Discussion:
ANDRE WATTS
(too old to reply)
Tom Deacon
2004-08-11 12:28:33 UTC
Permalink
Has anyone heard Andre Watts recently? A while back he suffered an aneurism,
I believe. Since that news report, I have not heard a single word about him.

TD
Martha & Russ Oppenheim
2004-08-11 15:19:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tom Deacon
Has anyone heard Andre Watts recently? A while back he suffered an aneurism,
I believe. Since that news report, I have not heard a single word about him.
Had surgery for a subdural hematoma back in Dec 2002. Seems to be
playing again, I saw an article that he was subbing for an ailing Lang
Lang in February of this year.
Dan Koren
2004-08-11 16:53:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Martha & Russ Oppenheim
Post by Tom Deacon
Has anyone heard Andre Watts recently? A
while back he suffered an aneurism,
I believe. Since that news report,
I have not heard a single word about
him.
Had surgery for a subdural hematoma back in
Dec 2002. Seems to be playing again, I saw
an article that he was subbing for an ailing
Lang Lang in February of this year.
Unbelievable! What has the world come to.

Andre Watts subbing for Lang Lang?

Outrageous!



dk
Tom Deacon
2004-08-12 00:50:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan Koren
Post by Martha & Russ Oppenheim
Post by Tom Deacon
Has anyone heard Andre Watts recently? A
while back he suffered an aneurism,
I believe. Since that news report,
I have not heard a single word about
him.
Had surgery for a subdural hematoma back in
Dec 2002. Seems to be playing again, I saw
an article that he was subbing for an ailing
Lang Lang in February of this year.
Unbelievable! What has the world come to.
Andre Watts subbing for Lang Lang?
Outrageous!
My thoughts precisely!

TD
J. Tati
2004-08-14 05:55:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan Koren
Post by Martha & Russ Oppenheim
Post by Tom Deacon
Has anyone heard Andre Watts recently? A
while back he suffered an aneurism,
I believe. Since that news report,
I have not heard a single word about
him.
Had surgery for a subdural hematoma back in
Dec 2002. Seems to be playing again, I saw
an article that he was subbing for an ailing
Lang Lang in February of this year.
Unbelievable! What has the world come to.
Andre Watts subbing for Lang Lang?
Outrageous!
dk
What, did Lang Lang hit his head on the piano or something.
Owen Hartnett
2004-08-12 00:27:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Martha & Russ Oppenheim
Post by Tom Deacon
Has anyone heard Andre Watts recently? A while back he suffered an aneurism,
I believe. Since that news report, I have not heard a single word about him.
Had surgery for a subdural hematoma back in Dec 2002. Seems to be
playing again, I saw an article that he was subbing for an ailing Lang
Lang in February of this year.
He's joined the faculty at Indiana University, and I believe will be
giving concerts there, as well.

-Owen
John Gavin
2004-08-11 18:09:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tom Deacon
Has anyone heard Andre Watts recently? A while back he suffered an aneurism,
I believe. Since that news report, I have not heard a single word about him.
TD
Another Watts factoid - he will begin teaching at U. Indiana
Bloomington in September.
Dan Koren
2004-08-11 18:30:44 UTC
Permalink
And where is Tzimo Barto these days?

He doesn't seem to have recorded at
all lately. Has he joined father
Kars? ;-)



dk
Henk van Tuijl
2004-08-11 18:51:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan Koren
And where is Tzimo Barto these days?
He doesn't seem to have recorded at
all lately. Has he joined father
Kars? ;-)
Hasn't he become a weight lifter, or
something like Arnold Schwarzenegger
- in his good days?

Henk
Adam M. Dubin
2004-08-12 18:42:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan Koren
And where is Tzimo Barto these days?
He doesn't seem to have recorded at
all lately. Has he joined father
Kars? ;-)
dk
I was told (by my former piano teacher) that his performance this past
season of the Brahms Second concerto with the Philadelphia Orchestra
(cond. by Eschenbach) was wretched.

Adam
Barry Zukerman
2004-08-12 22:18:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Adam M. Dubin
Post by Dan Koren
And where is Tzimo Barto these days?
He doesn't seem to have recorded at
all lately. Has he joined father
Kars? ;-)
dk
I was told (by my former piano teacher) that his performance this past
season of the Brahms Second concerto with the Philadelphia Orchestra
(cond. by Eschenbach) was wretched.
Adam
I missed that program, but he received one of the most strongly
negative reviews I've ever seen given to a visiting soloist in the
Philadelphia Inquirer.
Barry
Tom Deacon
2004-08-13 00:06:33 UTC
Permalink
On 8/12/04 6:18 PM, in article
Post by Barry Zukerman
Post by Adam M. Dubin
I was told (by my former piano teacher) that his performance this past
season of the Brahms Second concerto with the Philadelphia Orchestra
(cond. by Eschenbach) was wretched.
Adam
I missed that program, but he received one of the most strongly
negative reviews I've ever seen given to a visiting soloist in the
Philadelphia Inquirer.
Strange.

Joe Weider told me it was a hell of a performance.

TD
Peter Schenkman
2004-08-11 18:26:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tom Deacon
Has anyone heard Andre Watts recently? A while back he suffered an aneurism,
I believe. Since that news report, I have not heard a single word about him.
TD
Watts to fill new endowed chair position
BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- To put it musically, it's a perfect arrangement.

The Indiana University School of Music announced the appointments
today (May 6) of two of the world's greatest living pianists, André
Watts and Arnaldo Cohen, to its faculty. Watts will fill the newly
created Jack I. and Dora B. Hamlin Endowed Chair in Music. He and
Cohen will begin teaching at the school in the fall.

Peter Schenkman
Tom Deacon
2004-08-12 00:52:47 UTC
Permalink
On 8/11/04 2:26 PM, in article
Post by Peter Schenkman
Post by Tom Deacon
Has anyone heard Andre Watts recently? A while back he suffered an aneurism,
I believe. Since that news report, I have not heard a single word about him.
TD
Watts to fill new endowed chair position
BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- To put it musically, it's a perfect arrangement.
The Indiana University School of Music announced the appointments
today (May 6) of two of the world's greatest living pianists, André
Watts and Arnaldo Cohen, to its faculty. Watts will fill the newly
created Jack I. and Dora B. Hamlin Endowed Chair in Music. He and
Cohen will begin teaching at the school in the fall.
Peter Schenkman
This is rather sad news, Peter.

The idea that Watts is teaching in the piano factory in Illinois means that
his illness has affected in a very real way his ability to perform. This guy
is a born performer. Not that he might not also be a good teacher, of
course, but he was born to play the piano.

As for Cohen, he has found his true niche.

TD
LaVirtuosa
2004-08-12 05:03:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tom Deacon
The idea that Watts is teaching in the piano factory in Illinois means that
his illness has affected in a very real way his ability to perform. This guy
is a born performer. Not that he might not also be a good teacher, of
course, but he was born to play the piano.
Perhaps. Everybody teaches. Toradze is a famous teacher. Indiana isn't far
from Milwaukee; maybe Watts will do some shorter tours up towards Wisconsin.
That would be cool. I've always found the way he mounts certain kinds of
technical hurdles fascinating to watch.

Just a note--Watts has been supportive to a large number of worthy causes by
giving benefit concerts.

**********Val
Post by Tom Deacon
This is rather sad news, Peter.
The idea that Watts is teaching in the piano factory in Illinois means that
his illness has affected in a very real way his ability to perform.
Tom Deacon
2004-08-12 09:27:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by LaVirtuosa
Post by Tom Deacon
The idea that Watts is teaching in the piano factory in Illinois means that
his illness has affected in a very real way his ability to perform. This guy
is a born performer. Not that he might not also be a good teacher, of
course, but he was born to play the piano.
Perhaps. Everybody teaches.
That, of course, is not really true, Val. Rubinstein didn't teach.
Cherkassky didn't teach.

Special master classes are one thing. But a steady teaching job can be
totally draining on a performing artist. In my opinion.
Post by LaVirtuosa
Toradze is a famous teacher.
He plays a better Petroushka.
Post by LaVirtuosa
Indiana isn't far from Milwaukee; maybe Watts will do some shorter tours up
towards Wisconsin. That would be cool. I've always found the way he mounts
certain kinds of technical hurdles fascinating to watch.

That would be nice for you, of course, but I imagine that he hasn't been
absent from Milwaukee over the years anyway.
Post by LaVirtuosa
Just a note--Watts has been supportive to a large number of worthy causes by
giving benefit concerts.
I am well aware of this, Val.

TD
Martha & Russ Oppenheim
2004-08-12 12:49:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tom Deacon
Post by LaVirtuosa
Post by Tom Deacon
The idea that Watts is teaching in the piano factory in Illinois means that
his illness has affected in a very real way his ability to perform. This guy
is a born performer. Not that he might not also be a good teacher, of
course, but he was born to play the piano.
Perhaps. Everybody teaches.
That, of course, is not really true, Val. Rubinstein didn't teach.
Cherkassky didn't teach.
Nor did Richter, I believe.
benjo maso
2004-08-12 13:03:47 UTC
Permalink
On 8/12/04 1:03 AM, in article
Post by LaVirtuosa
Post by Tom Deacon
The idea that Watts is teaching in the piano factory in Illinois means that
his illness has affected in a very real way his ability to perform. This guy
is a born performer. Not that he might not also be a good teacher, of
course, but he was born to play the piano.
Perhaps. Everybody teaches.
That, of course, is not really true, Val. Rubinstein didn't teach.
Cherkassky didn't teach.
Rubinstein gave master classes.

Benjo Maso
Matthew B. Tepper
2004-08-12 14:35:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by benjo maso
Rubinstein gave master classes.
He also had, ahem, a protegée, Janina Fialkowska.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Take THAT, Daniel Lin, Mark Sadek, James Lin & Christopher Chung!
Sol L. Siegel
2004-08-12 14:48:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by benjo maso
Rubinstein gave master classes.
He also had, ahem, a protegée, Janina Fialkowska.
...whose recordings are worth seeking out.

-Sol Siegel, Philadelphia, PA
--------------------
"I really liked it. Even the music was good." - Yogi Berra, after seeing
"Tosca"
--------------------
(Remove "exitspam" from the end of my e-mail address to respond.)
Matthew B. Tepper
2004-08-12 19:29:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sol L. Siegel
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by benjo maso
Rubinstein gave master classes.
He also had, ahem, a protegée, Janina Fialkowska.
...whose recordings are worth seeking out.
She didn't make a whole lot of them; which would you most recommend?
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Take THAT, Daniel Lin, Mark Sadek, James Lin & Christopher Chung!
Tom Deacon
2004-08-12 23:19:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Sol L. Siegel
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by benjo maso
Rubinstein gave master classes.
He also had, ahem, a protegée, Janina Fialkowska.
...whose recordings are worth seeking out.
She didn't make a whole lot of them; which would you most recommend?
There are far too many of them available here in Canada. Avoid her
Transcendental Etudes. Another attempt to drive a Mack truck through this
music.

TD
Dan Koren
2004-08-13 02:43:57 UTC
Permalink
On 8/12/04 3:29 PM, in article
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Sol L. Siegel
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by benjo maso
Rubinstein gave master classes.
He also had, ahem, a protegée, Janina Fialkowska.
...whose recordings are worth seeking out.
She didn't make a whole lot of them; which would you most recommend?
There are far too many of them available here in Canada. Avoid her
Transcendental Etudes. Another attempt to drive a Mack truck through this
music.
If only she could drive a truck...

We're agreeing too much lately.

What have you been drinking?



dk
Dan Koren
2004-08-13 02:43:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Sol L. Siegel
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by benjo maso
Rubinstein gave master classes.
He also had, ahem, a protegée, Janina Fialkowska.
...whose recordings are worth seeking out.
She didn't make a whole lot of them; which would you most recommend?
None.

Or if you prefer, one of
the etudes CD (Chopin or
Liszt Transcendentals) as
examples of how not to.



dk
Tom Deacon
2004-08-15 14:01:03 UTC
Permalink
following
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Sol L. Siegel
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by benjo maso
Rubinstein gave master classes.
He also had, ahem, a protegée, Janina Fialkowska.
...whose recordings are worth seeking out.
She didn't make a whole lot of them; which would you most recommend?
None.
Or if you prefer, one of
the etudes CD (Chopin or
Liszt Transcendentals) as
examples of how not to.
There you go agreeing with me again. This just HAS to stop, Koren.

TD
Dan Koren
2004-08-15 18:56:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tom Deacon
following
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Sol L. Siegel
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by benjo maso
Rubinstein gave master classes.
He also had, ahem, a protegée, Janina Fialkowska.
...whose recordings are worth seeking out.
She didn't make a whole lot of them; which would you most recommend?
None.
Or if you prefer, one of
the etudes CD (Chopin or
Liszt Transcendentals) as
examples of how not to.
There you go agreeing with me
again. This just HAS to stop,
Koren.
I have a better idea. Let's turn this into a business.

You and I agree on so few things that the very few on
which we do agree must have extraordinary value indeed.

This could be turned into a valuable branding business:
Imagine with how much confidence music lovers could buy
new recordings if came with both Tom Deacon's *AND* Dan
Koren's imprimatur. We could probably put J.D. Powers
out of business withing a week.

As to the division of labor, it seems natural to suggest
you should focus on the business end of things (such as
contracts, licenses, packaging and distribution rights),
while I focus on listening.

Done deal?


dk
Tom Deacon
2004-08-15 20:01:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan Koren
Post by Tom Deacon
There you go agreeing with me
again. This just HAS to stop,
Koren.
I have a better idea. Let's turn this into a business.
You and I agree on so few things that the very few on
which we do agree must have extraordinary value indeed.
Imagine with how much confidence music lovers could buy
new recordings if came with both Tom Deacon's *AND* Dan
Koren's imprimatur. We could probably put J.D. Powers
out of business withing a week.
As to the division of labor, it seems natural to suggest
you should focus on the business end of things (such as
contracts, licenses, packaging and distribution rights),
while I focus on listening.
Done deal?
I am not sure all members of this forum would think so kindly of such an
undertaking. There have been aspersions cast on my competence, Koren. So,
perhaps, I am not the valued "partner" you are looking for in this instance.
But for further advice on the issue I suggest that you consult Golescu,
Powell, Wilson, Tepper, Burns, et al.

I know how much you value the advice of such learned gentlemen and such
experienced business heads.

TD
Dan Koren
2004-08-15 20:43:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tom Deacon
Post by Dan Koren
Post by Tom Deacon
There you go agreeing with me
again. This just HAS to stop,
Koren.
I have a better idea. Let's turn this into a business.
You and I agree on so few things that the very few on
which we do agree must have extraordinary value indeed.
Imagine with how much confidence music lovers could buy
new recordings if came with both Tom Deacon's *AND* Dan
Koren's imprimatur. We could probably put J.D. Powers
out of business withing a week.
As to the division of labor, it seems natural to suggest
you should focus on the business end of things (such as
contracts, licenses, packaging and distribution rights),
while I focus on listening.
Done deal?
I am not sure all members of this forum would think so
kindly of such an undertaking. There have been aspersions
cast on my competence, Koren.
Not at all. No one here ever doubted your business acumen.

Which is why I trust you will eventually see the value of
my proposal.
Post by Tom Deacon
So, perhaps, I am not the valued "partner" you are looking
for in this instance. But for further advice on the issue I
suggest that you consult Golescu, Powell, Wilson, Tepper,
Burns, et al.
I know how much you value the advice of such learned
gentlemen and such experienced business heads.
I am not looking for advice. Just for a pair of old and
tried business hands.



dk
MrT
2004-08-16 02:33:49 UTC
Permalink
Wait a minute, you are forgetting something... It wouldn't be safe for
you in the shadeddog-eat-shadeddog world of music business without a
little protection by the Committee. They've even been known to offer
groups rates to couples.

Regards,

mr t
Tom Deacon
2004-08-16 12:37:16 UTC
Permalink
On 8/15/04 10:33 PM, in article
Post by MrT
Wait a minute, you are forgetting something... It wouldn't be safe for
you in the shadeddog-eat-shadeddog world of music business without a
little protection by the Committee. They've even been known to offer
groups rates to couples.
Thanks for the offer. But the music business has its own mafia.

TD
Owen Hartnett
2004-08-17 12:44:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tom Deacon
On 8/15/04 10:33 PM, in article
Post by MrT
Wait a minute, you are forgetting something... It wouldn't be safe for
you in the shadeddog-eat-shadeddog world of music business without a
little protection by the Committee. They've even been known to offer
groups rates to couples.
Thanks for the offer. But the music business has its own mafia.
Even if you don't like country music, the words from George Strait's
"Murder on Music Row" would find some sympathetic spirits from this
group.

-Owen
Dan Koren
2004-08-16 18:25:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by MrT
Wait a minute, you are forgetting something... It wouldn't be safe for
you in the shadeddog-eat-shadeddog world of music business without a
little protection by the Committee. They've even been known to offer
groups rates to couples.
I'm not interested in protection
from the committe or anyone else.



dk
LaVirtuosa
2004-08-13 05:41:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tom Deacon
Special master classes are one thing. But a steady teaching job can be
totally draining on a performing artist. In my opinion.
I think he should stay home and rework Brahms 2. Regenerate himself, and
maybe even learn some things from his students.

************Val
Tom Deacon
2004-08-13 10:42:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by LaVirtuosa
Post by Tom Deacon
Special master classes are one thing. But a steady teaching job can be
totally draining on a performing artist. In my opinion.
I think he should stay home and rework Brahms 2. Regenerate himself, and
maybe even learn some things from his students.
Watts gave one of the most amazing performances of Brahms 2 I have ever
heard, with Sir John Pritchard, in the UK.

The students, and maybe even his teacher, could learn a thing or two from a
tape of that performance.

TD
LaVirtuosa
2004-08-13 19:41:14 UTC
Permalink
He must have adjusted it then. For one thing, theres a unique feature in
Brahms 2 of inflection on the upbeat which was oddly missing awhile back. A
certain distinctness, or "bulk", if you will, which brings intensity to the
work, and which is, in fact, fairly easy to render, was not applied anywhere in
the piece at that time, making it sound feminine-I kid you not... But it would
not have been difficult to correct these details.

**************Val
Post by Tom Deacon
Watts gave one of the most amazing performances of Brahms 2 I have ever
heard, with Sir John Pritchard, in the UK.
The students, and maybe even his teacher, could learn a thing or two from a
tape of that performance.
Dan Koren
2004-08-13 17:29:58 UTC
Permalink
On 8/13/04 1:41 AM, in article
Post by LaVirtuosa
Post by Tom Deacon
Special master classes are one thing. But a steady teaching job can be
totally draining on a performing artist. In my opinion.
I think he should stay home and rework Brahms 2. Regenerate himself, and
maybe even learn some things from his students.
Watts gave one of the most amazing performances of Brahms 2 I have ever
heard, with Sir John Pritchard, in the UK.
The students, and maybe even his teacher, could learn a thing or two from a
tape of that performance.
Deacon,


You're stealing my ideas!



;-)




dk
Dan Koren
2004-08-13 06:14:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by LaVirtuosa
I think he should stay home and rework Brahms 2.
You gotta be kiding. Watts' is one of the finest
ever recorded. That he was all of 17 at the time
makes it even more extraordinary.
Post by LaVirtuosa
Regenerate himself, and maybe even learn some
things from his students.
Rx: Thorazine *and* Haloperidol.



dk
Tom Deacon
2004-08-15 14:38:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan Koren
Post by LaVirtuosa
I think he should stay home and rework Brahms 2.
You gotta be kiding. Watts' is one of the finest
ever recorded. That he was all of 17 at the time
makes it even more extraordinary.
And let's hope that the BBC releases that Watts/Pritchard performance. They
probably won't of course. They are not quite sure who Andre Watts IS at the
BBC, I would think.

TD
Dan Koren
2004-08-15 18:57:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tom Deacon
Post by Dan Koren
Post by LaVirtuosa
I think he should stay home and rework Brahms 2.
You gotta be kiding. Watts' is one of the finest
ever recorded. That he was all of 17 at the time
makes it even more extraordinary.
And let's hope that the BBC releases that Watts/
Pritchard performance. They probably won't of
course. They are not quite sure who Andre Watts
IS at the BBC, I would think.
The inventor of the steam engine?



dk
arri bachrach
2004-08-15 22:46:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tom Deacon
Post by Dan Koren
Post by LaVirtuosa
I think he should stay home and rework Brahms 2.
excellent idea
Post by Tom Deacon
Post by Dan Koren
You gotta be kiding. Watts' is one of the finest
ever recorded. That he was all of 17 at the time
makes it even more extraordinary.
And let's hope that the BBC releases that Watts/Pritchard performance. They
probably won't of course. They are not quite sure who Andre Watts IS at the
BBC, I would think.
TD
can't understand WATT all the fuss is about Watts.... vastly over
rated pianist IMO, heard him in recital and was not happy about his
phrasing and his general musicality.
His recent TV appearences with Lincoln Center players are a
disaster.... his technique is seriously diminished,(this even before
his stroke)

AB
arri bachrach
2004-08-15 22:46:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tom Deacon
Post by Dan Koren
Post by LaVirtuosa
I think he should stay home and rework Brahms 2.
excellent idea
Post by Tom Deacon
Post by Dan Koren
You gotta be kiding. Watts' is one of the finest
ever recorded. That he was all of 17 at the time
makes it even more extraordinary.
And let's hope that the BBC releases that Watts/Pritchard performance. They
probably won't of course. They are not quite sure who Andre Watts IS at the
BBC, I would think.
TD
can't understand WATT all the fuss is about Watts.... vastly over
rated pianist IMO, heard him in recital and was not happy about his
phrasing and his general musicality.
His recent TV appearences with Lincoln Center players are a
disaster.... his technique is seriously diminished,(this even before
his stroke)

AB
Dan Koren
2004-08-15 23:41:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by arri bachrach
can't understand WATT all the fuss is about Watts.... vastly over
rated pianist IMO, heard him in recital and was not happy about his
phrasing and his general musicality.
His recent TV appearences with Lincoln Center players are a
disaster.... his technique is seriously diminished,(this even before
his stroke)
You should have heard him when he
was in his teens/twenties.



dk
arri bachrach
2004-08-16 16:48:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan Koren
Post by arri bachrach
can't understand WATT all the fuss is about Watts.... vastly over
rated pianist IMO, heard him in recital and was not happy about his
phrasing and his general musicality.
His recent TV appearences with Lincoln Center players are a
disaster.... his technique is seriously diminished,(this even before
his stroke)
You should have heard him when he
was in his teens/twenties.
I heard him in recital when he was in his early 20s at Carnegie
Hall....... musically, a big disappoitnment and I don't remember being
especially awed by his technique which was was very good of course,
but not that outstanding

AB
Post by Dan Koren
dk
Tom Deacon
2004-08-16 17:55:29 UTC
Permalink
On 8/16/04 12:48 PM, in article
Post by arri bachrach
Post by Dan Koren
Post by arri bachrach
can't understand WATT all the fuss is about Watts.... vastly over
rated pianist IMO, heard him in recital and was not happy about his
phrasing and his general musicality.
His recent TV appearences with Lincoln Center players are a
disaster.... his technique is seriously diminished,(this even before
his stroke)
You should have heard him when he
was in his teens/twenties.
I heard him in recital when he was in his early 20s at Carnegie
Hall....... musically, a big disappoitnment and I don't remember being
especially awed by his technique which was was very good of course,
but not that outstanding
Of course not, Arri.

You only love the velvet-touch pianists.

It really does limit your scope, you know.

TD
arri bachrach
2004-08-17 16:20:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tom Deacon
Post by arri bachrach
I heard him in recital when he was in his early 20s at Carnegie
Hall....... musically, a big disappoitnment and I don't remember being
especially awed by his technique which was was very good of course,
but not that outstanding
Of course not, Arri.
You only love the velvet-touch pianists.
It really does limit your scope, you know.
TD
Hofmann, my all time favorite, "velvet-touch"? Kempff and Schnabal who
I also very much admire, vevlet- touch pianists????

AB
Dan Koren
2004-08-17 17:33:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by arri bachrach
Post by Tom Deacon
Post by arri bachrach
I heard him in recital when he was in his early 20s at Carnegie
Hall....... musically, a big disappoitnment and I don't remember being
especially awed by his technique which was was very good of course,
but not that outstanding
Of course not, Arri.
You only love the velvet-touch pianists.
It really does limit your scope, you know.
Hofmann, my all time favorite, "velvet-touch"?
Kempff and Schnabal who I also very much admire,
vevlet- touch pianists????
But of course.

You need to follow this diet for one year:

Morning: Richter Wilde Jagd (1946)
or Cziffra Mazeppa (1954)

Lunch: Sofronitsky Schumann op. 11

Dinner: Richter Bartok 2nd
or Prokofiev 5th

Supper: Sofronitsky Scriabin op. 42/5




dk
arri bachrach
2004-08-18 00:04:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan Koren
Post by arri bachrach
Post by Tom Deacon
It really does limit your scope, you know.
Hofmann, my all time favorite, "velvet-touch"?
Kempff and Schnabal who I also very much admire,
vevlet- touch pianists????
But of course.
Morning: Richter Wilde Jagd (1946)
or Cziffra Mazeppa (1954)
Lunch: Sofronitsky Schumann op. 11
Dinner: Richter Bartok 2nd
or Prokofiev 5th
Supper: Sofronitsky Scriabin op. 42/5
dk
agreed.. all of the above are very impressive, especially Cziffra.
Sofronitsky was recorded on awful pianos, even worse than Sanchez's
Iberia.....
I have about 10 CDs of Sofro........ tremendous intensity and
emotional power

AB
Ssg217
2004-08-18 00:08:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by arri bachrach
Sofronitsky was recorded on awful pianos, even worse than Sanchez's
Iberia.....
True, but we can still hear his phrasing & artistry, right? (-:
The old Igumnov's "The Seasons" were, I *believe*, recorded on an upright (!)
and they are still, well, not "the best", but the ones who inspire me most.
Post by arri bachrach
I have about 10 CDs of Sofro........ tremendous intensity and
emotional power
All true. A musician of fantastic imagination, emotional authenticity. . .
experiencing his playing in the concert hall must have been something apart.

regards,
SG
Dan Koren
2004-08-18 00:32:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ssg217
Post by arri bachrach
Sofronitsky was recorded on awful pianos,
even worse than Sanchez's Iberia.....
True, but we can still hear his phrasing &
Only because of my BMW.

The ultimate listening machine ;-)
Post by Ssg217
The old Igumnov's "The Seasons" were, I
*believe*, recorded on an upright (!) and
they are still, well, not "the best", but
the ones who inspire me most.
Post by arri bachrach
I have about 10 CDs of Sofro........
tremendous intensity and emotional power
Way too much for reasonable people to handle.
Every Sofronitsky CD should be taken with one
by Mme Strudel- Haebler.
Post by Ssg217
All true. A musician of fantastic imagination,
emotional authenticity. . . experiencing his
playing in the concert hall must have been
something apart.
I don't think one could get tickets without
the proper connections.



dk
Ssg217
2004-08-18 00:50:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan Koren
Every Sofronitsky CD should be taken with one
by Mme Strudel- Haebler.
LOL! You know, during Communist times in Romania, books were an extremely
praised commodity. You won't believe this, but people (me included) were so
bored that a huge Heidegger or Kleist or Marquez edition could be sold out in
one day, with people standing in huge bookstore lines! (I am not making this
up, it was what I call the paradoxal "good effects" of a rotten system, you
know like the Fascists who built solid highways.)

Anyway, my point was that alongside the much-wanted books there was a lot of
garbage -- Marx, Lenin, Ceaucescu, Zhdanov, Sartre and the translated
assortment of idiotic Western neo-Marxists -- that nobody wanted to buy and was
rotting ignored in the store. What do you figure? The bookstore chains came up
with an "ingenious" scheme: they were selling books in obligatory "packages".
In order to get one good book, one had to buy a "package" with four books, out
of which the buyer actually wanted one book, and the other three books --
Marxist, Bakuninist or any other type of worthless stinking garbage -- were
pushed on the buyer's throat. O tempora, o mores!

regards,
SG
Tom Deacon
2004-08-18 01:41:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ssg217
Post by Dan Koren
Every Sofronitsky CD should be taken with one
by Mme Strudel- Haebler.
LOL! You know, during Communist times in Romania, books were an extremely
praised commodity. You won't believe this, but people (me included) were so
bored that a huge Heidegger or Kleist or Marquez edition could be sold out in
one day, with people standing in huge bookstore lines! (I am not making this
up, it was what I call the paradoxal "good effects" of a rotten system, you
know like the Fascists who built solid highways.)
Anyway, my point was that alongside the much-wanted books there was a lot of
garbage -- Marx, Lenin, Ceaucescu, Zhdanov, Sartre and the translated
assortment of idiotic Western neo-Marxists -- that nobody wanted to buy and was
rotting ignored in the store. What do you figure? The bookstore chains came up
with an "ingenious" scheme: they were selling books in obligatory "packages".
In order to get one good book, one had to buy a "package" with four books, out
of which the buyer actually wanted one book, and the other three books --
Marxist, Bakuninist or any other type of worthless stinking garbage -- were
pushed on the buyer's throat. O tempora, o mores!
Ah. Where are the snows of yesteryear?

TD
Dan Koren
2004-08-18 01:56:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ssg217
In order to get one good book, one had to buy a
"package" with four books, out of which the buyer
actually wanted one book, and the other three books --
Marxist, Bakuninist or any other type of worthless
stinking garbage -- were pushed on the buyer's throat.
O tempora, o mores!
They must have stolen the idea
from the RCA Victor and Columbia
Record Clubs.



dk
Ssg217
2004-08-18 03:00:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan Koren
They must have stolen the idea
from the RCA Victor and Columbia
Record Clubs.
I don't know what to believe: are you misunderestimating the American values or
are you misoverestimating the Communist stupidity? Out of this dilemma you
can't get out, I say [see sigline, though].

regards,
SG

<<That ain't the American Way, buddy. With Lady Liberty standin' there in the
harbor, with her torch on high sayin' "Send me your poor, your deadbeats, your
filthy". And they all come spillin' in here, they come swarming in like ants...
your Spanish P.R.'s... your Japs, your Chinamen, your Krauts and your Hebes and
your English fruits. They all come spillin' in here where they're all free to
live in their own separate sections where they feel safe. And they'll bust your
head if you go in there. THAT'S what makes America beautiful, buddy.>>

Archie Bunker, American extraordinaire
Dan Koren
2004-08-18 04:22:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ssg217
Post by Dan Koren
They must have stolen the idea
from the RCA Victor and Columbia
Record Clubs.
I don't know what to believe: are
you misunderestimating the American
values or are you misoverestimating
the Communist stupidity? Out of this
dilemma you can't get out, I say
[see sigline, though].
Neither. Said methods were
invented and practiced long
before you were born.

Think Gillette.


dk
arri bachrach
2004-08-19 17:52:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by arri bachrach
Post by arri bachrach
Sofronitsky was recorded on awful pianos, even worse than Sanchez's
Iberia.....
correct......
Post by arri bachrach
I have about 10 CDs of Sofro........ tremendous intensity and
Post by arri bachrach
emotional power
All true. A musician of fantastic imagination, emotional authenticity. . .
experiencing his playing in the concert hall must have been something apart.
regards,
SG
agree absolutely. must have been quite an experience to be at his concerts.

AB
Tom Deacon
2004-08-17 21:22:08 UTC
Permalink
On 8/17/04 12:20 PM, in article
Post by arri bachrach
Post by Tom Deacon
Post by arri bachrach
I heard him in recital when he was in his early 20s at Carnegie
Hall....... musically, a big disappoitnment and I don't remember being
especially awed by his technique which was was very good of course,
but not that outstanding
Of course not, Arri.
You only love the velvet-touch pianists.
It really does limit your scope, you know.
TD
Hofmann, my all time favorite, "velvet-touch"? Kempff and Schnabal who
I also very much admire, vevlet- touch pianists????
What an insult! Putting Schnabel and Kempff in the same boat as Josef
Hofmann! This is really an outrage, Arri.

TD
Dan Koren
2004-08-18 00:28:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tom Deacon
On 8/17/04 12:20 PM, in article
Post by arri bachrach
Post by Tom Deacon
Post by arri bachrach
I heard him in recital when he was in his early 20s at Carnegie
Hall....... musically, a big disappoitnment and I don't remember being
especially awed by his technique which was was very good of course,
but not that outstanding
Of course not, Arri.
You only love the velvet-touch pianists.
It really does limit your scope, you know.
Hofmann, my all time favorite, "velvet-touch"? Kempff and Schnabal who
I also very much admire, vevlet- touch pianists????
What an insult! Putting Schnabel and Kempff in the same boat as Josef
Hofmann! This is really an outrage, Arri.
You know, people in tight quarters need to
make accomodations. Even go as far as sharing
a boat with someone one despises.

Incidentally, I very much doubt that Schnabel
would have shared *anything* with Kempff.



dk
arri bachrach
2004-08-19 17:56:03 UTC
Permalink
"> > > Hofmann, my all time favorite, "velvet-touch"? Kempff and
Schnabal who
Post by Dan Koren
Post by Tom Deacon
Post by arri bachrach
I also very much admire, vevlet- touch pianists????
What an insult! Putting Schnabel and Kempff in the same boat as Josef
Hofmann! This is really an outrage, Arri.
have heard worse "outrages" from you....
Post by Dan Koren
You know, people in tight quarters need to
make accomodations. Even go as far as sharing
a boat with someone one despises.
what about sharing a lifeboat???
Post by Dan Koren
Incidentally, I very much doubt that Schnabel
would have shared *anything* with Kempff.
I know nothing about Kempff's personal life or politics.... surely
must have different from Schnabel

AB
Post by Dan Koren
dk
Gerrit Stolte
2004-08-19 18:01:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by arri bachrach
I know nothing about Kempff's personal life or politics.... surely
must have different from Schnabel
He played quite a lot of left-hand piano music for some years.

Gerrit
--
"In Deutschland gilt derjenige als viel gefährlicher, der auf den Schmutz
hinweist als der, der ihn gemacht hat." (Carl von Ossietzky, 1889-1938)
Dan Koren
2004-08-16 18:27:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by arri bachrach
Post by Dan Koren
Post by arri bachrach
can't understand WATT all the fuss is about Watts.... vastly over
rated pianist IMO, heard him in recital and was not happy about his
phrasing and his general musicality.
His recent TV appearences with Lincoln Center players are a
disaster.... his technique is seriously diminished,(this even before
his stroke)
You should have heard him when he
was in his teens/twenties.
I heard him in recital when he was in his early 20s at Carnegie
Hall....... musically, a big disappoitnment and I don't remember being
especially awed by his technique which was was very good of course,
but not that outstanding
When you play the Brahms 2nd
like Watts we'll listen to
your opinions about piano
technique.



dk
arri bachrach
2004-08-16 23:50:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan Koren
Post by arri bachrach
I heard him in recital when he was in his early 20s at Carnegie
Hall....... musically, a big disappoitnment and I don't remember being
especially awed by his technique which was was very good of course,
but not that outstanding
When you play the Brahms 2nd
like Watts we'll listen to
your opinions about piano
technique.
dk
good point, and when you play the Brahms 1st concerto even as well as
Kempff we'll listen to YOUR opinions about anything relating to
classical music.
Did your idol Sanchez record it on a perfectly tuned beautiful
sounding piano?

AB
Sol L. Siegel
2004-08-12 14:51:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by LaVirtuosa
Indiana isn't far from Milwaukee; maybe Watts will do some
shorter tours up towards Wisconsin.
He's slated to do Mozart K271 here next March. Perhaps by
then the Orchestra will have a new contract.

-Sol Siegel, Philadelphia, PA
--------------------
"I really liked it. Even the music was good." - Yogi Berra, after seeing
"Tosca"
--------------------
(Remove "exitspam" from the end of my e-mail address to respond.)
Tom Deacon
2004-08-12 16:31:30 UTC
Permalink
On 8/12/04 10:51 AM, in article
Post by Sol L. Siegel
Post by LaVirtuosa
Indiana isn't far from Milwaukee; maybe Watts will do some
shorter tours up towards Wisconsin.
He's slated to do Mozart K271 here next March. Perhaps by
then the Orchestra will have a new contract.
I heard him do that concerto in Toronto about thirty odd years ago. It was
fabulous, perhaps the best I have ever heard it played.

TD
Bob Orr
2004-08-12 20:46:40 UTC
Permalink
There is likely more to Watts's appointment to the IU School of Music than
is being discussed here.

First, he is getting along in years and wanted to cut back on touring
somewhat - he is pushing 60 I believe. Second, he has been married to a
lady from Indianapolis - frequently visits the city and performs almost
annually with the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra to great public and
critical acclaim.

He did perform here after the surgery - instead of doing a new American
concerto though, he went back and reprised an earlier performance of the
MacDowell he had recorded for Telarc. He still has it!

Bob Orr
Post by LaVirtuosa
Post by Tom Deacon
The idea that Watts is teaching in the piano factory in Illinois means that
his illness has affected in a very real way his ability to perform. This guy
is a born performer. Not that he might not also be a good teacher, of
course, but he was born to play the piano.
Perhaps. Everybody teaches. Toradze is a famous teacher. Indiana isn't far
from Milwaukee; maybe Watts will do some shorter tours up towards Wisconsin.
That would be cool. I've always found the way he mounts certain kinds of
technical hurdles fascinating to watch.
Just a note--Watts has been supportive to a large number of worthy causes by
giving benefit concerts.
**********Val
Post by Tom Deacon
This is rather sad news, Peter.
The idea that Watts is teaching in the piano factory in Illinois means that
his illness has affected in a very real way his ability to perform.
Dan Koren
2004-08-13 02:46:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Orr
He did perform here after the surgery - instead of doing a new American
concerto though, he went back and reprised an earlier performance of the
MacDowell he had recorded for Telarc. He still has it!
Good to hear.

I count myself lucky to have heard the
McDowell performed live by both Watts
and Cliburn at their peaks during the
'60s.



dk
Norman Schwartz
2004-08-13 00:02:53 UTC
Permalink
http://www.bardavon.org/ev_dir/sub_preview.php?id=144
Norman Schwartz
2004-08-13 00:09:22 UTC
Permalink
http://www.cramermarderartists.com/watts.htm
Post by Norman Schwartz
http://www.bardavon.org/ev_dir/sub_preview.php?id=144
LaVirtuosa
2004-08-12 04:40:14 UTC
Permalink
http://news.minnesota.publicradio.org/features/2004/07/23_randolpht_oldfriends/
Post by Tom Deacon
Has anyone heard Andre Watts recently? A while back he suffered an aneurism,
I believe. Since that news report, I have not heard a single word about him.
TD
Begarv
2004-08-12 22:55:30 UTC
Permalink
The recent illness endured by Watts may not be affecting him too
badly. He is playing the Brahms 1st Concerto tomorrow night (Friday,
August 13) with the Philadelphia Orchestra at Saratoga and the
MacDowell 2nd on Sunday with the Boston Symphony at Tanglewood.
Also, I must disagree with the earlier post insinuating that
Arnaldo Cohen is best left to a teaching position. Having heard him in
concert three times, I would describe him as a suberb and exciting
pianist and a great favorite with the audience.
Tom Deacon
2004-08-12 23:18:26 UTC
Permalink
On 8/12/04 6:55 PM, in article
Post by Begarv
Also, I must disagree with the earlier post insinuating that
Arnaldo Cohen is best left to a teaching position. Having heard him in
concert three times, I would describe him as a suberb and exciting
pianist and a great favorite with the audience.
Mr Cohen seems to be juggling several careers. He was a reporter for the
Brazilian version of Time magazine until he was fired after a self-serving
article he wrote about great pianists.

Now he has taken on a teaching position. I can attest to the fact that he
speaks understandable English, so his students in Indiana should at least be
able to comprehend his instructions.

And then, of course, he has his brilliant world-renowned career as a concert
virtuoso.

Three hats. All at once. That's a hat-trick, isn't it?

TD
LaVirtuosa
2004-08-13 06:31:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tom Deacon
Mr Cohen seems to be juggling several careers. He was a reporter for the
Brazilian version of Time magazine until he was fired after a self-serving
article he wrote about great pianists.
Now he has taken on a teaching position. I can attest to the fact that he
speaks understandable English, so his students in Indiana should at least be
able to comprehend his instructions.
And then, of course, he has his brilliant world-renowned career as a concert
virtuoso.
Three hats. All at once. That's a hat-trick, isn't it?
TD
It all seems focused on his concert career, if indirectly. I still have yet to
hear his recordings.

Back to Watts, I would gather that he's not a *natural* pianist, from an old
interview I read, as well as something that was said just before a televised
Rach 2, where the announcer said something about how hard Watts works.

He stated once that had to go back and work on things, such as, perhaps, a
trill.

***********Val
Dan Koren
2004-08-13 07:40:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by LaVirtuosa
Back to Watts, I would gather that he's not a
*natural* pianist, from an old interview I read,
as well as something that was said just before a
televised Rach 2, where the announcer said something
about how hard Watts works.
Your disconnection from reality is something to
behold. Andre Watts has one of the most natural
pianistic mechanisms that has ever been observed.

Do yourself a favor and search your local library
for a tape of one of Lenny's "Young People Concerts"
programs featuring Watts in the 1st movement of the
Brahms 2nd. Watch his hands and report back to the
group.




dk
John Gavin
2004-08-18 13:15:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan Koren
Post by LaVirtuosa
Back to Watts, I would gather that he's not a
*natural* pianist, from an old interview I read,
as well as something that was said just before a
televised Rach 2, where the announcer said something
about how hard Watts works.
Your disconnection from reality is something to
behold. Andre Watts has one of the most natural
pianistic mechanisms that has ever been observed.
Not according to Andre Watts who has said that very little came
naturally and easily to him. He's had to work hard for everything
that he's accomplished.

Regarding Watts in general, I've seen him several times in recital -
he has always struck me as someone whose forte was projecting power
and bravura over depth or poetry. He's had a successful career as a
concert pianist which is saying alot, yet you can't help but wonder if
he's distinguished himself in a truly unique way. If you sift through
this site's archives you will notice that his name rarely comes up in
discussions of the best recorded versions of anything. Thinking back
on his discography, there were all-Beethoven, Schubert, Chopin, Liszt
and Gershwin recordings, but as far as I can tell, few of any at all
have survived, either on the shelves or in the minds of listeners.

If there is any single composer that is associated with Watts, it's
probably Liszt - so I'll ask the experts - is any of his Liszt
comparable with Cziffra's, Bolet's, Berman's? Do a search on Liszt
piano threads, and you'll see that Watts never comes up. Maybe it's
that curse of the American pianist, that was discussed earlier - no
lack of talent, yet a failure to make it into the ranks of the
immortals.
Ssg217
2004-08-18 15:49:56 UTC
Permalink
I've seen a video with Watts's Liszt Sonata and I found it very good, both
technically and musically, even if it didn't make it among my favorites.

regards,
SG
Hugh Roberts
2004-08-18 02:21:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tom Deacon
On 8/12/04 6:55 PM, in article
Post by Begarv
Also, I must disagree with the earlier post insinuating that
Arnaldo Cohen is best left to a teaching position. Having heard him in
concert three times, I would describe him as a suberb and exciting
pianist and a great favorite with the audience.
Mr Cohen seems to be juggling several careers. He was a reporter for the
Brazilian version of Time magazine until he was fired after a self-serving
article he wrote about great pianists.
Now he has taken on a teaching position. I can attest to the fact that he
speaks understandable English, so his students in Indiana should at least be
able to comprehend his instructions.
And then, of course, he has his brilliant world-renowned career as a concert
virtuoso.
Three hats. All at once. That's a hat-trick, isn't it?
TD
I understand his earlier career was as a mathematician and physicist;
I hadn't heard the journalism story before.
"A superb and exciting pianist and a great favorite with the audience"
is certainly my impressions of him too from an Australian tour. For
recording, try his Liszt recordings for Naxos.
I have also seen him as a teacher in a master class here. He was,
again, inspiring to both pupils and audience.
Incidentally, he is one of those musicians who can play a complex work
from memory after one sight-reading. I saw him do it in the master
class with a Moskowski concert etude.
Hugh Roberts
Matthew B. Tepper
2004-08-18 03:53:47 UTC
Permalink
I understand his [Arnaldo Cohen's] earlier career was as a mathematician
and physicist; I hadn't heard the journalism story before.
"A superb and exciting pianist and a great favorite with the audience"
is certainly my impressions of him too from an Australian tour. For
recording, try his Liszt recordings for Naxos.
I have also seen him as a teacher in a master class here. He was,
again, inspiring to both pupils and audience.
Incidentally, he is one of those musicians who can play a complex work
from memory after one sight-reading. I saw him do it in the master
class with a Moskowski concert etude.
Isn't there a Russian pianist whose more profitable day job is that of
motivational speaker?
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Take THAT, Daniel Lin, Mark Sadek, James Lin & Christopher Chung!
Dan Koren
2004-08-18 04:31:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Hugh Roberts
I understand his earlier career was
as a mathematician and physicist;
Actually, electrical engineering.

Physicists don't have enough time
to play music well.



dk
Hugh Roberts
2004-08-19 10:08:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan Koren
Post by Hugh Roberts
I understand his earlier career was
as a mathematician and physicist;
Actually, electrical engineering.
Thanks for the correction - my apologies.
Post by Dan Koren
Physicists don't have enough time
to play music well.
Your post implies nothing about the ability of electrical engineers to
play music well - right? :)

Hugh
Alan Watkins
2004-08-13 20:39:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Begarv
The recent illness endured by Watts may not be affecting him too
badly. He is playing the Brahms 1st Concerto tomorrow night (Friday,
August 13) with the Philadelphia Orchestra at Saratoga and the
MacDowell 2nd on Sunday with the Boston Symphony at Tanglewood.
Also, I must disagree with the earlier post insinuating that
Arnaldo Cohen is best left to a teaching position. Having heard him in
concert three times, I would describe him as a suberb and exciting
pianist and a great favorite with the audience.
Blimey! What on earth would the audience have anything to do with it.
What on earth do they know:):)

Kind regards,
Alan M. Watkins
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