Discussion:
Pianists from the last twenty years
(too old to reply)
Slrdsyj
2004-07-04 23:03:54 UTC
Permalink
For those of you who are classical recording buffs and connoisseurs, I'd
like to know your opinions of these pianists, pianists who have been noted for
their performances and their recordings over the last twenty years:

- Andre Watts
- Mischa Dichter
- Jean-Yves Thibaudet
- Carter Larsen
- Angela Hewitt
- Joanna MacGregor
- Wayne Marshall
- Alan Kogosowski (sp?)
Henk van Tuijl
2004-07-05 09:01:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Slrdsyj
For those of you who are classical recording buffs and connoisseurs, I'd
like to know your opinions of these pianists, pianists who have been noted for
...
- Mischa Dichter
Last twenty years? It must have been forty
...
Post by Slrdsyj
- Jean-Yves Thibaudet
A very popular French pianist, famous for
his socks - and talent. I don't like his
jazz, his Gershwin nor his Satie but have
no problems with his Ravel and Debussy.
Post by Slrdsyj
...
- Angela Hewitt
She is a great Canadian pianist. Her Ravel
is outstanding.
Post by Slrdsyj
...
Henk
Allan Burns
2004-07-05 15:56:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Henk van Tuijl
Post by Slrdsyj
- Jean-Yves Thibaudet
A very popular French pianist, famous for
his socks - and talent. I don't like his
jazz
His Evans and Ellington discs aren't jazz, of course.

If you want some good jazz pianists from the last twenty years, try
Benny Green, Marcus Roberts, Bill Charlap, and Brad Mehldau.


Allan Burns
Allan Burns
2004-07-05 15:54:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Slrdsyj
For those of you who are classical recording buffs and connoisseurs, I'd
like to know your opinions of these pianists, pianists who have been noted for
- Andre Watts
- Mischa Dichter
- Jean-Yves Thibaudet
- Carter Larsen
- Angela Hewitt
- Joanna MacGregor
- Wayne Marshall
- Alan Kogosowski (sp?)
I don't keep up with the careers of every pianist out there, but for
my money, the ten most interesting classical pianists who have built
careers over the last twenty years have probably been:


Leif Ove Andsnes
Nikolai Demidenko
Helene Grimaud
Marc-Andre Hamelin
Stephen Hough
Mikhail Pletnev
Sergey Schepkin
Grigory Sokolov
Arcadi Volodos
Krystian Zimerman


I give high marks to pianists who strike out convincingly in new
directions, putting together interesting programs and seeking out new
repertoire, and also, obviously, to pianists who can deliver
performances of core repertoire competitive with the very best
recordings of the past. Unfortunately, the only contemporary pianist
seemingly capable of delivering such competitive performances
consistently is Sokolov, and he hasn't issued a new recording since
1997.


Allan Burns
Van Eyes
2004-07-05 16:15:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Allan Burns
I don't keep up with the careers of every pianist out there, but for
my money, the ten most interesting classical pianists who have built
Andsnes, Demidenko, Grimaud, Hamelin, Hough, Pletnev, Schepkin, Sokolov, Volodos, Zimerman.
I give high marks to pianists who strike out convincingly in new
directions....
Good list, although I don't have much listening experience with Schepkin
and Volodos.
Some others I'd mention for their contributions to
portions of the past 20 years, include, Pogorelich, Aimard, Berezovsky,
Boffard, Scherbakov.


Regards
--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG
Andy Evans
2004-07-05 18:38:52 UTC
Permalink
Pogorelic of course - what about Ovchinnikov - what happened to him?

=== Andy Evans ===
Visit our Website:- http://www.artsandmedia.com
Audio, music and health pages and interesting links.
Allan Burns
2004-07-06 01:11:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Van Eyes
Good list, although I don't have much listening experience with Schepkin
Perhaps the most accomplished contemporary Bach player. Check out his
Goldberg Variations and then his Partitas and WTC.
Post by Van Eyes
and Volodos.
Technically beyond belief, but also a very lyrical player. I
particularly recommend his Schubert and Rachmaninoff discs.
Post by Van Eyes
Some others I'd mention for their contributions to
portions of the past 20 years, include, Pogorelich, Aimard, Berezovsky,
Boffard, Scherbakov.
I'm allergic to Pogorelich, but I should probably get to know the next
four better. Any specific recs?

Allan
Matthew B. Tepper
2004-07-06 04:10:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Allan Burns
Post by Van Eyes
and Volodos.
Technically beyond belief, but also a very lyrical player. I
particularly recommend his Schubert and Rachmaninoff discs.
I underestimated Volodos as a musician (acknowledging that his technique is
fabulous) before I heard his Schubert.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Take THAT, Daniel Lin, Mark Sadek, James Lin & Christopher Chung!
Tom Deacon
2004-07-06 12:06:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Allan Burns
Post by Van Eyes
and Volodos.
Technically beyond belief, but also a very lyrical player. I
particularly recommend his Schubert and Rachmaninoff discs.
I underestimated Volodos as a musician (acknowledging that his technique is
fabulous) before I heard his Schubert.
And now his ears have failed Tepper. Poor boy!

Schubert, for your information, never drove a Mack truck.

TD
M.Bartnik
2004-07-06 16:29:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tom Deacon
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
Post by Allan Burns
Post by Van Eyes
and Volodos.
Technically beyond belief, but also a very lyrical player. I
particularly recommend his Schubert and Rachmaninoff discs.
I underestimated Volodos as a musician (acknowledging that his technique is
fabulous) before I heard his Schubert.
And now his ears have failed Tepper. Poor boy!
Schubert, for your information, never drove a Mack truck.
TD
Well, I only waited for that comment. I imagine you couldn't resist...;-)

Just for the record: I don't share your negative view on Volodos. But much
has been said on this, and I don't want to begin another discussion on that.

M.B.
DSCH symphony 6
2004-07-06 04:36:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Allan Burns
Post by Van Eyes
Some others I'd mention for their contributions to
portions of the past 20 years, include, Pogorelich, Aimard, Berezovsky,
Boffard, Scherbakov.
I'm allergic to Pogorelich, but I should probably get to know the next
four better. Any specific recs?
Allan
Scherbakov has good set of Shostakovich's Preludes and Fugues on Naxos

Fred
Tom Deacon
2004-07-06 12:07:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by DSCH symphony 6
Post by Allan Burns
Post by Van Eyes
Some others I'd mention for their contributions to
portions of the past 20 years, include, Pogorelich, Aimard, Berezovsky,
Boffard, Scherbakov.
I'm allergic to Pogorelich, but I should probably get to know the next
four better. Any specific recs?
Allan
Scherbakov has good set of Shostakovich's Preludes and Fugues on Naxos
You might also check out his recent SACD/CD combi discs of Rachmaninoff 2 &
3, and Tchaikovsky 1 & 3.

TD
M.Bartnik
2004-07-06 16:33:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tom Deacon
Post by DSCH symphony 6
Scherbakov has good set of Shostakovich's Preludes and Fugues on Naxos
You might also check out his recent SACD/CD combi discs of Rachmaninoff 2 &
3, and Tchaikovsky 1 & 3.
TD
Hmm, they're not that good, actually - but if you like your Rachmaninov
rather slow, with emphasis on the lyrical side - why not? After repeated
listening, I found this approach quite interesting, in fact. And he is a
brilliant pianist, no note he plays is there by chance, everything's
beautifully articulated.

But as I wrote in a previous message, the sound quality of the
multichannel-version is just awful. The stereo mix is much better, though -
I recommend to just buy the simple CD version which is cheaper than the SACD
hybrid.

M.B.
Tom Deacon
2004-07-06 18:58:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by M.Bartnik
Post by Tom Deacon
Post by DSCH symphony 6
Scherbakov has good set of Shostakovich's Preludes and Fugues on Naxos
You might also check out his recent SACD/CD combi discs of Rachmaninoff 2
&
Post by Tom Deacon
3, and Tchaikovsky 1 & 3.
TD
Hmm, they're not that good, actually - but if you like your Rachmaninov
rather slow, with emphasis on the lyrical side - why not? After repeated
listening, I found this approach quite interesting, in fact. And he is a
brilliant pianist, no note he plays is there by chance, everything's
beautifully articulated.
I have listened to these concertos about 5 times - they are in the car, you
see, and I am lazy about changing the CDs in the changer - so I know them
very well indeed.

There are times when he causes me to rethink certain passages. E.g. The
final chords of Rach 2, II, where the chords are not drowned out by the LH
passages. With Scherbakov they make me think that yet again Rachmaninoff has
the bells of Moscow tolling. The effect is amplified by the very regularity,
almost mechanical quality, of the chords themselves. Interesting.

There are other times when I would wish for more stretching at climaxes,
e.g. Rach 2, III finale.

But all in all a performance one could easily take dictation from. Not that
this is all there is, but certainly Scherbakov reveals all there is in the
score itself.
Post by M.Bartnik
But as I wrote in a previous message, the sound quality of the
multichannel-version is just awful. The stereo mix is much better, though -
I recommend to just buy the simple CD version which is cheaper than the SACD
hybrid.
I bought the SACD hybrid, as one can always listen to the stereo version.
But I don't have an SACD player as yet, so I cannot confirm Marcel's
opinion. Perhaps the vagueness of the piano image is SACD-player dependent.
One would hope not, of course. In any event, the hybrid version is not that
expensive here in Canada. So, I went with the "future" in my choice.

TD
M.Bartnik
2004-07-06 16:30:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by DSCH symphony 6
Scherbakov has good set of Shostakovich's Preludes and Fugues on Naxos
Fred
Yes, they're quite good indeed. His latest Shostakovich CD with the 1st
piano sonata isn't bad either.

M.B.
John Turner
2004-07-07 16:53:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by M.Bartnik
Post by DSCH symphony 6
Scherbakov has good set of Shostakovich's Preludes and Fugues on Naxos
Fred
Indeed -- I was quite pleasantly surprised by the P&F on Naxos -- it's
now one of my top three favorites (and there aren't too many, so you
can make a pretty guess about the other two).
Post by M.Bartnik
Yes, they're quite good indeed. His latest Shostakovich CD with the 1st
piano sonata isn't bad either.
M.B.
Thanks, Marcel. I will absolutely take your word and get it -- was
rather planning to, in any event.

John Turner, Philadelphia
Ian Pace
2004-07-06 11:34:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Allan Burns
Post by Van Eyes
Good list, although I don't have much listening experience with Schepkin
Perhaps the most accomplished contemporary Bach player. Check out his
Goldberg Variations and then his Partitas and WTC.
Post by Van Eyes
and Volodos.
Technically beyond belief, but also a very lyrical player. I
particularly recommend his Schubert and Rachmaninoff discs.
Post by Van Eyes
Some others I'd mention for their contributions to
portions of the past 20 years, include, Pogorelich, Aimard, Berezovsky,
Boffard, Scherbakov.
I'm allergic to Pogorelich, but I should probably get to know the next
four better. Any specific recs?
Get Aimard's Beethoven Concertos with Harnoncourt and COE, Ives Concord
Sonata together with various songs with Susan Graham, and Ligeti Etudes, for
starters. Boffard has a fabulous disc with the Debussy and Bartok Etudes.
And if you're interested, you can hear them both playing Boulez Structures
Book 2 on DG.

Best,
Ian
M.Bartnik
2004-07-06 16:34:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ian Pace
Get Aimard's Beethoven Concertos with Harnoncourt and COE, Ives Concord
Sonata together with various songs with Susan Graham, and Ligeti Etudes, for
starters. Boffard has a fabulous disc with the Debussy and Bartok Etudes.
And if you're interested, you can hear them both playing Boulez Structures
Book 2 on DG.
Best,
Ian
Aimard's Ives Concord sonata is not as good as Hamelin's, in my opinion. His
Liget Etudes are fabulous, though. And his Beethoven concertos intriguing,
especially for the interaction with the orchestra under Harnoncourt.

M.B.
Allen
2004-07-06 17:55:21 UTC
Permalink
M.Bartnik wrote:

<snip>
Post by M.Bartnik
Aimard's Ives Concord sonata is not as good as Hamelin's, in my opinion. His
Liget Etudes are fabulous, though. And his Beethoven concertos intriguing,
especially for the interaction with the orchestra under Harnoncourt.
M.B.
I regret to say that agree with you about the Ives. Technically, it's
superb, but he just doesn't "get it". I'll take Kirkpatrick (alas, not
ever on CD), Kalish and Hamekin over Aimard in the Ives, by a very large
margin. Susan Graham does quite well with the songs, thoug.
Allen
Ian Pace
2004-07-06 19:55:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Allen
<snip>
Post by M.Bartnik
Aimard's Ives Concord sonata is not as good as Hamelin's, in my opinion. His
Liget Etudes are fabulous, though. And his Beethoven concertos intriguing,
especially for the interaction with the orchestra under Harnoncourt.
M.B.
I regret to say that agree with you about the Ives. Technically, it's
superb, but he just doesn't "get it". I'll take Kirkpatrick (alas, not
ever on CD), Kalish and Hamekin over Aimard in the Ives, by a very large
margin. Susan Graham does quite well with the songs, though.
Really couldn't have a more opposite opinion! I find Susan Graham very
irritating in the songs, which she turns into light-hearted run a la Dawn
Upshaw, no sense that these are deeper and more serious compositions
(compared, say, to Jan DeGaetani whose old Nonesuch recording with Kalish is
marvellous). Aimard's piano playing is the redeeming feature in the songs.

Best,
Ian
Matthew B. Tepper
2004-07-06 20:03:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Allen
<snip>
Post by M.Bartnik
Aimard's Ives Concord sonata is not as good as Hamelin's, in my opinion.
His Liget Etudes are fabulous, though. And his Beethoven concertos
intriguing, especially for the interaction with the orchestra under
Harnoncourt.
M.B.
I regret to say that agree with you about the Ives. Technically, it's
superb, but he just doesn't "get it". I'll take Kirkpatrick (alas, not
ever on CD), Kalish and Hamekin over Aimard in the Ives, by a very large
margin. Susan Graham does quite well with the songs, thoug.
Allen
I have to admit I bought the CD as much for her as for Aimard.
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Take THAT, Daniel Lin, Mark Sadek, James Lin & Christopher Chung!
Allen
2004-07-06 20:39:14 UTC
Permalink
Matthew B. Tepper wrote:
<SNIP>
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
I have to admit I bought the CD as much for her as for Aimard.
And what is your opinion?
Allen
Matthew B. Tepper
2004-07-07 03:47:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Allen
<SNIP>
Post by Matthew B. Tepper
I have to admit I bought the CD as much for her as for Aimard.
And what is your opinion?
She's pretty good, but I prefer the selections by Boatwright, De Gaetani,
Ohrenstein and company, and even Fischer-Dieskau. Aimard's Sonata is very
interesting, but will not replace either Kirkpatrick (insert usual grumble
against you-know-who here).
--
Matthew B. Tepper: WWW, science fiction, classical music, ducks!
My personal home page -- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/index.html
My main music page --- http://home.earthlink.net/~oy/berlioz.html
To write to me, do for my address what Androcles did for the lion
Take THAT, Daniel Lin, Mark Sadek, James Lin & Christopher Chung!
Tom Deacon
2004-07-06 12:04:37 UTC
Permalink
On 7/5/04 9:11 PM, in article
Post by Allan Burns
Post by Van Eyes
Good list, although I don't have much listening experience with Schepkin
Perhaps the most accomplished contemporary Bach player. Check out his
Goldberg Variations and then his Partitas and WTC.
Decorative, indeed. Too much so.
Post by Allan Burns
Post by Van Eyes
and Volodos.
Technically beyond belief, but also a very lyrical player. I
particularly recommend his Schubert and Rachmaninoff discs.
Boring. Musically null.
Post by Allan Burns
Post by Van Eyes
Some others I'd mention for their contributions to
portions of the past 20 years, include, Pogorelich, Aimard, Berezovsky,
Boffard, Scherbakov.
I'm allergic to Pogorelich, but I should probably get to know the next
four better. Any specific recs?
Aimard is the "pianist du jour". He has been around for decades and only
today's weird musical climate seems to be allowing him to advance.

Berezovsky has done some astonishing things, among them some of the best
Beethoven concerto recordings in recent years. He and Dausgaard put
Aimard/Harmoncourt to shame.

Boffard: who dat?

Scherbakov: a consummate pianist, who is still developing, in my opinion. A
work in progress, so stay tuned.

Pogorelich: finito la commedia. A shooting star.

TD
Henk van Tuijl
2004-07-06 12:54:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tom Deacon
On 7/5/04 9:11 PM, in article
Post by Allan Burns
I'm allergic to Pogorelich, but I should probably get to know the next
four better. Any specific recs?
Aimard is the "pianist du jour". He has been around for decades and only
today's weird musical climate seems to be allowing him to advance.
His Ligeti is probably the best around.
His Debussy Etudes are disappointing.
Post by Tom Deacon
Berezovsky has done some astonishing things, among them some of the best
Beethoven concerto recordings in recent years. He and Dausgaard put
Aimard/Harmoncourt to shame.
Berezovsky is to be avoided in Chopin.
However, his Schumann is great - and
so is his Ravel.
Post by Tom Deacon
Boffard: who dat?
Young French talent who recorded the
Debussy Etudes.I even prefer Aimard's
interpretation.
Post by Tom Deacon
Scherbakov: a consummate pianist, who is still developing, in my opinion. A
work in progress, so stay tuned.
I regularly revisit his Godowsky/Bach.
I do not know what keeps him from
having a great career? His teaching?
Post by Tom Deacon
Pogorelich: finito la commedia. A shooting star.
I am afraid so. He has become my
favourite Has Been a Great Pianist.

BTW, Ian Pace was right about Planes'
Debussy Preludes. They are far better
than I expected.

Henk
Peter Lemken
2004-07-06 14:00:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Henk van Tuijl
Post by Tom Deacon
Scherbakov: a consummate pianist, who is still developing, in my opinion. A
work in progress, so stay tuned.
I regularly revisit his Godowsky/Bach.
I do not know what keeps him from
having a great career? His teaching?
His wife.

Peter Lemken
Berlin
--
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in
a pretty and well-preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly
used up, totally worn out and loudly proclaiming, 'Wow, what a ride!'
Tom Deacon
2004-07-06 14:16:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Lemken
Post by Henk van Tuijl
I regularly revisit his Godowsky/Bach.
I do not know what keeps him from
having a great career? His teaching?
His wife.
What man would let his wife ruin his career?

What woman would want to?

TD
M.Bartnik
2004-07-06 16:39:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Henk van Tuijl
Post by Tom Deacon
Aimard is the "pianist du jour". He has been around for decades and only
today's weird musical climate seems to be allowing him to advance.
His Ligeti is probably the best around.
Indeed. I heard him play all of them live one evening - an awe-inspiring
experience.
Post by Henk van Tuijl
His Debussy Etudes are disappointing.
I found them quite good. Better than Uchida's, in fact.
Post by Henk van Tuijl
Berezovsky is to be avoided in Chopin.
I agree. Technically impeccable, but no musical instincts for that music.
Everything sounds like a patchwork.
Post by Henk van Tuijl
However, his Schumann is great
If you refer to his Teldec-disc, it's a disaster. I never heard the 2nd
sonata or the Davidsbündlertänze played so uninspired and boringly.
Post by Henk van Tuijl
- and
so is his Ravel.
Indeed - he should play more french music, it seems to suit him. His
Goldberg variations were rather interesting, too, as well as his Diabelli
variations.
Post by Henk van Tuijl
Henk
M.B.
M.Bartnik
2004-07-06 16:37:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tom Deacon
Aimard is the "pianist du jour". He has been around for decades and only
today's weird musical climate seems to be allowing him to advance.
I think that's largely due to the fact that in the last few years he has
played something else than music of the late 20th century. There are very
few classical listeners who like Ligeti, Messiaen etc. - and I think he also
has something to say in other repertoire.
Post by Tom Deacon
Berezovsky has done some astonishing things, among them some of the best
Beethoven concerto recordings in recent years. He and Dausgaard put
Aimard/Harmoncourt to shame.
Scherbakov: a consummate pianist, who is still developing, in my opinion. A
work in progress, so stay tuned.
Indeed. I wish he would concertize a bit more - although he has a steady
output of CDs.
Post by Tom Deacon
Pogorelich: finito la commedia. A shooting star.
Yes. A loss, in my opinion - many of his CDs were really good. What I heard
from him in concert sometimes put me to sleep, but there were excellent
moments nevertheless.
Post by Tom Deacon
TD
M.B.
Allan Burns
2004-07-06 21:11:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tom Deacon
Decorative, indeed. Too much so.
[. . .]
Post by Tom Deacon
Boring. Musically null.
Truly, I'm waiting with bated breath for further samples of such
persuasive critical eloquence. It's always amusing, after all,
listening to addlepates insult their betters.

Allan
Tom Deacon
2004-07-07 01:44:53 UTC
Permalink
On 7/6/04 5:11 PM, in article
Post by Allan Burns
Post by Tom Deacon
Decorative, indeed. Too much so.
[. . .]
Post by Tom Deacon
Boring. Musically null.
Truly, I'm waiting with bated breath for further samples of such
persuasive critical eloquence. It's always amusing, after all,
listening to addlepates insult their betters.
Fortunately we get to choose our "betters", and surprise, surprise, I guess
your not one of mine.

TD
M.Bartnik
2004-07-06 16:28:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Allan Burns
Post by Van Eyes
Some others I'd mention for their contributions to
portions of the past 20 years, include, Pogorelich, Aimard, Berezovsky,
Boffard, Scherbakov.
I'm allergic to Pogorelich, but I should probably get to know the next
four better. Any specific recs?
Aimard: his Debussy Etudes, any Ligeti and Messiaen (if you like the
composers). His live from Carnegie isn't bad either.

Berezovsky: Russian Music CD (Night on the bare mountain, Islamey, some
Medtner), the Ravel disc, Rachmaninov 1st sonata+Chopin variations. I didn't
like the Schumann CD at all. Everything published by now-defunct Teldec.

Scherbakov: Lyapunov Etudes; the first 5 of his ongoing Godowsky-series. I
don't recommend his Beethoven/Liszt-symphonies (see previous post), nor his
latest Rachmaninov solo pieces-CD. The concertos that have recently been
issued on SACD/DVD-Audio are not bad, either, but the Rachmaninov 2+3 are a
little too slow and lyrical for my taste, and there are many better
interpretations of the two Tchaikovsky concertos. What's more: the
multi-channel sound is the worst I ever heard - you almost cannot hear the
piano, almost no dynamical differences, just a mush of sound. The stereo
version is much better, though.
Post by Allan Burns
Allan
M.B.
Van Eyes
2004-07-06 20:05:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Allan Burns
I should probably get to know the next
four better. Any specific recs?
Berezovsky - Chopin Etudes Op. 10 & 25 (Apex); Liszt 12 Etudes (Elatus)

Boffard - Debussy Etudes Bks. 1 & 2 (h. mundi); Faure Vln. & Pno Sonatas
w. Faust (h. mundi); Boulez Sur Incises (DG); Boulez "Structures" w.
Aimard (DG); Berio Sequenza IV (DG); Schoenberg Pierrot Lunaire w.
Boulez (DG)

Aimard - Ligeti (Sony & Teldec series); Ligeti Pno Cto w. Boulez (DG);
Boulez Sonatine, Pno. Sonata 1 (Apex); Messiaen "Vingt Regards"
(Teldec); Berio "Points" w. Boulez (Sony); Boulez "Notations",
"Structures" w. Boffard (DG); Boulez Messagesquisse (DG)

Scherbakov - Shostakovich 24 Preludes Op. 34 (Naxos), 24 Preludes &
Fugues Op. 87 (Naxos), Rachmaninov Pno Sonata 2, etc. (Naxos)


Regards
--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG
Ian Pace
2004-07-06 20:15:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Van Eyes
Post by Allan Burns
I should probably get to know the next
four better. Any specific recs?
Boffard - Debussy Etudes Bks. 1 & 2 (h. mundi); Faure Vln. & Pno Sonatas
w. Faust (h. mundi);
Totally forgot about the Faure disc - recommendation strongly seconded.
Totally heartfelt and deeply moving playing on both performers' parts, a
real favourite disc of mine.

Best,
Ian
Allan Burns
2004-07-07 04:51:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Van Eyes
Berezovsky - Chopin Etudes Op. 10 & 25 (Apex); Liszt 12 Etudes (Elatus)
Boffard - Debussy Etudes Bks. 1 & 2 (h. mundi); Faure Vln. & Pno Sonatas
w. Faust (h. mundi); Boulez Sur Incises (DG); Boulez "Structures" w.
Aimard (DG); Berio Sequenza IV (DG); Schoenberg Pierrot Lunaire w.
Boulez (DG)
Aimard - Ligeti (Sony & Teldec series); Ligeti Pno Cto w. Boulez (DG);
Boulez Sonatine, Pno. Sonata 1 (Apex); Messiaen "Vingt Regards"
(Teldec); Berio "Points" w. Boulez (Sony); Boulez "Notations",
"Structures" w. Boffard (DG); Boulez Messagesquisse (DG)
Scherbakov - Shostakovich 24 Preludes Op. 34 (Naxos), 24 Preludes &
Fugues Op. 87 (Naxos), Rachmaninov Pno Sonata 2, etc. (Naxos)
Thanks very much for the recs. Not all that repertoire is "my cup of
tea," but some definitely is. I have Scherbakov playing Medtner,
which didn't quite do it for me after Demidenko, but I could probably
use a fresh set of the Shostakovich Preludes, so I'll definitely keep
this one in mind.

Allan
M.Bartnik
2004-07-06 16:22:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Van Eyes
Some others I'd mention for their contributions to
portions of the past 20 years, include, Pogorelich, Aimard, Berezovsky,
Boffard, Scherbakov.
Pogorelich does not really exist any more, I think.

Aimard is of course the hall-mark for 20th century music (Ligety, Messiaen,
Boulez...); his latest Debussy CD was excellent, too, and he's also a
Beethoven player of some standing, even though I wouldn't put him up with
the best.

Berezovsky evokes mixed emotions in me - there are things he does which are
simply marvelous, such as when he plays Medtner, Prokofiev or Scriabin; his
Beethoven concertos on a rather obscure label were quite good, too. But his
Schumann (the Teldec CD) is one of the worst I ever heard, so uninspired and
tepid. And what I heard from his Chopin in live concerts was not really
good - except the piano concertos. I like his Ravel CD very much, though;
and the CD with russian music (Balakirev Islamey, Night on a bare mountain
etc.) is simply outstanding.

Scherbakov...I attended several of his concerts and he struck me as someone
for whom nothing is beyond his technical skills - what he did with the
Lyapunov Etudes was fantastic, just as his Tchaikovsky/Pletnev Nutcracker
suite. The Bach/Godowsky-CD is very good, too. But I have to admit I'm no
big fan of his ongoing Beethoven/Liszt series (too harsh, everything is said
with a sledgehammer), nor of the last Godowsky instalment (with the
Passacaglia) that was much too mannered for my taste. Same goes for his
latest Rachmaninov CD (with the 2nd sonata) - he always seems to want to
restrain himself when it would be much better just to let go, giving the
impression of someone perpetually holding his breath. Quite annoying.
Post by Van Eyes
Regards
M.B.
Wayne Reimer
2004-07-06 21:38:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by M.Bartnik
Post by Van Eyes
Some others I'd mention for their contributions to
portions of the past 20 years, include, Pogorelich, Aimard, Berezovsky,
Boffard, Scherbakov.
Pogorelich does not really exist any more, I think.
Jeez, that's too bad. I'm scheduled to go hear his ghost, I guess, in recital
in a few months.

wr
Simon Roberts
2004-07-06 22:24:54 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@news.sf.sbcglobal.net>, Wayne Reimer
says...
Post by Wayne Reimer
Post by M.Bartnik
Post by Van Eyes
Some others I'd mention for their contributions to
portions of the past 20 years, include, Pogorelich, Aimard, Berezovsky,
Boffard, Scherbakov.
Pogorelich does not really exist any more, I think.
Jeez, that's too bad. I'm scheduled to go hear his ghost, I guess, in recital
in a few months.
What's he scheduled to play (assuming it's been announced yet)?

Simon
Wayne Reimer
2004-07-08 03:22:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Wayne Reimer
says...
<...>
Post by Wayne Reimer
Post by Wayne Reimer
Post by M.Bartnik
Pogorelich does not really exist any more, I think.
Jeez, that's too bad. I'm scheduled to go hear his ghost, I guess, in recital
in a few months.
What's he scheduled to play (assuming it's been announced yet)?
Simon
It's Oct. 24, in San Francisco -

BEETHOVEN Sonata in D minor, Op.31, No.2 "Der Sturm"
(known to some of us rubes as "the Tempest" sonata - I've heard him do this one
before and thought it was very good, although his extreme interpretation of the
meaning of "Largo" in the first movement caused noticable gritting of teeth
amongst those in the audience who had certain expectations about how the music
should go)
BEETHOVEN Sonata in E minor, Op.90
BEETHOVEN Rondo a cappriccio in G Major, Op.129
SIBELIUS Valse Triste, Op.44, No.2
RACHMANINOFF Moments musicaux, Op.16

wr
Dan Koren
2004-07-05 19:00:55 UTC
Permalink
... the only contemporary pianist seemingly capable of
delivering such competitive performances consistently
is Sokolov, and he hasn't issued a new recording since
1997.
Sokolov is wonderful, but no more so
than Pletnev.



dk
Allan Burns
2004-07-06 00:59:17 UTC
Permalink
Sokolov is wonderful, but no more so than Pletnev.
I was interested to see that on another thread you called Pletnev "the
greatest living pianist." Hey, Oscar Peterson's still alive. But if
we want to focus only on contemporary recordings and the classical
genre, then I suppose MP is about as good a pick as any. His
orchestral command of the instrument is truly phenomenal--but it's
just that there's something about his "objective" approach that leaves
me a little cold. It's a bit like my reaction to Michelangeli. Both
possess godly abilities on the absolute highest rung of technical
achievement, but in their pursuit of perfection both also seem to
stand outside the music rather than abandon themselves to it, and the
result, although usually very, very impressive indeed, sometimes comes
across as emotionally netural or even somewhat distorted. I often
walk away astounded but never quite as deeply moved as I am by the
best performances of, say, Fischer, Feinberg, Sofronitsky, Richter,
Evans, and, yes, Sokolov.

In the few pieces both Pletnev and Sokolov have recorded--e.g., Chopin
Second Sonata, Prokofiev Eighth Sonata--I have a decided preference
for Sokolov. (And can you really even imagine Pletnev recording a
D.894 in league with Sokolov's? I pick that piece because it's a
supreme test of utterly exposed expression and musicality. I can't
imagine--but I'd be more than happy to be proven wrong . . .)

I'm just drawing a few largely subjective distinctions to explain why,
at the top of the heap, this listener has a preference for Sokolov.
It's really just too bad, though, that S hasn't yet recorded enough to
give us a complete view of his artistry.

Allan
graham
2004-07-06 01:15:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Allan Burns
Sokolov is wonderful, but no more so than Pletnev.
I was interested to see that on another thread you called Pletnev "the
greatest living pianist." Hey, Oscar Peterson's still alive. But if
we want to focus only on contemporary recordings and the classical
genre, then I suppose MP is about as good a pick as any. His
orchestral command of the instrument is truly phenomenal--but it's
just that there's something about his "objective" approach that leaves
me a little cold. It's a bit like my reaction to Michelangeli. Both
possess godly abilities on the absolute highest rung of technical
achievement, but in their pursuit of perfection both also seem to
stand outside the music rather than abandon themselves to it, and the
result, although usually very, very impressive indeed, sometimes comes
across as emotionally netural or even somewhat distorted. I often
walk away astounded but never quite as deeply moved as I am by the
best performances of, say, Fischer, Feinberg, Sofronitsky, Richter,
Evans, and, yes, Sokolov.
In the few pieces both Pletnev and Sokolov have recorded--e.g., Chopin
Second Sonata, Prokofiev Eighth Sonata--I have a decided preference
for Sokolov. (And can you really even imagine Pletnev recording a
D.894 in league with Sokolov's? I pick that piece because it's a
supreme test of utterly exposed expression and musicality. I can't
imagine--but I'd be more than happy to be proven wrong . . .)
I'm just drawing a few largely subjective distinctions to explain why,
at the top of the heap, this listener has a preference for Sokolov.
It's really just too bad, though, that S hasn't yet recorded enough to
give us a complete view of his artistry.
I heard Sokolove play some Couperin at Snape Maltings 2 or 3 years ago.
Magic!
Graham
M.Bartnik
2004-07-06 16:41:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by graham
I heard Sokolove play some Couperin at Snape Maltings 2 or 3 years ago.
Magic!
His Rameau is one of the most beautiful I ever heard, I wish he would play
more of him. And the Couperin tic-toc-choc is one of his regular encores.
Recently, he has played much Bach and Beethoven, both with outstanding
technical mastership and impressive musical ideas. One of the best recitals
I attended in the last few years were Sokolov's.
Post by graham
Graham
M.B.
Tom Deacon
2004-07-06 11:59:21 UTC
Permalink
On 7/5/04 8:59 PM, in article
Post by Allan Burns
I'm just drawing a few largely subjective distinctions to explain why,
at the top of the heap, this listener has a preference for Sokolov.
It's really just too bad, though, that S hasn't yet recorded enough to
give us a complete view of his artistry.
Do you, in fact, think that you have enough evidence and personal experience
of the artist even to state that he is "at the top of the heap"?

TD
Allan Burns
2004-07-06 21:22:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tom Deacon
Do you, in fact, think
Why do you think I want to talk with you? I don't. Scram.

Allan
Tom Deacon
2004-07-07 01:45:56 UTC
Permalink
On 7/6/04 5:22 PM, in article
Post by Allan Burns
Post by Tom Deacon
Do you, in fact, think
Why do you think I want to talk with you? I don't. Scram.
We weren't talking to you, Alan.

You just overheard.

It is very rude to listen in to the conversations of others.

Mind your manners, please.

TD
Ssg217
2004-07-07 02:39:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Allan Burns
Post by Tom Deacon
Do you, in fact, think
Why do you think I want to talk with you?
That won't stop him. LOL, Allan, if it were that simple. He provides some free
entertainment, though, as he is as senile as to be unable to follow who said
what so he's similar to a clown preparing to throw mud with both hands,
forgetting he was, and scratching his big nose. Right now he just wrote about a
John Turner's having ignored my "little inconsequential post", when in fact the
"little inconsequential post" was his, Deacon's, not mine. But who's counting?

(N. B.: By the way, when I use the word "senile", no insult to the elderly in
general is implied, as I think it degrading to make fun of somebody *only*
because (s)he aged. I am quite positive though that Deacon's memory was every
bit as acute and his mental processes were every bit as vivacious fifty years
ago as they are now. In fact probably they are better now. They must be. After
all, any evolution must have been an improvement.)

BTW, good to see you back, Allan. Or are you Anthony? Or Andy? Nevermind.

regards,
SG (I think)
Tom Deacon
2004-07-07 12:02:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ssg217
Post by Allan Burns
Post by Tom Deacon
Do you, in fact, think
Why do you think I want to talk with you?
That won't stop him.
Certainly not. And why should it? It certainly doesn't stop Golescu.

LOL, Allan, if it were that simple. He provides some free
Post by Ssg217
entertainment, though, as he is as senile as to be unable to follow who said
what so he's similar to a clown preparing to throw mud with both hands,
forgetting he was, and scratching his big nose. Right now he just wrote about a
John Turner's having ignored my "little inconsequential post", when in fact the
"little inconsequential post" was his, Deacon's, not mine.
No. I noticed that little slight, Golescu, but decided to turn the tables.
And you didn't even notice.

Slow?
Post by Ssg217
(N. B.: By the way, when I use the word "senile", no insult to the elderly in
general is implied, as I think it degrading to make fun of somebody *only*
because (s)he aged.
I do believe that an apology is owed to all the "seniors" in this newsgroup
who are impugned by the likes of Golescu by his comments on "senility". We
won't get it, of course, as Golescu is also without shame.

He has a habit of sweeping all his dislikes into one general category. Thus,
because I am older - and wiser, I might add - than he, I instantly become
"senile". I suppose since he is younger than I, I should call him
"juvenile". Tit for tat, butter for fish, you know. In a similar vein,
anyone who protests the Israeli occupation of Palestine is deemed by Golescu
to be "anti-semitic". Which is why he deserves the adjective "fascist".

It's a charming tactic, don't you think, but it doesn't work, of course.
Golescu remains a verbose Roumanian piano-teacher from Urbana whose
favourite occupation is to live in the past. A pianistic Jeffrey Powell, you
might say, but with slightly broader interests. Never met a dead musician he
didn't like.

Not a lot to boast about, but it does make him feel better to put down his
betters. In which case, we should all allow him to get his kicks, such as
they are. What's the harm, after all? It is hardly any skin of anyone's nose
but his own.

And juvenile skin at that.

TD
ansermetniac
2004-07-07 13:01:40 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 07 Jul 2004 08:02:25 -0400, Tom Deacon
Post by Tom Deacon
Israeli occupation of Palestine
You really know your history.

And a message to Samir-if you were NOT singled out by the Deacon of
Dubiousity, I would be worried.

Abbedd


________________

Go To Abbedd's Place For the MP3S of the Week

http://members.aol.com/abbedd/abbedd

Boycot Inglotted CDS
http://home.earthlink.net/~abbedd/noinglottecds.htm

E.A.F.E.
Tom Deacon
2004-07-08 13:08:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by ansermetniac
On Wed, 07 Jul 2004 08:02:25 -0400, Tom Deacon
Post by Tom Deacon
Israeli occupation of Palestine
You really know your history.
Indeed.

What, you think they were occupying Norway?

What a fool!

TD
Ssg217
2004-07-08 15:46:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by ansermetniac
You really know your history.
He knows *his* "history", Jeff, no question about that. However, he is in the
wrong newsgroup. His posts are more adequate for the charter of this other one:

http://tinyurl.com/2t7vq

regards,
SG
Tom Deacon
2004-07-08 18:09:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ssg217
Post by ansermetniac
You really know your history.
He knows *his* "history", Jeff, no question about that. However, he is in the
wrong newsgroup.
No, I am in the right one.

Somebody has to keep tabs on the little prairie fascists which shoot up
every Spring.

You're not the only Arab-Hater among the group, of course. Just one of the
most vocal.

TD
Allan Burns
2004-07-07 21:07:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ssg217
That won't stop him.
Ah. Some people aren't all that good with hints, are they. I could
offer a more strongly worded--let us say vice-presidential--one, but
what's the point of being as vulgar as a former Halliburton exec? I
dropped back in here to be amused and perhaps even edified.

If he wants to keep writing follow-ups to my posts and to continue
exhibiting personality disorders in public, that's his business. I
can't stop him. But I most certainly can and will ignore him.

Back to pianists, eh? Not to put you on the spot, Samir, but I'd be
quite interested in your opinions concerning some of the pianists
we've been discussing and any others from the last twenty years you
consider to be particularly interesting.

Allan
Tom Deacon
2004-07-08 01:08:01 UTC
Permalink
On 7/7/04 5:07 PM, in article
Post by Allan Burns
Back to pianists, eh? Not to put you on the spot, Samir, but I'd be
quite interested in your opinions concerning some of the pianists
we've been discussing and any others from the last twenty years you
consider to be particularly interesting.
Clearly our latest arrival has not been paying attention.

Golescu insists that all the pianists he listen to be dead. Literally, if
not figuratively.

TD
Dan Koren
2004-07-08 05:07:09 UTC
Permalink
Now posting from AOL ?!?

Oh my God!


dk
Post by Ssg217
Post by Allan Burns
Post by Tom Deacon
Do you, in fact, think
Why do you think I want to talk with you?
That won't stop him. LOL, Allan, if it were that simple. He provides some free
entertainment, though, as he is as senile as to be unable to follow who said
what so he's similar to a clown preparing to throw mud with both hands,
forgetting he was, and scratching his big nose. Right now he just wrote about a
John Turner's having ignored my "little inconsequential post", when in fact the
"little inconsequential post" was his, Deacon's, not mine. But who's counting?
(N. B.: By the way, when I use the word "senile", no insult to the elderly in
general is implied, as I think it degrading to make fun of somebody *only*
because (s)he aged. I am quite positive though that Deacon's memory was every
bit as acute and his mental processes were every bit as vivacious fifty years
ago as they are now. In fact probably they are better now. They must be. After
all, any evolution must have been an improvement.)
BTW, good to see you back, Allan. Or are you Anthony? Or Andy? Nevermind.
regards,
SG (I think)
Ssg217
2004-07-08 05:23:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan Koren
Now posting from AOL ?!?
Oh my God!
dk
I know. Me too!

regards,
SG
M.Bartnik
2004-07-05 22:30:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Allan Burns
Unfortunately, the only contemporary pianist
seemingly capable of delivering such competitive performances
consistently is Sokolov, and he hasn't issued a new recording since
1997.
A studio recording, you mean. Otherwise you seem to forget the live DVD from
his Paris recital that was issued recently. And there will be no studio
recitals for him in the future, I can assure you. Anyway, there are lots of
radio broadcasts, so finding live recitals is not really difficult.

M.B.
Allan Burns
2004-07-06 04:40:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by M.Bartnik
hasn't issued a new recording since 1997.
A studio recording, you mean.
The Schubert sonatas were recorded live.
Post by M.Bartnik
Otherwise you seem to forget the live DVD from his Paris recital
I'm just an old-fashioned CD collector.

Allan
M.Bartnik
2004-07-06 16:42:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Allan Burns
Post by M.Bartnik
Otherwise you seem to forget the live DVD from his Paris recital
I'm just an old-fashioned CD collector.
A real pity - you should get yourself a DVD player and watch / hear that
recital. It's really outstanding, and I can only recommend it most warmly.
If the image bothers you, just switch of the TV...
Post by Allan Burns
Allan
M.B.
Andy Evans
2004-07-06 19:34:45 UTC
Permalink
So what about Ovchinikov - where is he? Ou sont les Ovchinikovs d'antan?

=== Andy Evans ===
Visit our Website:- http://www.artsandmedia.com
Audio, music and health pages and interesting links.
Steve Emerson
2004-07-07 16:42:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by M.Bartnik
Post by Allan Burns
Unfortunately, the only contemporary pianist
seemingly capable of delivering such competitive performances
consistently is Sokolov, and he hasn't issued a new recording since
1997.
A studio recording, you mean. Otherwise you seem to forget the live DVD from
his Paris recital that was issued recently.
What are the particulars on this one?

Thanks,
SE.
M.Bartnik
2004-07-07 18:44:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Emerson
Post by M.Bartnik
A studio recording, you mean. Otherwise you seem to forget the live DVD from
his Paris recital that was issued recently.
What are the particulars on this one?
Thanks,
SE.
Steve,

I will quote here an article I gleaned from the website
www.musicalpointers.co.uk and which aptly describes what I admire about this
DVD. The program of it is as follows: Beethoven sonatas op. 14 no. 1, no. 2,
op. 28 "Pastoral"; Komitas Six danses pour piano; Prokofiev sonata no. 7;
encores: Chopin Mazurkas op. 63/3, op. 68/4; Couperin Le tic-toc-choc;
Bach/Siloti Prelude.

Here is the review:

-----------------------------
This DVD is a wonderful opportunity to get to terms with a controversial
"cult" pianist at his best. His recordings from live concerts (many of them
unofficial) are sought after; see the dedicated Sokolov website. Grigory
Sokolov dislikes studio recording. The Paris recital of 2002 is filmed
sensitively and undistractingly by Bruno Monsaingeon, who provides a useful
note about the project, and the sound quality is superb.


Sokolov prepares and perfects a single programme each season, repeating and
honing it to perfection throughout his long annual touring schedule. He is
clearly at his best in a large auditorium and there were reservations about
his recent appearance in London's Wigmore Hall, with critics seriously at
odds with one another (q.v. reviews in The Times and Seen&Heard). His manner
evinces disinterest in his audience, which contributes to the polarisation
of reactions.

Sokolov, whom I admired immoderately in Lucerne, plays recitals in near
darkness and he gave vhis three Beethoven sonatas straight through without
pause for applause or reflection - or for fidgeting and throat clearing
(which might reduce the not infrequent coughing in the background)!

At home you can do likewise of course, or you may prefer, as I did, to have
the scores in front of you to follow the considerable subtleties of his
phrasing and articulation (nothing there in the Beethoven to worry purists,
I thought) and watch the screen during repeats.

Sokolov brings hyper-sensitivity to six seemingly simple dances by the
Armenian ethno-musicologist Komitas (Soghomon Soghomonian, 1865-1935) who
"collected more than 3.000 folk-songs and freed Armenian musical thought
from foreign influences". These, after the interval, provide an oasis of
repose before the overwhelming power of Sokolov's transcendent account of
Prokofiev's great war sonata, No.7 in Bb major. Here is displayed a whole
lexicon of non-legato articulation, underpinned by confidence that the whole
keyboard is under total control for attack from any height, without his ever
needing to look down to where the hand will land, however rapid the moves.
By a stroke of imagination, the obsessive precipitato toccata finale is
filmed in a single held shot throughout to preserve its cumulative effect,
as with the unmoving camera in the classic films of Yasujiro Ozu.

The encores restore charm and elegance with pieces by Couperin, Chopin and
Bach - the last in a Siloti arrangement which suits Sokolov's refined
aesthetic in interpreting popular classic miniatures (Alexander Siloti is an
important, scarce remembered figure and my review of Charles F. Barber's
biography Lost in the Stars: The Forgotten Musical Life of Alexander Siloti
will appear during the summer in Music & Letters).

One tiny cavil; I wondered if Monsaingeon was a pianist, and verified that
he is a concert violinist. For student pianists it is tantalising never to
have an opportunity to study Sokolov's pedalling; that is not obviously
visually arresting for non-pianists, but pedalling holds a great deal of the
secrets which go to create great piano playing (some organ videos likewise
ignore the performer's feet).

But no question, this is a very important DVD which deserves a place in
every piano enthusiast's collection. It is a privilege to join the Parisian
audience at Theatre des Champs-Elysées or, as it were, to bring Sokolov into
one's own living room to savour his interpretations at leisure.

M.B.
Steve Emerson
2004-07-08 18:01:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by M.Bartnik
Post by M.Bartnik
A studio recording, you mean. Otherwise you seem to forget the live DVD
from his Paris recital that was issued recently.
I will quote here an article I gleaned from the website
www.musicalpointers.co.uk
Thanks, Marcel. I was hoping for the name and label of the DVD, I haven't been
able to turn it up.

SE.
M.Bartnik
2004-07-08 20:02:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Emerson
Post by M.Bartnik
I will quote here an article I gleaned from the website
www.musicalpointers.co.uk
Thanks, Marcel. I was hoping for the name and label of the DVD, I haven't been
able to turn it up.
SE.
The label's name is Naïve, from France. The catalogue number of the DVD is
DR2108. The DVD is called "Grigory Sokolov live in Paris". The concert is
from the 4th November 2002, in the Théâtre des Champs-Elysées. Here's the
link for amazon.com:
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B0000T4U3Y/qid=1089316837/sr=8-1/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i1_xgl74/102-6851783-6260922?v=glance&s=dvd&n=507846

or, easier: http://makeashorterlink.com/?B23A321C8

I hope this helps and add another review below.

M.B.

----------------------------
Reviewed by: Colin Andersen /
http://www.classicalsource.com/db_control/db_cd_review.php?id=1668

Here is a wonderful matching of musical individuality and perception - the
whole of a live recital with Grigory Sokolov in commanding form. The
pictures are secondary, save for adding value when it comes to registering
the pianist's reactions. Despite the director being Bruno Monsaingeon,
certain filmic devices, such as the camera drawing away as a movement ends,
are predictable. The sound is first-rate though.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----
Not for the first time one listens and views the picture occasionally; the
alchemy of sound itself is more telling and doesn't need an image to sustain
it. The important thing here is how Sokolov interprets the music. His weight
and dynamic amplitude is never gratuitous, and most often it's his dexterity
and a carefully considered range of touch and sonority that stands out; most
important is that all seems right for the music, and all seems spontaneous
despite the no-doubt lengthy preparation. As for the pictures, Sokolov is
anti-display; his movements are wholly natural and 'in sync' with the music.
This is a man who communicates through his intellect and fingers, through
sound.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----
A wonderfully time-taken Pastoral sonata, which exists here as sonorous,
melodically explicit, harmonically profound and sensorial in its searching -
an account that without drawing attention to itself sheds new light on the
work's possibilities, not least its playful ones. The finale is perfect in
pace, the left-hand rocking gently, with the 'simple' tune in the right made
hypnotic. I am, though, dismayed that Sokolov spurns the exposition repeat.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----
Following are Six Dances of Sogomon Komitas (1869-1935) of whom I know
nothing, and on whom the booklet supplies only the dates just given. I guess
he was Turkish. Certainly these six not-so-miniature Dances exude Oriental
promise and the 'authentic' scale passages that create exotic soundscapes
are maybe transcriptions of indigenous material as played on national
instruments. Sokolov is as absorbed by this work as he is by the 'greater'
music that surrounds it.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----
The Prokofiev sonata, often used and abused to display technical
wherewithal and to 'impress' an audience through fast and loud playing,
finds Sokolov above such things. He searches the explosive and interior
aspects of this usually taken-for-granted piece and shows its elusive and
deeper sides. The result is a revelation, not least in the finale, given
with articulate rhythms and cumulative purpose - dogged rather than easy.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----
Of the five encores, the two Chopin mazurkas are exquisite without being
precious, and two Couperin Ordre movements are effervescent, the ornaments
in Soeur Monique delightfully integrated. He doesn't bask in the applause; a
nod to the audience and he's gone. Siloti's transcription of Bach's B minor
Prelude is a consolatory way of ending.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----
My colleague, Ying Chang, reviewing his recent Wigmore Hall recital,
suggests that Sokolov is the greatest living pianist. I understand that. I
would rather say 'one of'. Certainly Sokolov makes some of the hyped
pianists seem mere pretenders.
Allan Burns
2004-07-08 22:06:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Emerson
I was hoping for the name and label of the DVD, I haven't been
able to turn it up.
I found it at Amazon by searching under DVDs for "Sokolov." They list
the title as "Grigory Sokolov - Live in Paris."

Here's some additional info:

Encoding: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. This DVD will probably NOT
be viewable in other countries....)
Format: Color
Studio: Naxos of America
DVD Release Date: February 17, 2004
ASIN: B0000T4U3Y

Runs about $20. I'll have to break down and get this at some point.

Allan
M.Bartnik
2004-07-06 16:15:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Allan Burns
I don't keep up with the careers of every pianist out there, but for
my money, the ten most interesting classical pianists who have built
Leif Ove Andsnes
Excellent choice. His Brahms concerto with Rattle is among my favorites, and
his Grieg, Janacek, Haydn and Schumann are first-rate. I recently heard him
playing Debussy very convincingly, too - he should record it one day. By the
way, his next disc will be Rachmaninov's first and second concertos.
Post by Allan Burns
Nikolai Demidenko
Also one of my favorites - his last Beethoven CD (with the Hammerklavier)
was outstanding. I liked his first Bach/Busoni-CD, not the second; his
Medtner-CD is superb as well; not the Prokofiev concertos, though.
Post by Allan Burns
Helene Grimaud
I don't like everything she does - her Brahms and Beethoven are very good to
my ears, her Rachmaninov a little too sentimental and slow. I also liked her
last CD with the title "Credo", even if there might be better
interpretations of these works individually.
Post by Allan Burns
Marc-André Hamelin
Known for his curiosity and outstanding technical prowess. I doubt there's
any living pianist (besides Katsaris, maybe) with a larger repertoire. He
has led me to discover many forgotten composers, such as Alkan, Medtner,
Catoire, Kapustin... His Liszt CDs are quite good, too. In fact, there are
few reservations on my part for this pianist - maybe that he sounds
sometimes a bit emotionally uninvolved.
Post by Allan Burns
Stephen Hough
Fast fingers. I liked his Saint-Saens concertos, his Liebermann and Franck
CDs and his Hummel recordings. In other repertoire I didn't find him that
convincing - Brahms and Liszt for example, and his latest Chopin CD is to be
avoided, very bland.
Post by Allan Burns
Mikhail Pletnev
Excellent pianist. Although I sometimes have the suspicion he just plays
differently because it's different, and not because he truly believes in
playing that way. Sometimes distorts the music, doesn't follow the written
score - in instances it is quite thrilling, more often I find it annoying.
Post by Allan Burns
Sergey Schepkin
Grigory Sokolov
Arcadi Volodos
I know Tom Deacon will post something negative about him, but I like what he
does. Just a pity that his concert repertoire is somewhat narrow. I just
heard him in concert with two Beethoven sonatas that were played really
well. And his virtuosity sometimes defies belief - simply awe-inspiring.
Post by Allan Burns
Krystian Zimerman
Outstanding pianist, but he mostly leaves me cold. Sounds calculated,
especially in Chopin. Not my cup of tea.

M.B.
Wayne Reimer
2004-07-06 21:49:11 UTC
Permalink
In article <ccej6d$2fmb$***@ulysses.news.tiscali.de>, ***@gmx.de
says...
<...>
Post by M.Bartnik
Post by Allan Burns
Marc-André Hamelin
Known for his curiosity and outstanding technical prowess. I doubt there's
any living pianist (besides Katsaris, maybe) with a larger repertoire. He
has led me to discover many forgotten composers, such as Alkan, Medtner,
Catoire, Kapustin... His Liszt CDs are quite good, too.
They vary. The first one on Music and Arts was dreadful. Some of his other
Liszt is pretty good, but not consistantly so. His cadenza to the 2nd rhapsody
has to be heard to be disbelieved, but then, that's not Liszt.

<...>

wr
M.Bartnik
2004-07-06 22:46:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Wayne Reimer
Post by M.Bartnik
Known for his curiosity and outstanding technical prowess. I doubt there's
any living pianist (besides Katsaris, maybe) with a larger repertoire. He
has led me to discover many forgotten composers, such as Alkan, Medtner,
Catoire, Kapustin... His Liszt CDs are quite good, too.
They vary. The first one on Music and Arts was dreadful.
I disagree here. Even if not all of the pieces were excellent, there were
some that made me hold my breath and which I have not yet heard played
better. But then, there is more than one way to play - and to like - Liszt,
of course. I have more reservations about his first Hyperion Liszt-CD,
where - especially in the Hungarian Rhapsodies - he lacks a bit of the crazy
fire that I like in Cziffra, for example.
Post by Wayne Reimer
Some of his other
Liszt is pretty good, but not consistantly so. His cadenza to the 2nd rhapsody
has to be heard to be disbelieved, but then, that's not Liszt.
I also liked his most recent CD with the Paganini-Études and the
Schubert/Liszt marches very much. I saw him play this recital, in fact, and
it was an impressive performance - especially the marches were much more
difficult than I first thought. The Paganini studies are played very
elegantly, not with the force of Kissin, for example, but it suits them much
better, I think.
Post by Wayne Reimer
wr
M.B.
Allan Burns
2004-07-06 23:43:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by M.Bartnik
Post by Allan Burns
Leif Ove Andsnes
Excellent choice. His Brahms concerto with Rattle is among my favorites, and
his Grieg, Janacek, Haydn and Schumann are first-rate. I recently heard him
playing Debussy very convincingly, too - he should record it one day. By the
way, his next disc will be Rachmaninov's first and second concertos.
Thanks for the information. I actually wish he'd record more Tveitt,
particularly the complete Femti Folkatonar frao Hardanger, Op. 150.
Post by M.Bartnik
Post by Allan Burns
Stephen Hough
Fast fingers. I liked his Saint-Saens concertos, his Liebermann and Franck
CDs and his Hummel recordings. In other repertoire I didn't find him that
convincing - Brahms and Liszt for example, and his latest Chopin CD is to be
avoided, very bland.
It's impossible to disagree that he tends to be at his best in
repertoire off the beaten track--but in it he's very good indeed.
Scharwenka and Mompou and the various miniatures on his "piano albums"
would be other examples. He also (along with Pletnev and Volodos)
deserves credit for helping keep alive the art of transcription.
Post by M.Bartnik
Post by Allan Burns
Arcadi Volodos
[. . .] Just a pity that his concert repertoire is somewhat narrow.
He's still quite young.


Allan
Ivailo Partchev
2004-07-06 12:52:36 UTC
Permalink
Louis Lortie
M.Bartnik
2004-07-06 16:03:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Slrdsyj
For those of you who are classical recording buffs and connoisseurs, I'd
like to know your opinions of these pianists, pianists who have been noted for
- Andre Watts
Technically competent, but musically not first-rate. His Paganini-Etudes are
quite good.
Post by Slrdsyj
- Mischa Dichter
- Jean-Yves Thibaudet
I like his Ravel and Debussy, but his Liszt is too restrained for me, and
his Rachmaninov just too light-hearted. Technically he is one of the best
around - I attended a recital of his not so long ago and had difficulties
noticing a single wrong note during some of the most difficult
Liszt-transcriptions.
Post by Slrdsyj
- Carter Larsen
- Angela Hewitt
Her Bach playing has been discussed in this NG quite often. I tend to like
it, even if I prefer Koroliov. Avoid her Couperin. Her Ravel is not elegant
enough for me.
Post by Slrdsyj
- Joanna MacGregor
Very interesting artist. I watched her playing some Preludes&Fugues from the
WTK - really excellent.
Post by Slrdsyj
- Wayne Marshall
Does he play anything besides Gershwin?
Post by Slrdsyj
- Alan Kogosowski (sp?)
M.B.
g***@gmail.com
2014-07-22 00:44:06 UTC
Permalink
Does anyone have anything to say about the pianist Gary Goldschneider?
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