Discussion:
Francescatti
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Dave Cook
2006-09-03 12:00:46 UTC
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Does anyone know what's on this CD?

http://www.hmv.co.jp/product/detail.asp?sku=146609

I can't quite make out the cover.

Also, any recommendations for other Francescatti recordings are welcome. I
have the Beethoven VC with Walter, the Brahms and Sibelius VCs with
Bernstein, and the Beethoven sonatas with Casadesus.

Unfortunately it looks like I missed out on the Masterworks Heritage set.
HMV has a rather pricy CD with his Saint-Saens and Paganini:

http://www.hmv.co.jp/product/detail.asp?sku=146595

HMV also has some Bach concertos on DG. Any good?

http://www.hmv.co.jp/product/detail.asp?sku=717581

Thanks,
Dave Cook
tomdeacon
2006-09-03 12:50:36 UTC
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Post by Dave Cook
Does anyone know what's on this CD?
http://www.hmv.co.jp/product/detail.asp?sku=146609
I can't quite make out the cover.
Also, any recommendations for other Francescatti recordings are welcome. I
have the Beethoven VC with Walter, the Brahms and Sibelius VCs with
Bernstein, and the Beethoven sonatas with Casadesus.
Unfortunately it looks like I missed out on the Masterworks Heritage set.
http://www.hmv.co.jp/product/detail.asp?sku=146595
HMV also has some Bach concertos on DG. Any good?
http://www.hmv.co.jp/product/detail.asp?sku=717581
Any good? Francescatti?

Good enough for Bruno Walter. Good enough for me.

If you like his sound, and it is distinctive, then you can't go wrong
in anything he did.

My only complaint is that he didn't do enough!!!

TD
makropulos
2006-09-03 13:21:43 UTC
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Permalink
If it's still available, the disc of Francescatti and Casadesus doing
the Brahms Sonatas is well worth getting. Likewise the Franck, Debussy,
and Fauré sonatas. They were all on Sony France reissues and a few
are still around. These are CDs I listen to over and over with the
greatest pleasure.
Post by tomdeacon
Post by Dave Cook
Does anyone know what's on this CD?
http://www.hmv.co.jp/product/detail.asp?sku=146609
I can't quite make out the cover.
Also, any recommendations for other Francescatti recordings are welcome. I
have the Beethoven VC with Walter, the Brahms and Sibelius VCs with
Bernstein, and the Beethoven sonatas with Casadesus.
Unfortunately it looks like I missed out on the Masterworks Heritage set.
http://www.hmv.co.jp/product/detail.asp?sku=146595
HMV also has some Bach concertos on DG. Any good?
http://www.hmv.co.jp/product/detail.asp?sku=717581
Any good? Francescatti?
Good enough for Bruno Walter. Good enough for me.
If you like his sound, and it is distinctive, then you can't go wrong
in anything he did.
My only complaint is that he didn't do enough!!!
TD
Dave Cook
2006-09-03 13:35:24 UTC
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Post by makropulos
If it's still available, the disc of Francescatti and Casadesus doing
the Brahms Sonatas is well worth getting. Likewise the Franck, Debussy,
and Fauré sonatas. They were all on Sony France reissues and a few
are still around. These are CDs I listen to over and over with the
greatest pleasure.
Sigh, all "Actuellement indisponible" at amazon.fr. I guess I missed the
boat on these reissues. Thanks, I'll keep looking for them.

Dave Cook
Alan Cooper
2006-09-03 15:24:53 UTC
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Permalink
Post by tomdeacon
Post by Dave Cook
Does anyone know what's on this CD?
http://www.hmv.co.jp/product/detail.asp?sku=146609
I can't quite make out the cover.
Also, any recommendations for other Francescatti recordings are welcome. I
have the Beethoven VC with Walter, the Brahms and Sibelius VCs with
Bernstein, and the Beethoven sonatas with Casadesus.
Unfortunately it looks like I missed out on the Masterworks Heritage set.
http://www.hmv.co.jp/product/detail.asp?sku=146595
HMV also has some Bach concertos on DG. Any good?
http://www.hmv.co.jp/product/detail.asp?sku=717581
Any good? Francescatti?
Good enough for Bruno Walter. Good enough for me.
If you like his sound, and it is distinctive, then you can't go wrong
in anything he did.
My only complaint is that he didn't do enough!!!
Agreed, with one caveat, and that is that imo he was past his prime
when he made those stereo concerto recordings for Columbia. To
supplement, try his Bach on Biddulph and/or Doremi, his Paganini
collection on Bridge, the Beethoven and Mozart concerti with Cluytens
on Doremi, the Saint-Saens 3rd Concerto with Mitropoulos on Sony, the
1946 recordings of the Franck and Debussy Sonatas with Casadesus
wherever you can find them, and the Symphonie espagnole with Cluytens
from the same year. Every one of those performances shows this great
artist at his best. Naturally they will be hard to find, on weird
labels, or simply op, alas.

AC
makropulos
2006-09-03 16:14:59 UTC
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Permalink
The good news seems to be that Biddulph is starting to reissue
Francescatti/Casadesus performances from the late 1940s and early 50s.
Post by Alan Cooper
Post by tomdeacon
My only complaint is that he didn't do enough!!!
Agreed, with one caveat, and that is that imo he was past his prime
when he made those stereo concerto recordings for Columbia. To
supplement, try his Bach on Biddulph and/or Doremi, his Paganini
collection on Bridge, the Beethoven and Mozart concerti with Cluytens
on Doremi, the Saint-Saens 3rd Concerto with Mitropoulos on Sony, the
1946 recordings of the Franck and Debussy Sonatas with Casadesus
wherever you can find them, and the Symphonie espagnole with Cluytens
from the same year. Every one of those performances shows this great
artist at his best. Naturally they will be hard to find, on weird
labels, or simply op, alas.
AC
Pabs
2006-09-03 13:34:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dave Cook
Does anyone know what's on this CD?
http://www.hmv.co.jp/product/detail.asp?sku=146609
I can't quite make out the cover.
Also, any recommendations for other Francescatti recordings are welcome. I
have the Beethoven VC with Walter, the Brahms and Sibelius VCs with
Bernstein, and the Beethoven sonatas with Casadesus.
Unfortunately it looks like I missed out on the Masterworks Heritage set.
http://www.hmv.co.jp/product/detail.asp?sku=146595
HMV also has some Bach concertos on DG. Any good?
http://www.hmv.co.jp/product/detail.asp?sku=717581
Thanks,
Dave Cook
If you like Francescatti's Paganini (and I do), try his live
all-Paganini recital at the Library of Congress from 1954 (Bridge
9125). It includes the D major Concerto, Caprices, Carnival of Venice,
and I Palpiti, all accompanied by Artur Balsam. Stylish and amazing
playing.

ds
Listener
2006-09-03 15:28:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dave Cook
Also, any recommendations for other Francescatti recordings are welcome. I
have the Beethoven VC with Walter, the Brahms and Sibelius VCs with
Bernstein, and the Beethoven sonatas with Casadesus.
Brahms Double Concerto with Fournier, Walter, Columbia SO

Bill
Matthew B. Tepper
2006-09-04 01:22:38 UTC
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Post by Listener
Post by Dave Cook
Also, any recommendations for other Francescatti recordings are welcome.
I have the Beethoven VC with Walter, the Brahms and Sibelius VCs with
Bernstein, and the Beethoven sonatas with Casadesus.
Brahms Double Concerto with Fournier, Walter, Columbia SO
Bernstein Serenade with the composer/New York Philharmonic. Past prime,
perhaps, but this was my imprint recording of the work.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
NOT an advocate of cannibalism (despite what Kevin Maroney says).
Dave Cook
2006-09-04 05:33:17 UTC
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Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Listener
Brahms Double Concerto with Fournier, Walter, Columbia SO
Bernstein Serenade with the composer/New York Philharmonic. Past prime,
perhaps, but this was my imprint recording of the work.
Oh, I got that one, too. Definitely better than the one with Stern. Guess
I'll go for that Brahms Double.

Dave Cook
Steve Emerson
2006-09-04 06:50:08 UTC
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It's a great shame that the sublime Fauré sonatas with Francescatti and
Casadesus have gone out of print. The 15 minutes or so during which they
remained available was, however, better than average for the Casadesus
Edition on French Sony that they belong to.

I see that Urania is bringing out, later this month, a F/C Fauré 1 c/w
their Franck. Pending the transfer, that sounds promising; although good
Fauré 1's are much more common than good 2's.

There's a Francescatti/Bagnoli Schubert Violin Fantasy that is among the
truly great performances thereof -- Peter Schenkman was good enough to
praise it here at one point. Unfortunately I don't think it's ever been
on CD. Vinyl is not terribly hard to find though; a Columbia mono LP
from early in the '50s.

SE.
d***@aol.com
2006-09-04 08:17:28 UTC
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Post by Steve Emerson
It's a great shame that the sublime Fauré sonatas with Francescatti and
Casadesus have gone out of print. The 15 minutes or so during which they
remained available was, however, better than average for the Casadesus
Edition on French Sony that they belong to.
Terrific series. I picked up almost the entire edition, and I'm glad I
did.

-david gable
tomdeacon
2006-09-04 10:40:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by d***@aol.com
Post by Steve Emerson
It's a great shame that the sublime Fauré sonatas with Francescatti and
Casadesus have gone out of print. The 15 minutes or so during which they
remained available was, however, better than average for the Casadesus
Edition on French Sony that they belong to.
Terrific series. I picked up almost the entire edition, and I'm glad I
did.
What made you stop before you got to the end?

They are all fine, in my opinion, and worth acquiring.

The only one which escaped by grasp was the Brahms 2, which was
announced and then withdrawn at the same time. Frustrating. It did,
however, manage to get to a few critics I know. I would love to know
the story behind that item.

TD
makropulos
2006-09-04 10:48:54 UTC
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Permalink
The Casadesus was a great series and I have been kicking myself for not
picking the one and only copy I ever saw of the 29-disc big box of the
whole thing (at Fnac in Les Halles) a couple of year back. Did that, I
wonder, include the Brahms B flat?

Needless to say, I didn't buy this box because I already had about half
of the edition and stupidly assumed I'd be able to find the rest as
single discs...
Post by tomdeacon
Post by d***@aol.com
Post by Steve Emerson
It's a great shame that the sublime Fauré sonatas with Francescatti and
Casadesus have gone out of print. The 15 minutes or so during which they
remained available was, however, better than average for the Casadesus
Edition on French Sony that they belong to.
Terrific series. I picked up almost the entire edition, and I'm glad I
did.
What made you stop before you got to the end?
They are all fine, in my opinion, and worth acquiring.
The only one which escaped by grasp was the Brahms 2, which was
announced and then withdrawn at the same time. Frustrating. It did,
however, manage to get to a few critics I know. I would love to know
the story behind that item.
TD
d***@aol.com
2006-09-04 19:12:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by tomdeacon
What made you stop before you got to the end?
At this point I can't remember. It could have been repertory that
didn't interest me or other demands made on my wallet.

-david gable
tomdeacon
2006-09-04 19:24:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by tomdeacon
What made you stop before you got to the end?
At this point I can't remember. It could have been repertory that didn't interest me or other demands made on my wallet.
Money concerns can be such a drag sometimes.

TD
m***@comcast.net
2006-09-04 15:34:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Steve Emerson
It's a great shame that the sublime Fauré sonatas with Francescatti and
Casadesus have gone out of print. The 15 minutes or so during which they
remained available was, however, better than average for the Casadesus
Edition on French Sony that they belong to.
I'm lucky to have these, in the French Sony "Les Absolus" 2-fer devoted
to Francescatti.

Marc Perman
Frank Berger
2006-09-04 17:21:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Steve Emerson
It's a great shame that the sublime Fauré sonatas with Francescatti and
Casadesus have gone out of print. The 15 minutes or so during which they
remained available was, however, better than average for the Casadesus
Edition on French Sony that they belong to.
I'm lucky to have these, in the French Sony "Les Absolus" 2-fer devoted
to Francescatti.

Marc Perman


Urania is releasing the Faure/Ravel 1st sonatas with Francescatti and
Casadesus on Sept. 26.
Fred Maroth
2006-09-03 17:51:19 UTC
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Permalink
Have you seen this? For more info go to http://www.musicandarts.com

CD-1171(4)* ZINO FRANCESCATTI IN PERFORMANCE: PREVIOUSLY UNISSUED

RECORDINGS.

CD 1 of 4 (1:08:10): Mozart: Violin Concerto in G Major, K216 (24:09)
(Orchestre de la Société des Concerts

du Conservatoire, Andre Cluytens, 11/13/46); Beethoven: Violin Concerto in D
Major, Op. 61 (43:55)

(Orchestre de la Société des Concerts du Conservatoire, Andre Cluytens,
11/13/46). CD 2 of 4 (1:12:55):

Brahms: Violin Concerto in D Major, Op. 77 (37:54); (ORTF, Erich Leinsdorf,
Lausanne, 5/23/69);

Tchaikovsky: Violin Concerto in D Major, Op. 35 (34:54) (ORTF, Paul Klecki,
5/5/70). CD 3 of 4 (1:16:25): Beethoven: Sonata

No. 7 in C Minor, Op. 30, No. 2 ( 24:14) (Robert Casadesus, 6/30/63);
Brahms: Sonata No. 3 in D Minor, Op. 108 (21:30)

(Eugenio Bagnoli, Besançon, 9/9/58); Prokofiev: Sonata No. 2 in D Major, Op.
94 (21:00) (Eugenio Bagnoli, Bordeaux, 5/9/61);

Ravel: Tzigane (9:23) (Eugenio Bagnoli, Besançon, 9/9/58). CD 4 of 4
(1:16:23): Bach: Partita No. 1 in B Minor, BWV 1002

(16:29) (Besançon, 9/9/58); Beethoven: Romances: No. 1 in G Major, Op. 40
and No. 2 in F Major, Op. 50 (14:56); (Eugenio

Bagnoli, Bordeaux, 5/9/61); Paganini: Il Palpiti, in A Major, Op. 13 (posth)
(8:18) (Eugenio Bagnoli, Bordeaux, 5/9/61); Saint-

Saens: Introduction et Rondo Capriciosso in A Minor, Op. 28 (9:27) (Eugenio
Bagnoli, Besançon, 9/9/58); Mendelssohn: Violin

Concerto in E Minor, Op. 64 (26:55) (ORTF, Antal Dorati, 6/3/72)Sound
restoration (2005): Maggi Payne. UPC# 0-17685-11712

Special! 4 CDs priced as 3. Not available in France and Germany.

"Francescatti's perfumed elegance, the lyric tone of his Hart Stradivarious,
may prove rather ripe for some tastes, but like a select few

violinists -Milstein and Kogan, especially - I find in Zino Francescatti an
arist of integrity and musical virtuosity who constantly

elevates the music he performs."

-Gary Lemco, Audiophile Audition

"[W]e need these live performances more than ever to remind us what an
aristocratic violinist Francescatti was. This is hardly a 'faute de

mieux' release, however. There's not a performance here that doesn't stand
up to scrutiny and to repeated listening, even if the performers

(and the recording engineers of the time) probably never would have guessed
that these recordings would be publicly available as many as 60

years later."

-Raymond Tuttle, Classical.net

=========================================================================
Post by Dave Cook
Does anyone know what's on this CD?
http://www.hmv.co.jp/product/detail.asp?sku=146609
I can't quite make out the cover.
Also, any recommendations for other Francescatti recordings are welcome.
I
have the Beethoven VC with Walter, the Brahms and Sibelius VCs with
Bernstein, and the Beethoven sonatas with Casadesus.
Unfortunately it looks like I missed out on the Masterworks Heritage set.
http://www.hmv.co.jp/product/detail.asp?sku=146595
HMV also has some Bach concertos on DG. Any good?
http://www.hmv.co.jp/product/detail.asp?sku=717581
Thanks,
Dave Cook
Matthew B. Tepper
2006-09-04 01:22:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Fred Maroth
Have you seen this? For more info go to http://www.musicandarts.com
Looks very interesting. By the way, this morning I listened to your set of
Brahms symphonies conducted by Koussevitzky, and enjoyed it very much (making
allowances for the noisy acetates, particularly in #2).
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
NOT an advocate of cannibalism (despite what Kevin Maroney says).
d***@aol.com
2006-09-04 06:32:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I can't think of a performer whose performances are less perfumed than
Francescatti's. He had the same sort of period attitude - the same
sort of French quasi-classicizing attitude - as his friends, Ravel and
Casadesus.

-david gable
A. Brain
2006-09-03 20:52:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dave Cook
Does anyone know what's on this CD?
http://www.hmv.co.jp/product/detail.asp?sku=146609
I can't quite make out the cover.
Also, any recommendations for other Francescatti recordings are welcome. I
have the Beethoven VC with Walter, the Brahms and Sibelius VCs with
Bernstein, and the Beethoven sonatas with Casadesus.
Unfortunately it looks like I missed out on the Masterworks Heritage set.
Not to sound like a broken record, but again, Sony keeps
reissuing and repackaging the same old stuff. The Heritage
set is still on their web site but it's definitely not available. I
ordered it from Tower a couple of years ago, and they
claimed I would be getting it as a "back order". Nope.

Back in the early '70s, I had planned to drive up to
Ames, Iowa to hear Francescatti play. Iowa State
University had some kind of music festival going on.
I think ZF was around seventy, but still playing. Alas,
something came up. And I had hoped to hear Earl
Wild in NYC last year, but a monsoon interceded.

I guess the oldest performer I've heard live is Abbey Simon,
whom I heard play brilliantly a couple of years ago when
he was over 80. Close runner-up is Leon Fleisher,
as recently as this past summer at Ravinia. He's
almost 80.
--
A. Brain


Remove NOSPAM for email.
James Kahn
2006-09-03 21:03:59 UTC
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Post by A. Brain
I guess the oldest performer I've heard live is Abbey Simon,
whom I heard play brilliantly a couple of years ago when
he was over 80. Close runner-up is Leon Fleisher,
as recently as this past summer at Ravinia. He's
almost 80.
I saw Artur Rubinstein in '76 when he was 89. I suppose anyone
who saw Earl Wild recently would beat that, as he was 90 or 91.
--
Jim
New York, NY
(Please remove "nospam." to get my e-mail address)
http://www.panix.com/~kahn
a***@aol.com
2006-09-03 21:13:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by A. Brain
Post by Dave Cook
Does anyone know what's on this CD?
http://www.hmv.co.jp/product/detail.asp?sku=146609
I can't quite make out the cover.
Also, any recommendations for other Francescatti recordings are welcome. I
have the Beethoven VC with Walter, the Brahms and Sibelius VCs with
Bernstein, and the Beethoven sonatas with Casadesus.
Unfortunately it looks like I missed out on the Masterworks Heritage set.
Not to sound like a broken record, but again, Sony keeps
reissuing and repackaging the same old stuff. The Heritage
set is still on their web site but it's definitely not available. I
ordered it from Tower a couple of years ago, and they
claimed I would be getting it as a "back order". Nope.
Back in the early '70s, I had planned to drive up to
Ames, Iowa to hear Francescatti play. Iowa State
University had some kind of music festival going on.
I think ZF was around seventy, but still playing. Alas,
something came up. And I had hoped to hear Earl
Wild in NYC last year, but a monsoon interceded.
I guess the oldest performer I've heard live is Abbey Simon,
whom I heard play brilliantly a couple of years ago when
he was over 80. Close runner-up is Leon Fleisher,
as recently as this past summer at Ravinia. He's
almost 80.
--
A. Brain
Live, Hugues Ceunod in a recital of French music aged 92 and
beautifully performed. Chosen by Stravinsky to sing in The Rake's
Progress I believe.

Still with us aged 104 but, sadly, his hearing has all but gone. I sent
him a birthday card and, more importantly, so did Dame Janet Baker who
was 73 on August 21 - another great artist.

Kind regards,
Alan M. Watkins
d***@aol.com
2006-09-03 21:56:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by A. Brain
I guess the oldest performer I've heard live is Abbey Simon,
whom I heard play brilliantly a couple of years ago when
he was over 80. Close runner-up is Leon Fleisher,
as recently as this past summer at Ravinia. He's
almost 80.
I attended a master class taught by Lotte Lehmann in the 1960's. I
must have been less than ten years old. Does that count? (I remember
her insulting a young student for performing an aria by Donizetti.) I
was also a regular listener to the Met broadcasts by the very late 60's
and heard a number of singers at the very end of their careers that
way.

I've heard both Leon Fleisher and Charles Rosen play. Mr. Rosen will
be 80 next May. Needless to say, I've also seen Boulez conduct, and
he's now 81. I sat behind Elliott Carter at one of Rosen's recitals at
the 92nd Street Y earlier this year and told him that I had just bought
a full score of his Symphony of Three Orchestras on eBay. He hadn't
heard of eBay, but he'll be 98 in December. Does that count? I'm not
sure how old Robert Mann is, but I heard him play with the Juilliard
Quartet many times including during his final season as a member.

In the early 80's, I bought tickets to hear something - it may have
been Barbiere - expressly to see Cesare Siepi, who had been an idol of
my youth, in person: he canceled the entire run. For similar reasons,
I bought tickets to Ariadne to hear Leonie Rysanek, and she canceled
the entire run. My luck changed in the mid-90's when I heard Victoria
de los Angeles. Two of the gods in my pantheon are still alive, Lisa
della Casa (b. 1919) and Cesare Siepi (b. 1923). He lives in the
Atlanta area but is a virtual recluse. I think Della Casa's
unannounced retirement took place in 1973. Back at home in
Switzerland, she's had a very difficult retirement looking after a
brain damaged child.

-david gable
Alan Briker
2006-09-03 22:50:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I saw Earl Wild at Carnegie Hall this past season at his 90th birthday
recital.
Alan


On 9/3/06 5:56 PM, in article
Post by d***@aol.com
Post by A. Brain
I guess the oldest performer I've heard live is Abbey Simon,
whom I heard play brilliantly a couple of years ago when
he was over 80. Close runner-up is Leon Fleisher,
as recently as this past summer at Ravinia. He's
almost 80.
I attended a master class taught by Lotte Lehmann in the 1960's. I
must have been less than ten years old. Does that count? (I remember
her insulting a young student for performing an aria by Donizetti.) I
was also a regular listener to the Met broadcasts by the very late 60's
and heard a number of singers at the very end of their careers that
way.
I've heard both Leon Fleisher and Charles Rosen play. Mr. Rosen will
be 80 next May. Needless to say, I've also seen Boulez conduct, and
he's now 81. I sat behind Elliott Carter at one of Rosen's recitals at
the 92nd Street Y earlier this year and told him that I had just bought
a full score of his Symphony of Three Orchestras on eBay. He hadn't
heard of eBay, but he'll be 98 in December. Does that count? I'm not
sure how old Robert Mann is, but I heard him play with the Juilliard
Quartet many times including during his final season as a member.
In the early 80's, I bought tickets to hear something - it may have
been Barbiere - expressly to see Cesare Siepi, who had been an idol of
my youth, in person: he canceled the entire run. For similar reasons,
I bought tickets to Ariadne to hear Leonie Rysanek, and she canceled
the entire run. My luck changed in the mid-90's when I heard Victoria
de los Angeles. Two of the gods in my pantheon are still alive, Lisa
della Casa (b. 1919) and Cesare Siepi (b. 1923). He lives in the
Atlanta area but is a virtual recluse. I think Della Casa's
unannounced retirement took place in 1973. Back at home in
Switzerland, she's had a very difficult retirement looking after a
brain damaged child.
-david gable
Sol L. Siegel
2006-09-03 22:53:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Me?

Horszowski, of course: 98, IIRC. Hardly note-perfect, but still
amazingly beautiful renditions of the Mozart K. 332 and Beethoven
Tempest sonatas.

That beats Rubinstein (89 and frequently showing it, just a couple of
months before his retirement), Rudolf Serkin (85, in a remarkable
Beethoven PC4) and Arrau (somewhere past 80).

- Sol L. Siegel, Philadelphia, PA
"My reputation has nothing to do with me." - Terry Gilliam
--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
Eric Grunin
2006-09-04 10:59:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by A. Brain
I guess the oldest performer I've heard live is Abbey Simon,
whom I heard play brilliantly a couple of years ago when
he was over 80. Close runner-up is Leon Fleisher,
as recently as this past summer at Ravinia. He's
almost 80.
Betty Comden and Adolph Green appeared onstage at their Carnegie Hall
Tribute concert (1999) and sang a few songs: they were 84 and 85,
respectively. They had the energy of teenagers. Hearing them sing
"Some Other Time" (from On the Town), written when they were in their
20s, is an experience I will never forget.

Runner-up: Ivry Gitlis (with Argerich) a couple years back: 82.

Regards,
Eric Grunin
www.grunin.com/eroica
makropulos
2006-09-04 11:08:14 UTC
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Eric - I'd love to have seen Comden & Green at that concert. They were
wonderful in London a few years earlier in the Tilson Thomas "On The
Town" at the Barbican: as you put it so well, the energy of teenagers!
And superb timing too.

I went to Stokowski's last two London concerts. I think he was 92 or 93
- and absolutely magical.
Post by Eric Grunin
Betty Comden and Adolph Green appeared onstage at their Carnegie Hall
Tribute concert (1999) and sang a few songs: they were 84 and 85,
respectively. They had the energy of teenagers. Hearing them sing
"Some Other Time" (from On the Town), written when they were in their
20s, is an experience I will never forget.
Runner-up: Ivry Gitlis (with Argerich) a couple years back: 82.
Regards,
Eric Grunin
www.grunin.com/eroica
w***@hotmail.com
2006-09-04 14:20:22 UTC
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Post by Eric Grunin
Runner-up: Ivry Gitlis (with Argerich) a couple years back: 82.
Regards,
Eric Grunin
www.grunin.com/eroica
Gitlis was not the oldest performer I ever heard live (although he may
have been the oldest violonist), but he definitely was the most
disastrous one I heard perform in an old age. That was last June in
Lugano, where he tried to play (there is no other word for it) the
Franck sonata, giving pianist Sergio Tiempo a hard time (who got
completely lost in the 2nd movement because of Gitlis's weird
phrasing). I think he is also the saddest exemple; it is really
incredible that nobody tells him that his playing is even beyond awful;
it's without a doubt the ugliest tone I have ever heard. He turned
Franck's sublime sonata into some sort of frivoulous French chanson. I
really think musicians should be protected against themselves if they
obviously no longer have a sense of criticism themselves. Having to
listen to someone like Gitlis nowadays is pure agony!

Apart from that, I have particularly wonderful memories of Cherkassky
who still played very well at age 85!

W.
m***@comcast.net
2006-09-04 15:38:23 UTC
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Post by w***@hotmail.com
Gitlis was not the oldest performer I ever heard live (although he may
have been the oldest violonist), but he definitely was the most
disastrous one I heard perform in an old age. That was last June in
Lugano, where he tried to play (there is no other word for it) the
Franck sonata, giving pianist Sergio Tiempo a hard time (who got
completely lost in the 2nd movement because of Gitlis's weird
phrasing). I think he is also the saddest exemple; it is really
incredible that nobody tells him that his playing is even beyond awful;
it's without a doubt the ugliest tone I have ever heard. He turned
Franck's sublime sonata into some sort of frivoulous French chanson. I
really think musicians should be protected against themselves if they
obviously no longer have a sense of criticism themselves. Having to
listen to someone like Gitlis nowadays is pure agony!
I just hope old Mr. Gitlis is not driving anymore.

Marc Perman
e***@grunin.com
2006-09-05 02:46:55 UTC
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Post by w***@hotmail.com
Gitlis was not the oldest performer I ever heard live (although he may
have been the oldest violonist), but he definitely was the most
disastrous one I heard perform in an old age. That was last June in
Lugano, where he tried to play (there is no other word for it) the
Franck sonata
Alas, he wasn't much better when I heard him. The program was the
Debussy Sonata and the Kreutzer, along with another work I have
forgotten (perhaps the Franck).

Regards,
Eric Grunin
www.grunin.com/eroica
w***@hotmail.com
2006-09-04 14:20:35 UTC
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Post by Eric Grunin
Runner-up: Ivry Gitlis (with Argerich) a couple years back: 82.
Regards,
Eric Grunin
www.grunin.com/eroica
Gitlis was not the oldest performer I ever heard live (although he may
have been the oldest violonist), but he definitely was the most
disastrous one I heard perform in an old age. That was last June in
Lugano, where he tried to play (there is no other word for it) the
Franck sonata, giving pianist Sergio Tiempo a hard time (who got
completely lost in the 2nd movement because of Gitlis's weird
phrasing). I think he is also the saddest exemple; it is really
incredible that nobody tells him that his playing is even beyond awful;
it's without a doubt the ugliest tone I have ever heard. He turned
Franck's sublime sonata into some sort of frivoulous French chanson. I
really think musicians should be protected against themselves if they
obviously no longer have a sense of criticism themselves. Having to
listen to someone like Gitlis nowadays is pure agony!

Apart from that, I have particularly wonderful memories of Cherkassky
who still played very well at age 85!

W.
Sam
2006-09-04 15:20:23 UTC
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I never heard her, but Magda Tagliaferro got a rave review from Harold
Schonberg for a performance of Schumann's Carnival, when she was past
90. Unfortunately, the review doesn't seem to be available in the
NYTimes archive.
Alan P Dawes
2006-09-05 11:35:25 UTC
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Sidonie Goosens (harp) aged 90 at the last night of the proms in 1991. She
died at the age of 105 on 15th dec 2004 and was harpist with the BBC
Symphony Orchestra from its first perfomance in Oct 1930 to her retirement
in 1980.

Alan
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David Fox
2006-09-04 16:55:00 UTC
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A. Brain wrote:

The oldest performer I ever heard live was Horszowski, live at Town
Hall in New York at the age of 99. He was fantastic. I used to see
Martin Ormandy playing with the Mostly Mozart orchestra in New York
well into his 90's.

DF
D***@aol.com
2006-09-05 21:28:34 UTC
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Post by David Fox
The oldest performer I ever heard live was Horszowski, live at Town
Hall in New York at the age of 99. He was fantastic. I used to see
Martin Ormandy playing with the Mostly Mozart orchestra in New York
well into his 90's.
DF
The oldest one I have heard is Stokowski, who was just short of his
88th birthday the last time he conducted the CSO in early 1968 (and
made the RCA recordings). Casals was also 87 when I saw and heard him
conduct the CSO and Chorus at Ravinia in his oratorio El Pessebre in
1963. Next to them is Monteux, who was 86 the last time he conducted
the CSO in 1961, again at Ravinia. Their powers didn't seem diminished
at all. The concerts were sensational.

Don Tait
Gareth Williams
2006-09-10 17:02:12 UTC
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Dunno if conductors count, but I saw Sir Reginald Goodall survive the
marathon of Parsifal when he was knocking on 86 years old. And what a
superb account he gave!
--
Regards, Gareth H Williams
Josep Vilanova
2006-09-10 17:39:00 UTC
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I saw two very old conductors. One was Gunter Wand, just before he died, and
another one was Sandor Vegh. Vegh was really funny, with long white hair
falling down the sides of his massive head. He had a back problem and could
only walk inclined forward, nearly on a 90 degrees angle, and had to conduct
sitting on a piano bench. His conducting didn't imply any type of downbeat.
He was just sitting there, with the head bent down, and every now and then
he pushed his arms forward and sort of waved them. In the first half they
did a Mozart piano concerto with a pianist who was around 16 years old (I
forgot his name). It was a good concert.

j
Post by Gareth Williams
Dunno if conductors count, but I saw Sir Reginald Goodall survive the
marathon of Parsifal when he was knocking on 86 years old. And what a
superb account he gave!
rkhalona
2006-09-05 21:45:04 UTC
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Post by Dave Cook
Unfortunately it looks like I missed out on the Masterworks Heritage set.
http://www.hmv.co.jp/product/detail.asp?sku=146595
I wore out this LP when I was a kid. I believe the Paganini is still
in print on Sony Essential Classics.
Post by Dave Cook
HMV also has some Bach concertos on DG. Any good?
http://www.hmv.co.jp/product/detail.asp?sku=717581
These are pretty romantic and stylish readings in excellent sound. I
have it on a French DG budget Digipack, which may be available from
some of the French vendors.

RK
Matthew B. Tepper
2006-09-06 02:49:30 UTC
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Post by rkhalona
Post by Dave Cook
Unfortunately it looks like I missed out on the Masterworks Heritage set.
http://www.hmv.co.jp/product/detail.asp?sku=146595
I wore out this LP when I was a kid. I believe the Paganini is still
in print on Sony Essential Classics.
Indeed, although oddly enough I bought this CD primarily for the Bottesini
Grand Duo Concertante with Ricci and Petracchi. Fine Paganini, though!
Post by rkhalona
Post by Dave Cook
HMV also has some Bach concertos on DG. Any good?
http://www.hmv.co.jp/product/detail.asp?sku=717581
These are pretty romantic and stylish readings in excellent sound. I
have it on a French DG budget Digipack, which may be available from
some of the French vendors.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
NOT an advocate of cannibalism (despite what Kevin Maroney says).
g***@gmail.com
2018-12-02 15:54:59 UTC
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Post by Dave Cook
Does anyone know what's on this CD?
http://www.hmv.co.jp/product/detail.asp?sku=146609
I can't quite make out the cover.
Also, any recommendations for other Francescatti recordings are welcome. I
have the Beethoven VC with Walter, the Brahms and Sibelius VCs with
Bernstein, and the Beethoven sonatas with Casadesus.
Unfortunately it looks like I missed out on the Masterworks Heritage set.
http://www.hmv.co.jp/product/detail.asp?sku=146595
HMV also has some Bach concertos on DG. Any good?
http://www.hmv.co.jp/product/detail.asp?sku=717581
Thanks,
Dave Cook
(Recent Youtube upload):

Zino Francescatti plays "Tzigane" - LIVE, 1966

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