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Joseph Moog's new cd of Strauss' "Burlesque", Brahms' 2nd PC
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Bozo
2018-06-19 17:02:47 UTC
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Joseph Moog’s Onyx cd , apparently released early in 2018, recorded in 2016, of Strauss’ “Burlesque” and Brahms’ 2nd PC, German Radio Orchestra,Nichols Milton , a reading of the Brahms I suspect will generate very differing listener reactions :

( Burlesque )

( 2nd PC , part 1 of 4 at YT ) )

What worked well here for young Strauss did not “ translate “ as well , for me, to old Brahms. Moog knew to whom he would be compared, presumably his conscious choice to adopt the tempos,attack, and touch / tone here, but credit due for the “ re-thinking.”

Stephen Hough, quoted in The Guardian, 2014 : “ For all the grandeur and excitement of the first concerto's youthful flare, the second's older vintage seemed wiser, more fascinatingly complex as I revisited and re-recorded both pieces last year. Its musical arguments seemed more nuanced, more open to exploration, more a search for common ground where, as in life, the sun can shine brightest ... and warmest.”

But perhaps Moog was inspired by pianist Jeremy Denk’s “alarming” thesis that the 2nd Concerto has been getting longer :

http://jeremydenk.net/blog/2009/12/18/whose-brahms/

“ And now it became clear to me, that tempo is more dangerous than an illusion, it is a kind of myth promulgated by all sorts of fascist types in order to destroy the natural and beautiful cycles of PDT (perceived desired tempo ) that are native to the human freedom instinct. The next time a conductor asks me “why are you moving so much faster here?,” referring to some passage X of a concerto, I will simply say “natural variability of sunspots,” and when the conductor says “that’s ridiculous,” I will say “you can’t prove to me it’s NOT sunspots.” I’m sure this will go over very well. “
m***@gmail.com
2018-07-23 16:08:14 UTC
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Post by Bozo
http://youtu.be/mK4LC-dU1bA ( Burlesque )
http://youtu.be/aa4fXKWvGK0 ( 2nd PC , part 1 of 4 at YT ) )
What worked well here for young Strauss did not “ translate “ as well , for me, to old Brahms. Moog knew to whom he would be compared, presumably his conscious choice to adopt the tempos,attack, and touch / tone here, but credit due for the “ re-thinking.”
Stephen Hough, quoted in The Guardian, 2014 : “ For all the grandeur and excitement of the first concerto's youthful flare, the second's older vintage seemed wiser, more fascinatingly complex as I revisited and re-recorded both pieces last year. Its musical arguments seemed more nuanced, more open to exploration, more a search for common ground where, as in life, the sun can shine brightest ... and warmest.”
http://jeremydenk.net/blog/2009/12/18/whose-brahms/
“ And now it became clear to me, that tempo is more dangerous than an illusion, it is a kind of myth promulgated by all sorts of fascist types in order to destroy the natural and beautiful cycles of PDT (perceived desired tempo ) that are native to the human freedom instinct. The next time a conductor asks me “why are you moving so much faster here?,” referring to some passage X of a concerto, I will simply say “natural variability of sunspots,” and when the conductor says “that’s ridiculous,” I will say “you can’t prove to me it’s NOT sunspots.” I’m sure this will go over very well. “
I have liked Moog as a very enterprising pianist, his recordings managed to mix the well-known with the obscure.

I listened a few times to his Brahms2 but couldn't get myself to warm to it. Technically well played, yes, but musically rather bland, with none of the tonal warmth and instinctive balancing of power and speed that I like so much in other pianists. My own favorites are Nelson Freire and Emil Gilels - both incomparable in this work.

The Burleske works much better indeed, that was also my impression. Even if I didn't quite hear the variety that Argerich can get out of this piece.
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