Thomson scores were used instead.
Post by Van Eyes
Oscar-Nominated Composer Raskin Dies....
R.I.P.
TV--Ben Casey, Wagon Train. Movies--Al Capone, Pat and Mike, The Hound
of the Baskervilles.
Let's not mention, Earth versus the Flying Saucers.
Regards
--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG
Continue reading on narkive:
Loading...