Discussion:
WAYLTL - September,2019
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Bozo
2019-09-05 20:14:03 UTC
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Had not head these in my collection for awhile, glad I listened today. Pianist Boren has recorded the 2 Vine works on an Enharmonic cd I have, here he and another pianist both live; my Lilburn the YT Poynton recording on a download I purchased ; my Williamson on a complete Hyperion cd set of his piano concerti played by Piers Lane, here a recording with the composer as soloist.


Carl Vine (Australia):

( “Anne Landa “ Preludes )

(Piano Sonata No.3 )

Douglas Lilburn (New Zealand ) :

Piano Sonata No.1





Malcolm Williamson (Australia):

Piano Concerto No. 2

( “ Surprising “ slow mov. given rest of the work )
Bozo
2019-09-05 23:03:15 UTC
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Pianist Hillary Demske,AlbanyRecords cd of piano music of Henry Martin, "New Fugue" here, entire cd at YT :



Jonathan Moser,cello,Paul Rivinius,piano,Frank Bridge's amazing Cello Sonata ( virtuoso piano part, too ) , rest of Haenssler Classics -SWR cd of Sonata at YT:


Bozo
2019-09-06 12:53:20 UTC
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Roberto Gerhard's Violin Concerto ( 1942-43 ) cd, the work continues to grow on me.
BBC Symphony Orchestra
Colin Davis, conductor
Yfrah Neaman, violin
c***@gmail.com
2019-09-06 13:41:42 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Roberto Gerhard's Violin Concerto ( 1942-43 ) cd, the work continues to grow on me.
BBC Symphony Orchestra
Colin Davis, conductor
Yfrah Neaman, violin
Ditto, and that's a really fine performance. I've been on another search for obscure settings of Lamentations for Holy Week. I'm looking forward to the new Peñalosa recording by New York Polyphony, due for imminent release on Bis. While poking around at Presto (where I found the best price for the Bis CD), I "discovered" a setting by Joan Baptista Comes, who flourished in Valencia during the first half of the 17th century. Downloadable here: https://www.prestomusic.com/classical/products/8001231--comes-lamentationes-jeremiae-prophetae. Lovely settings (mainly for Holy Thursday, with some for Good Friday), beautifully performed. Next up: a setting by late 15th-century composer, probably from Catalan, named Bernhard Ycart, from this download: https://www.prestomusic.com/classical/products/8013923--lamentio.

AC
Lawrence Chalmers
2019-09-07 23:02:28 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Had not head these in my collection for awhile, glad I listened today. Pianist Boren has recorded the 2 Vine works on an Enharmonic cd I have, here he and another pianist both live; my Lilburn the YT Poynton recording on a download I purchased ; my Williamson on a complete Hyperion cd set of his piano concerti played by Piers Lane, here a recording with the composer as soloist.
http://youtu.be/fFqJKPg2yaE ( “Anne Landa “ Preludes )
http://youtu.be/ADx3tZ0yxr0 (Piano Sonata No.3 )
Piano Sonata No.1
http://youtu.be/nxQth3dru_I
http://youtu.be/YSnwn1LUpnE
http://youtu.be/dMmsWgG8S8Y
Piano Concerto No. 2
http://youtu.be/C0owk-BgiA8 ( “ Surprising “ slow mov. given rest of the work )
CD1 Debussy Preludes books 1 and 2 by Alain Planes on Harmonia Mundi part of complete works. There are so many fine performances of the Debussy works and this ranks among my favorites. The next cd in the set I will listen to tomorrow. It features the Etudes which I've had a hard time warming up to.
Bozo
2019-09-10 20:44:58 UTC
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Rautavaara's Violin Concerto ( 1976-77), Elmar Oliviera, Leif Segerstam,Helsinki Phil, my Ondine cd recorded with the composer present. Should be heard more often, I had neglected it for too long.

Brahms Piano Quartet No. 3, Op.60,Jorg Demus, Barylli Quartet, apparently a 1956 Westminster lp to a Universal Victor cd, one of my fav Brahms works, great performance here despite YT sound. I dont have the cd:


Bozo
2019-09-10 22:38:50 UTC
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Villa-Lobos, complete music for solo guitar,Norbert Kraft,Naxos.Sine qua non for me.
number_six
2019-09-11 01:11:31 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Villa-Lobos, complete music for solo guitar,Norbert Kraft,Naxos.Sine qua non for me.
Kraft is excellent. I admit I imprinted on Bream for the Villa-Lobos Five Preludes. I think it was the Westminster recording, but i had a vinyl reissue on the Sine qua non label -- oddly enough! Eventually got them on CD.
Bozo
2019-09-11 23:23:34 UTC
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Today :

Karen Walwyn's " Reflections on 9-11 ", for solo piano, the composer as pianist, Albany cd in my collection :

https://tinyurl.com/y4etzymd

George Lloyd's 3rd Piano Concerto,Kathryn Stott, pianist, the composer conducting BBC Phil, my Albany cd:




Bozo
2019-09-16 17:08:46 UTC
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Some brief recordings of George Copeland :

http://arbiterrecords.org/lifting-the-lid-on-debussys-canope/
Bozo
2019-09-16 20:59:32 UTC
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Post by Bozo
http://arbiterrecords.org/lifting-the-lid-on-debussys-canope/
George Copeland plays his transcription of Debussy’s “ Prélude à L'après-midi d'un Faune”, recorded 1933, label RCA ? :


AB
2019-09-17 15:40:08 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Post by Bozo
http://arbiterrecords.org/lifting-the-lid-on-debussys-canope/
http://youtu.be/Yn2FbXvsvKE
hmve you heard Grosvenor's version, from a concert?

AB
HT
2019-09-17 18:59:23 UTC
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Poulenc. Most of his piano music by several pianists - as well as several concertos. Poulenc is one of the very few composers who never bores me.

Henk
Bozo
2019-09-17 20:52:12 UTC
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Poulenc. Most of his piano music by several pianists - as well as several concertos. Poulenc is one of the >very few composers who never bores me.
Largely agree.

To my knowledge, first Poulenc I heard was his Piano Concerto ( for solo piano ) played by Ozan Marsh,pianist, with NY Phil,Andre Kostelanetz conductor, live at then Philharmonic Hall, in NYC,Summer 1964, when I was 16. Couple recent lives I enjoyed,fww:

Francis Poulenc : Élégie en accords alternés, pour 2 pianos - Capriccio (d'après Le bal masqué) - L'embarquement pour Cythère, for two pianos - Stephen Kovacevich,Margaret Fingerhut:

https://www.rtbf.be/auvio/detail_concert-du-soir?id=2540842

Poulenc’s Cello Sonata , Edgar Moreau,David Kadouch , my first hearing:

https://www.rtbf.be/auvio/detail_concert-de-l-apres-midi?id=2541658
Bozo
2019-09-18 00:52:45 UTC
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Ignace Tiegerman,Chopin Op.20 Scherzo,4th Ballade, Barcarolle,3rd Sonata,Arbiter Records 2-cd set in my collection.Mon Dieu ! :


HT
2019-09-21 19:07:08 UTC
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Post by Bozo
http://youtu.be/5TlVX8EVL34
Momo Kodama playing the Debussy and Hosokawa etudes. Some Debussy alternated with some Hosokawa. Suggesting that there is a relation between the two. Both seem to have "point and line" in common. I've little patience with descriptions like these. Kodama's playing is more than adequate. The Hosokawa etudes usually have a very strong start but tend to become indistinguishable from other so-called modern piano music after some time.

Julian Riem playing the Debussy and Szymanowski etudes. Riem is a student of Beroff and Buchbinder. A problem is TYXart's engineering. It doesn't help Riem by making his interpretations more uneven than they probably are. His performances can be interesting.

Eric le Sage turns Fauré's nocturnes into ballades. A great CD.

Henk
Bozo
2019-09-22 14:46:28 UTC
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Bartok solo piano miniatures and sonata, Arcobaleno cd 1997,with pianist Diane Andersen, enjoy more now than on first hearings, 14 Bagatelles,Op.6 ( 2008 ), 4 Dirges, Op.8 (?),Improvisations,Op.20 (1920 ) , and Piano Sonata ( 1926 ). The earlier works bear and require repeated hearings.
Bozo
2019-09-22 16:30:50 UTC
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..14 Bagatelles,Op.6 ( 2008 )..
1908.
Bozo
2019-09-22 16:35:30 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Bartok solo piano miniatures and sonata, Arcobaleno cd 1997,with pianist Diane Andersen,
The cd cheap at Amazon -US:

https://tinyurl.com/y6h23ez9
Tatonik
2019-09-22 19:58:26 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Post by HT
Poulenc. Most of his piano music by several pianists - as well as
several concertos. Poulenc is one of the very few composers who never
bores me.
Largely agree.
To my knowledge, first Poulenc I heard was his Piano Concerto ( for solo
piano ) played by Ozan Marsh,pianist, with NY Phil,Andre Kostelanetz
conductor, live at then Philharmonic Hall, in NYC,Summer 1964, when I was
16.
When I played trombone in a (very) amateur trio, one piece we tackled
was Poulenc's Sonata for Horn, Trombone and Trumpet. I always thought
it had a lot of character for a short piece that didn't require
virtuosi. It's nice to find music written expressly for brass groups
rather than the endless arrangements one tends to hear on brass albums.

About the same time I hunted down a recording of it at Rose Records, the
only one I could find. It was a two-disc set of Poulenc chamber music
on EMI. I'm not sure how many recordings of the sonata are out there.
This one featured Alan Civil on horn, John Wilbraham on trumpet, and
John Iveson on trombone.

(I can identify all the CDs I bought during the era of the
brick-and-mortar record store because those are the ones that don't
exhibit the inevitable damage from shipping in indifferent packaging
from Amazon.)
Bozo
2019-09-22 20:10:18 UTC
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Post by Tatonik
When I played trombone in a (very) amateur trio, one piece we tackled
was Poulenc's Sonata for Horn, Trombone and Trumpet. I always thought
it had a lot of character for a short piece that didn't require
virtuosi.
Thanks, I'll look for it at YT.
Bozo
2019-09-23 22:20:42 UTC
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The Korngold piano sonatas, mine the Chandos cd by the late Geoffrey Tozer, here a different pianist:



Not great or memorable music, BUT worth the listen as Nos.1 and 2 were written when he was 11-13, remarkable, stand up well to No.3 when he was about 34. Schnabel (!) played, advocated,for awhile, No.2.
O
2019-09-24 16:48:44 UTC
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Not for the Never-Steel-Guitar Bunch:

In honor of Ken Burns' new program on Country Music, I've been
listening to John Prine's "For Better, Or Worse"

These are old familiar duets about love (or lost love) and marriage,
and have a deeply bittersweet, nostalgic theme running through them.
Prine's voice has been roughened by illness and surgeries, but somehow
it just enhances the effect. He's also helped by an array of
Nashville's finest women singers. It's very hard to listen to this
album and not have one or more of the tunes running through your head
afterwards.

On Spotify:

<https://open.spotify.com/album/1bf1EYVB9GkgDkbGTrSiyT?si=IRN6Gi4YSNyXsg
HN8cw5lQ>

-Owen
Bozo
2019-09-25 00:07:56 UTC
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Piano music of Guy Sacre ( 1948 - ),pianist Billy Eidi,Timpani cd :



An acquired taste, best about 2 works at a time, then the Preludes complete,repeated hearings needed, but rewarding, for me.With the Chopin, Faure , Shostakovich preludes, Prokofieff "Visions" earlier, some courage to do his own 24 preludes ca. 1989, Sacre closer to Prokofieff, with an occasional nod to the others ( I think ).
Bozo
2019-09-25 01:11:39 UTC
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Post by Tatonik
When I played trombone in a (very) amateur trio, one piece we tackled
was Poulenc's Sonata for Horn, Trombone and Trumpet. I always thought
it had a lot of character for a short piece that didn't require
virtuosi. It's nice to find music written expressly for brass groups
rather than the endless arrangements one tends to hear on brass albums.
About the same time I hunted down a recording of it at Rose Records, the
only one I could find. It was a two-disc set of Poulenc chamber music
on EMI. I'm not sure how many recordings of the sonata are out there.
Speaking of that Poulenc trio, today on BBC R3 a recording by the Nash Ensemble ( cd label not given ) , about 43:30 in to the broadcast.My first hearing of this 10 -minute work , thanks again.Even when at his most gregarious,there often seems a dark thread in a Poulenc work.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/m0008q8w
Tatonik
2019-10-01 10:02:55 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Post by Tatonik
When I played trombone in a (very) amateur trio, one piece we tackled
was Poulenc's Sonata for Horn, Trombone and Trumpet. I always thought
it had a lot of character for a short piece that didn't require
virtuosi. It's nice to find music written expressly for brass groups
rather than the endless arrangements one tends to hear on brass albums.
About the same time I hunted down a recording of it at Rose Records, the
only one I could find. It was a two-disc set of Poulenc chamber music
on EMI. I'm not sure how many recordings of the sonata are out there.
Speaking of that Poulenc trio, today on BBC R3 a recording by the Nash
Ensemble ( cd label not given ) , about 43:30 in to the broadcast.My first
hearing of this 10 -minute work , thanks again.Even when at his most
gregarious,there often seems a dark thread in a Poulenc work.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/m0008q8w
I'm listening to WFMT in the early hours of the morning, and right now
they're playing Poulenc's Aubade (Morning Song) for piano and 18
instruments. The announcer said it was initially conceived as a ballet
and evolved into its present form. It was written for a viscount and
viscountess.

I like what I hear so far. It begins rather darkly.

A few days ago I listened to my album of Poulenc chamber music again.
Perhaps the most distinctive work on it is the Sonata for Flute and
Piano (1958). This recording features Michel Debost on flute, Jacques
Février on piano.
JohnGavin
2019-10-01 12:26:36 UTC
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My vote goes to the Clarinet Sonata, although the Flute Sonata is also wonderful. His a capella choral music is sublime.
Bozo
2019-10-01 20:40:48 UTC
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Post by Tatonik
A few days ago I listened to my album of Poulenc chamber music again.
Perhaps the most distinctive work on it is the Sonata for Flute and
Piano (1958). This recording features Michel Debost on flute, Jacques
Février on piano.
I dont have yours, but here's another good one : http://tinyurl.com/bk3zy2k
Tatonik
2019-10-01 10:26:33 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Post by Tatonik
When I played trombone in a (very) amateur trio, one piece we tackled
was Poulenc's Sonata for Horn, Trombone and Trumpet. I always thought
it had a lot of character for a short piece that didn't require
virtuosi. It's nice to find music written expressly for brass groups
rather than the endless arrangements one tends to hear on brass albums.
About the same time I hunted down a recording of it at Rose Records, the
only one I could find. It was a two-disc set of Poulenc chamber music
on EMI. I'm not sure how many recordings of the sonata are out there.
Speaking of that Poulenc trio, today on BBC R3 a recording by the Nash
Ensemble ( cd label not given ) , about 43:30 in to the broadcast.My first
hearing of this 10 -minute work , thanks again.Even when at his most
gregarious,there often seems a dark thread in a Poulenc work.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/m0008q8w
Just listened to the Nash Ensemble. Thanks for pointing it out. My
impression is that they are smoother and more brilliant than the group
on my recording, and that they characterize each section more strongly.
They underline the irony in the piece.
Tatonik
2019-10-01 10:36:10 UTC
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Post by Tatonik
Post by Bozo
Post by Tatonik
When I played trombone in a (very) amateur trio, one piece we tackled
was Poulenc's Sonata for Horn, Trombone and Trumpet. I always thought
it had a lot of character for a short piece that didn't require
virtuosi. It's nice to find music written expressly for brass groups
rather than the endless arrangements one tends to hear on brass albums.
About the same time I hunted down a recording of it at Rose Records, the
only one I could find. It was a two-disc set of Poulenc chamber music
on EMI. I'm not sure how many recordings of the sonata are out there.
Speaking of that Poulenc trio, today on BBC R3 a recording by the Nash
Ensemble ( cd label not given ) , about 43:30 in to the broadcast.My first
hearing of this 10 -minute work , thanks again.Even when at his most
gregarious,there often seems a dark thread in a Poulenc work.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/m0008q8w
Just listened to the Nash Ensemble. Thanks for pointing it out. My
impression is that they are smoother and more brilliant than the group
on my recording, and that they characterize each section more strongly.
They underline the irony in the piece.
Another adjective that comes to mind when hearing Nash play here is
"suave." That description could fit many virtuoso brass groups. Some
actually seem too suave for their own good.
Steven Bornfeld
2019-09-16 19:41:48 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Villa-Lobos, complete music for solo guitar,Norbert Kraft,Naxos.Sine qua non for me.
Kraft is indeed very good. His talents as a guitarist have sometimes
been overshadowed by his work as a producer of Naxos's guitar
collection. Many of recordings in this series have been criticized for
their "dry" sound. Certainly, for anyone used to listening to the
recordings of Segovia or Bream, these recordings do seem dry (I think
the Bream recording of the HVL Prelues mentioned by Number Six may have
been the very first classical guitar recording I ever bought).
Personally, I've come to prefer less reverb for much of the repertoire.

Steve
Lawrence Chalmers
2019-09-17 17:44:44 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Had not head these in my collection for awhile, glad I listened today. Pianist Boren has recorded the 2 Vine works on an Enharmonic cd I have, here he and another pianist both live; my Lilburn the YT Poynton recording on a download I purchased ; my Williamson on a complete Hyperion cd set of his piano concerti played by Piers Lane, here a recording with the composer as soloist.
http://youtu.be/fFqJKPg2yaE ( “Anne Landa “ Preludes )
http://youtu.be/ADx3tZ0yxr0 (Piano Sonata No.3 )
Piano Sonata No.1
http://youtu.be/nxQth3dru_I
http://youtu.be/YSnwn1LUpnE
http://youtu.be/dMmsWgG8S8Y
Piano Concerto No. 2
http://youtu.be/C0owk-BgiA8 ( “ Surprising “ slow mov. given rest of the work )
Guilty pleasure: a lot of electronic music by Klaus Schulze, especially his earlier ventures fron various volumes in the "La Vie Electronique" series.
Lawrence Chalmers
2019-09-25 02:37:59 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Had not head these in my collection for awhile, glad I listened today. Pianist Boren has recorded the 2 Vine works on an Enharmonic cd I have, here he and another pianist both live; my Lilburn the YT Poynton recording on a download I purchased ; my Williamson on a complete Hyperion cd set of his piano concerti played by Piers Lane, here a recording with the composer as soloist.
http://youtu.be/fFqJKPg2yaE ( “Anne Landa “ Preludes )
http://youtu.be/ADx3tZ0yxr0 (Piano Sonata No.3 )
Piano Sonata No.1
http://youtu.be/nxQth3dru_I
http://youtu.be/YSnwn1LUpnE
http://youtu.be/dMmsWgG8S8Y
Piano Concerto No. 2
http://youtu.be/C0owk-BgiA8 ( “ Surprising “ slow mov. given rest of the work )
Bozo
2019-09-27 20:28:39 UTC
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Leif Ove Andsnes playing solo works of Carl Nielsen,Virgin Classics cd 1996.Have had the cd quite some time,but despite repeated hearings never warmed to the music until now.Have not found much other Nielsen music of any kind to my taste , but obviously I'm in a very small minority.
Frank Berger
2019-09-27 20:40:01 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Leif Ove Andsnes playing solo works of Carl Nielsen,Virgin Classics cd 1996.Have had the cd quite some time,but despite repeated hearings never warmed to the music until now.Have not found much other Nielsen music of any kind to my taste , but obviously I'm in a very small minority.
Not a day goes by where I don't thank (fill-in of your choice) that my
taste is pretty far-ranging. There are lots of works I don't like, but
not too many genres or even composers. Repeated listening is often the
key to gaining appreciation, but a lot of people think it's nuts to
listen to stuff you don't like. Heck, that's how I came to appreciate
classical music in the first place. One genre that in general I can't
stand is Israeli popular secular music. I prefer hip hop and rap to that.
Bozo
2019-09-27 22:32:29 UTC
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Post by Frank Berger
Repeated listening is often the
key to gaining appreciation, but a lot of people think it's nuts to
listen to stuff you don't like.
Repeated listening has been yielding more dividends recently than I anticipated. While aging does not necessarily make one wiser, perhaps additional cumulative exposure to life , and the natural environment , in general , may heighten,broaden ones emotional receptivity ( for me the key to music "appreciation") ? Even the onset of ones dotage may help simplify that which youth finds more complicated ?

Or, perhaps the more I observe mankind's self-inflicted wounds ( climate change, Trump, mass shootings, famines, et.al. ), the more leeway I am willing to give any composer's efforts ?

Or,perhaps it's my relatively recent switch from cheap cabernet to cheap shiraz ?
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