Discussion:
Seong-Jin Cho plays Schumann
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JohnGavin
2015-10-24 19:10:24 UTC
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Here is a video of Seong-Jin Cho, winner of the Chopin Competition, playing Schumann's Humoresque at age 17:




I hear in his playing an uncommon mastery of inner voicing, and wonderful sensitivity and poise.
AB
2015-10-24 21:11:35 UTC
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Post by JohnGavin
http://youtu.be/gtngm8jIYdg
I hear in his playing an uncommon mastery of inner voicing, and wonderful sensitivity and poise.
yeah, these kinds of talents, Cho, Kissiin, Grosvenor, etc. show up early..... I have a recital by Cho, age 15 where he sounds and plays like a fully mature pianist.

AB
dk
2015-10-25 00:33:08 UTC
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Post by JohnGavin
Here is a video of Seong-Jin Cho, winner of the
Chopin Competition, playing Schumann's Humoresque
http://youtu.be/gtngm8jIYdg
I hear in his playing an uncommon mastery of inner
voicing, and wonderful sensitivity and poise.
Yeol Eum Som much better

recorded at the same 2011 Tchaikovsky Competition.
Enjoy!
dk
laraine
2015-10-29 02:05:37 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by JohnGavin
Here is a video of Seong-Jin Cho, winner of the
Chopin Competition, playing Schumann's Humoresque
http://youtu.be/gtngm8jIYdg
I hear in his playing an uncommon mastery of inner
voicing, and wonderful sensitivity and poise.
Yeol Eum Som much better http://youtu.be/irSqIydc0ko
recorded at the same 2011 Tchaikovsky Competition.
Enjoy!
dk
That actually is a very fine interpretation by Son.
When I heard it in 2011, I thought it too drawn out
and quiet, but there is a lot going on in there that
I had missed.

Cho's also is nice in a more direct sonorous way,
but he doesn't play that kind of mature interpretation.

C.
Tony
2015-10-29 08:53:51 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by JohnGavin
Here is a video of Seong-Jin Cho, winner of the
Chopin Competition, playing Schumann's Humoresque
http://youtu.be/gtngm8jIYdg
I hear in his playing an uncommon mastery of inner
voicing, and wonderful sensitivity and poise.
Yeol Eum Som much better http://youtu.be/irSqIydc0ko
recorded at the same 2011 Tchaikovsky Competition.
Enjoy!
dk
Thanks Dan. I hope that's typical of her playing because it was very beautiful.
Bozo
2015-10-25 19:31:01 UTC
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And Cho , at age 17, first piece at the 2011 Tchaikovsky , LvB Op.110 :



And Som's first at that 2011 was LvB Op. 111 :



Too hard for adults, and too hard for children.
dk
2015-10-26 19:26:27 UTC
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Post by Bozo
http://youtu.be/H_95f9CrilY
http://youtu.be/PuhYzlAur8w
Too hard for adults, and too hard for children.
I like YES much more than Cho, to the extent a
comparison can be made based on different works.
And I like HJ Lim much better than both in both
works!

dk
HT
2015-10-26 20:53:31 UTC
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Post by dk
I like YES much more than Cho, to the extent a
comparison can be made based on different works.
And I like HJ Lim much better than both in both
works!
Schumann isn't Cho's cup of tea - at lest not at that age. He's a (self-declared) Chopinist, and I tend to agree with him. He should continue playing Chopin.

Henk
laraine
2015-10-27 21:36:53 UTC
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Post by HT
Post by dk
I like YES much more than Cho, to the extent a
comparison can be made based on different works.
And I like HJ Lim much better than both in both
works!
Schumann isn't Cho's cup of tea - at lest not at that age. He's a (self-declared) Chopinist, and I tend to agree with him. He should continue playing Chopin.
Henk
I actually got the impression (no pun intended) that he was a
Ravelist, but his Schumann Humoresque and some of his Chopin
seemed very good. Maybe he'll now have the chance to record
some of the Ravel that he played at competitions.

Son, on the other hand, played some beautiful Debussy
preludes at the Cliburn 2009. She was a 2nd or 3rd rounder
at the 2005 Chopin competition too.

C.
Bozo
2015-10-28 02:19:42 UTC
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Post by laraine
Son, on the other hand, played some beautiful Debussy
preludes at the Cliburn 2009. She was a 2nd or 3rd rounder
at the 2005 Chopin competition too.
And here she is , 10-years later , still on the competition circuit.

Competitions may be a necessary evil, but seems a Faustian bargain.
laraine
2015-10-28 23:14:55 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Post by laraine
Son, on the other hand, played some beautiful Debussy
preludes at the Cliburn 2009. She was a 2nd or 3rd rounder
at the 2005 Chopin competition too.
And here she is , 10-years later , still on the competition circuit.
Competitions may be a necessary evil, but seems a Faustian bargain.
Or paying one's dues maybe? (the hard way)

I notice Son has recorded a CD of Samuragochi Mamoru, the
Japanese composer who might have had a ghostwriter...

C.
dk
2015-10-30 05:24:35 UTC
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Post by laraine
Son, on the other hand, played some beautiful Debussy
preludes at the Cliburn 2009. She was a 2nd or 3rd rounder
at the 2005 Chopin competition too.
And here she is, 10-years later, still on the competition circuit.
?!? YES is no longer on the competition circuit.
She doesn't need to.

dk
Bozo
2015-10-31 00:50:17 UTC
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Post by dk
?!? YES is no longer on the competition circuit.
She doesn't need to.
Really ? Per Wiki :

* 1997: 2nd Prize, International Tchaikovsky Competition for Young Musicians
* 1999: 1st Prize, Oberlin International Piano Competition
* 2001: 1st Prize, The 7th Ettlingen Piano Competition
* 2002: 1st Prize, 53rd Viotti International Music Competition
* 2005: 3rd Prize, Arthur Rubinstein International Piano Master Competition
* 2005: Chopin Competition ( per Laraine,not Wiki )
* 2009: Silver Medal and Steven De Groote Memorial Award for the Best Performance of Chamber Music (shared with Evgeni Bozhanov), Thirteenth Van Cliburn International Piano Competition
* 2011: 2nd Prize, Best Chamber Concerto (Mozart Concerto) Performance, Best Performance of the Commissioned Work (by Rodion Shchedrin) XIV International Tchaikovsky Competition
* 2015 Chopin Competition
laraine
2015-10-31 01:47:49 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Post by dk
?!? YES is no longer on the competition circuit.
She doesn't need to.
* 1997: 2nd Prize, International Tchaikovsky Competition for Young Musicians
* 1999: 1st Prize, Oberlin International Piano Competition
* 2001: 1st Prize, The 7th Ettlingen Piano Competition
* 2002: 1st Prize, 53rd Viotti International Music Competition
* 2005: 3rd Prize, Arthur Rubinstein International Piano Master Competition
* 2005: Chopin Competition ( per Laraine,not Wiki )
* 2009: Silver Medal and Steven De Groote Memorial Award for the Best Performance of Chamber Music (shared with Evgeni Bozhanov), Thirteenth Van Cliburn International Piano Competition
* 2011: 2nd Prize, Best Chamber Concerto (Mozart Concerto) Performance, Best Performance of the Commissioned Work (by Rodion Shchedrin) XIV International Tchaikovsky Competition
* 2015 Chopin Competition
I think that last "2015 Chopin Competition" is a mistake,
unless she was one of the 3-400+ (?) who applied.

It seems she was in the top 12 in the 2005 Chopin
Competition and got a distinction:

http://chopincompetition2015.com/previous-editions/520?tab=details

C.
Bozo
2015-10-31 13:40:52 UTC
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Post by laraine
I think that last "2015 Chopin Competition" is a mistake,
unless she was one of the 3-400+ (?) who applied.
You and DK are correct. It was Su Yeon Kim in the 2015 Chopin , thru the 3rd Stage , did not go to Finals.
dk
2015-10-31 07:50:34 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Post by dk
?!? YES is no longer on the competition circuit.
She doesn't need to.
* 2015 Chopin Competition
Erroneous, she did not enter any competitions after
winning the silver at Tchaikovsky in 2011. A silver
from one of the top tier piano competitions (Van
Cliburn, Tchaikovsky, Chopin) is typically good
enough to start concert and recording careers.
QE and MLJT have lost a great deal of their
standing, now the Rubinstein is probably
the best of the second tier competitions.

dk
laraine
2015-10-31 20:39:07 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by Bozo
Post by dk
?!? YES is no longer on the competition circuit.
She doesn't need to.
* 2015 Chopin Competition
Erroneous, she did not enter any competitions after
winning the silver at Tchaikovsky in 2011. A silver
from one of the top tier piano competitions (Van
Cliburn, Tchaikovsky, Chopin) is typically good
enough to start concert and recording careers.
QE and MLJT have lost a great deal of their
standing, now the Rubinstein is probably
the best of the second tier competitions.
dk
What does MLJT stand for? I couldn't think of it.

C.
Tony
2015-10-31 23:59:06 UTC
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Post by laraine
What does MLJT stand for? I couldn't think of it.
C.
Given Dan's love of dreaming up competitions, it could be anything from My Long Johns Test to Ma, Listen, Jingly Tune. I don't know what it is either, but for some reason he's got me thinking that this is another acronym leading to Asia :)
Ricardo Jimenez
2015-11-01 02:58:22 UTC
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Post by laraine
Post by dk
Post by Bozo
Post by dk
?!? YES is no longer on the competition circuit.
She doesn't need to.
* 2015 Chopin Competition
Erroneous, she did not enter any competitions after
winning the silver at Tchaikovsky in 2011. A silver
from one of the top tier piano competitions (Van
Cliburn, Tchaikovsky, Chopin) is typically good
enough to start concert and recording careers.
QE and MLJT have lost a great deal of their
standing, now the Rubinstein is probably
the best of the second tier competitions.
dk
What does MLJT stand for? I couldn't think of it.
C.
It's a reference to the Long-Thibaud-Crespin Competition for
obviously, pianists, violinists and singers.
http://www.long-thibaud-crespin.org/
laraine
2015-11-01 04:08:47 UTC
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Post by Ricardo Jimenez
Post by laraine
Post by dk
Post by Bozo
Post by dk
?!? YES is no longer on the competition circuit.
She doesn't need to.
* 2015 Chopin Competition
Erroneous, she did not enter any competitions after
winning the silver at Tchaikovsky in 2011. A silver
from one of the top tier piano competitions (Van
Cliburn, Tchaikovsky, Chopin) is typically good
enough to start concert and recording careers.
QE and MLJT have lost a great deal of their
standing, now the Rubinstein is probably
the best of the second tier competitions.
dk
What does MLJT stand for? I couldn't think of it.
C.
It's a reference to the Long-Thibaud-Crespin Competition for
obviously, pianists, violinists and singers.
http://www.long-thibaud-crespin.org/
A challenging repertoire to play for the piano contestants...
They just finished that competition, and a 16-yr old (male)
from the UK, Julian Trevelyan, won 2nd place (no 1st).

Madoka Fukami, who might be the same person who performed in the
1st round of the Chopin, came in 5th.

C.
laraine
2015-11-01 04:28:18 UTC
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Post by laraine
Madoka Fukami, who might be the same person who performed in the
1st round of the Chopin, came in 5th.
C.
Actually, she played in the Chopin April round only... preliminary

C.
dk
2015-11-01 03:23:52 UTC
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Post by laraine
Post by dk
Post by Bozo
Post by dk
?!? YES is no longer on the competition circuit.
She doesn't need to.
* 2015 Chopin Competition
Erroneous, she did not enter any competitions after
winning the silver at Tchaikovsky in 2011. A silver
from one of the top tier piano competitions (Van
Cliburn, Tchaikovsky, Chopin) is typically good
enough to start concert and recording careers.
QE and MLJT have lost a great deal of their
standing, now the Rubinstein is probably
the best of the second tier competitions.
What does MLJT stand for? I couldn't think of it.
Concours International Marguerite Long Jacques Thibaud.
Used to be the French equivalent of the Tchaikovsky, but
since the French cannot agree about the greatest French
composer (or even if they had one!), it was named after
a pianist and a fiddler.

dk
laraine
2015-11-01 03:30:20 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by laraine
Post by dk
Post by Bozo
Post by dk
?!? YES is no longer on the competition circuit.
She doesn't need to.
* 2015 Chopin Competition
Erroneous, she did not enter any competitions after
winning the silver at Tchaikovsky in 2011. A silver
from one of the top tier piano competitions (Van
Cliburn, Tchaikovsky, Chopin) is typically good
enough to start concert and recording careers.
QE and MLJT have lost a great deal of their
standing, now the Rubinstein is probably
the best of the second tier competitions.
What does MLJT stand for? I couldn't think of it.
Concours International Marguerite Long Jacques Thibaud.
Used to be the French equivalent of the Tchaikovsky, but
since the French cannot agree about the greatest French
composer (or even if they had one!), it was named after
a pianist and a fiddler.
dk
Ok, so Tony got the "Long" correct.
I was about to say it might be something like
Montreal Junior Training...

Isn't the Montreal Competition pretty important
for the French these days, esp. considering
that Canada just had two laureates in the Chopin..
And Beatrice Rana, who seems to be doing well, won
it not too long ago.

C.
dk
2015-11-01 04:08:17 UTC
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Post by laraine
Post by dk
Post by laraine
Post by dk
Post by Bozo
Post by dk
?!? YES is no longer on the competition circuit.
She doesn't need to.
* 2015 Chopin Competition
Erroneous, she did not enter any competitions after
winning the silver at Tchaikovsky in 2011. A silver
from one of the top tier piano competitions (Van
Cliburn, Tchaikovsky, Chopin) is typically good
enough to start concert and recording careers.
QE and MLJT have lost a great deal of their
standing, now the Rubinstein is probably
the best of the second tier competitions.
What does MLJT stand for? I couldn't think of it.
Concours International Marguerite Long Jacques Thibaud.
Used to be the French equivalent of the Tchaikovsky, but
since the French cannot agree about the greatest French
composer (or even if they had one!), it was named after
a pianist and a fiddler.
Ok, so Tony got the "Long" correct.
I was about to say it might be something like
Montreal Junior Training...
Isn't the Montreal Competition pretty important
for the French these days, esp. considering
that Canada just had two laureates in the Chopin..
The Montreal has not produced a major talent since
Pogo won it in 1980.
Post by laraine
And Beatrice Rana, who seems to be doing well,
won it not too long ago.
Beatrice Rana is a chamber pianist with little power
or personality.

dk
laraine
2015-11-01 04:17:19 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by laraine
Post by dk
Post by laraine
Post by dk
Post by Bozo
Post by dk
?!? YES is no longer on the competition circuit.
She doesn't need to.
* 2015 Chopin Competition
Erroneous, she did not enter any competitions after
winning the silver at Tchaikovsky in 2011. A silver
from one of the top tier piano competitions (Van
Cliburn, Tchaikovsky, Chopin) is typically good
enough to start concert and recording careers.
QE and MLJT have lost a great deal of their
standing, now the Rubinstein is probably
the best of the second tier competitions.
What does MLJT stand for? I couldn't think of it.
Concours International Marguerite Long Jacques Thibaud.
Used to be the French equivalent of the Tchaikovsky, but
since the French cannot agree about the greatest French
composer (or even if they had one!), it was named after
a pianist and a fiddler.
Ok, so Tony got the "Long" correct.
I was about to say it might be something like
Montreal Junior Training...
Isn't the Montreal Competition pretty important
for the French these days, esp. considering
that Canada just had two laureates in the Chopin..
The Montreal has not produced a major talent since
Pogo won it in 1980.
Post by laraine
And Beatrice Rana, who seems to be doing well,
won it not too long ago.
Beatrice Rana is a chamber pianist with little power
or personality.
I think you're hasty on that one.
Don't know about the power, but she plays a number
of pieces extremely well with definite personality,
might be a little inconsistent on others...
give her time on that.

I believe Montreal has violin as well.

C.
Post by dk
dk
Herman
2015-11-01 08:48:15 UTC
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Post by laraine
Post by dk
Beatrice Rana is a chamber pianist with little power
or personality.
I think you're hasty on that one.
Don't know about the power, but she plays a number
of pieces extremely well with definite personality,
might be a little inconsistent on others...
give her time on that.
DK's only criterion (except a preference for long flat hair) is LOUD.

If a pianist doesn't play loud he's out.
dk
2015-11-01 09:15:07 UTC
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Post by Herman
Post by laraine
Post by dk
Beatrice Rana is a chamber pianist with little power
or personality.
I think you're hasty on that one.
Don't know about the power, but she plays a number
of pieces extremely well with definite personality,
might be a little inconsistent on others...
give her time on that.
DK's only criterion (except a preference for long flat hair) is LOUD.
If a pianist doesn't play loud he's out.
Bullshit! YES does not play "loud". Neither does Radu Lupu.
You are making things up because you are a bigoted racist.
Here's loud for you:

"Child exploitation"?

dk
Herman
2015-11-02 07:21:26 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by Herman
Post by laraine
Post by dk
Beatrice Rana is a chamber pianist with little power
or personality.
I think you're hasty on that one.
Don't know about the power, but she plays a number
of pieces extremely well with definite personality,
might be a little inconsistent on others...
give her time on that.
DK's only criterion (except a preference for long flat hair) is LOUD.
If a pianist doesn't play loud he's out.
Bullshit! YES does not play "loud". Neither does Radu Lupu.
You are making things up because you are a bigoted racist.
dk
1 You have formulated the loud thing yourself. If a pianist couldn't play really loud, he or she was no good.

2 You are the one who consistently identifies pianists by the ethnic origin, to drive home your kind of Spenglerian notion that a new race (supply any acronym) is taking over soloist supremacy from the weaker European oriented generations.

To explain the many different ways this is creepy would take too much time.
dk
2015-11-02 08:24:49 UTC
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Post by Herman
Post by dk
Post by Herman
Post by laraine
Post by dk
Beatrice Rana is a chamber pianist with little power
or personality.
I think you're hasty on that one.
Don't know about the power, but she plays a number
of pieces extremely well with definite personality,
might be a little inconsistent on others...
give her time on that.
DK's only criterion (except a preference for long flat hair) is LOUD.
If a pianist doesn't play loud he's out.
Bullshit! YES does not play "loud". Neither does Radu Lupu.
You are making things up because you are a bigoted racist.
1 You have formulated the loud thing yourself. If a pianist couldn't
play really loud, he or she was no good.
?!? Where did you read that ?!?
Post by Herman
2 You are the one who consistently identifies pianists by the ethnic
Post by dk
origin,
No I do not "identify pianists by ethnic origin". National piano schools
do have characteristics, and there is nothing wrong with discussing
them.
Post by Herman
to drive home your kind of Spenglerian notion that a new race
(supply any acronym) is taking over soloist supremacy from the
weaker European oriented generations.
Clearly your own paranoia. Statistics are statistics, and there is
no point in arguing with the numbers. Your problem is that you
read between lines and imagine others' intent. Oftentimes, when
people read between lines they are far more likely to project their
own prejudices than to retrieve any real information. If one reads
your own rants against Asian pianists your bigoted racism comes
across loud and clear.

dk
dk
2015-11-02 08:34:06 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by Herman
Post by dk
Post by Herman
Post by laraine
Post by dk
Beatrice Rana is a chamber pianist with little power
or personality.
I think you're hasty on that one.
Don't know about the power, but she plays a number
of pieces extremely well with definite personality,
might be a little inconsistent on others...
give her time on that.
DK's only criterion (except a preference for long flat hair) is LOUD.
If a pianist doesn't play loud he's out.
Bullshit! YES does not play "loud". Neither does Radu Lupu.
You are making things up because you are a bigoted racist.
1 You have formulated the loud thing yourself. If a pianist couldn't
play really loud, he or she was no good.
?!? Where did you read that ?!?
Post by Herman
2 You are the one who consistently identifies pianists by the ethnic
Post by dk
origin,
No I do not "identify pianists by ethnic origin". National piano schools
do have characteristics, and there is nothing wrong with discussing
them.
Post by Herman
to drive home your kind of Spenglerian notion that a new race
(supply any acronym) is taking over soloist supremacy from the
weaker European oriented generations.
Clearly your own paranoia. Statistics are statistics, and there is
no point in arguing with the numbers. Your problem is that you
read between lines and imagine others' intent. Oftentimes, when
people read between lines they are far more likely to project their
own prejudices than to retrieve any real information. If one reads
your own rants against Asian pianists your bigoted racism comes
across loud and clear.
Check this:
http://diversity.berkeley.edu/undergraduate-students-current-census
and explain.

dk
HT
2015-11-01 11:01:42 UTC
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Post by laraine
I think you're hasty on that one.
Don't know about the power, but she plays a number
of pieces extremely well with definite personality,
might be a little inconsistent on others...
give her time on that.
Agreed! And, as you say, she isn't very consistent. I have no idea why, though. Concentration? Lack of affinity with certain (romantic) pieces?

Henk
laraine
2015-11-03 00:50:31 UTC
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Post by HT
Post by laraine
I think you're hasty on that one.
Don't know about the power, but she plays a number
of pieces extremely well with definite personality,
might be a little inconsistent on others...
give her time on that.
Agreed! And, as you say, she isn't very consistent. I have no idea why, though. Concentration? Lack of affinity with certain (romantic) pieces?
Henk
She seemed a little cool to me at some times, not at other times.
Maybe that was just competition stoicism.

Or she might be more comfortable with contemporary music style than
we who are much older.

C.
Bozo
2015-11-01 14:56:12 UTC
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Post by dk
Beatrice Rana is a chamber pianist with little power
or personality.
?? Isn't one of her concertos the Prok 2, which requires both ?
Oscar
2015-11-01 09:16:43 UTC
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Post by dk
Concours International Marguerite Long Jacques Thibaud.
Used to be the French equivalent of the Tchaikovsky, but
since the French cannot agree about the greatest French
composer (or even if they had one!), it was named after
a pianist and a fiddler.
Uhhh...Janequin?
dk
2015-11-02 02:28:17 UTC
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Post by Oscar
Post by dk
Concours International Marguerite Long Jacques Thibaud.
Used to be the French equivalent of the Tchaikovsky, but
since the French cannot agree about the greatest French
composer (or even if they had one!), it was named after
a pianist and a fiddler.
Uhhh...Janequin?
Hardly a composer of piano, violin or orchestral music.

dk
Bozo
2015-11-01 15:15:23 UTC
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The Leeds Competition has been worth following.Per Wiki :

2015 Anna Tcybuleva
2012 Federico Colli ( Louis Schwizgebel 2nd )
2009 Sofya Gulyak
2006 Sunwook Kim
2003 Antti Siirala
2000 Alessio Bax ( Severin von Eckardstein 3rd )
1996 Ilya Itan
1993 Ricardo Castro ( Leon McCawley 2nd )
1990 Artur Pizarro ( Lars Vogt 2nd , Eric Le Sage 3rd )
1987 Vladimir Ovchinnikov ( Noriko Ogawa 3rd , Boris Berezovsky 4th )
1984 Jon Kimura Parker
1981 Ian Hobson
1978 Michael Dalberto
1975 Dimitri Alexeev ( Mitsuko Uchida 2nd , Andras Schiff 3rd )
1972 Murray Persia
1969 Radu Lupu ( Georges Pludermacher 2nd, Arthur Moreira Lima 3rd )
1966 Rafael Orozco


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leeds_International_Piano_Competition
dk
2015-11-01 17:28:25 UTC
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Post by Bozo
2015 Anna Tcybuleva
2012 Federico Colli ( Louis Schwizgebel 2nd )
2009 Sofya Gulyak
2006 Sunwook Kim
2003 Antti Siirala
2000 Alessio Bax ( Severin von Eckardstein 3rd )
1996 Ilya Itan
1993 Ricardo Castro ( Leon McCawley 2nd )
1990 Artur Pizarro ( Lars Vogt 2nd , Eric Le Sage 3rd )
1987 Vladimir Ovchinnikov ( Noriko Ogawa 3rd , Boris Berezovsky 4th )
1984 Jon Kimura Parker
1981 Ian Hobson
1978 Michael Dalberto
1975 Dimitri Alexeev ( Mitsuko Uchida 2nd , Andras Schiff 3rd )
1972 Murray Persia
1969 Radu Lupu ( Georges Pludermacher 2nd, Arthur Moreira Lima 3rd )
1966 Rafael Orozco
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leeds_International_Piano_Competition
Not since 1990. Not to mention it has produced turds like Perrahia.

dk
Herman
2015-11-01 20:09:28 UTC
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Post by dk
Not since 1990. Not to mention it has produced turds like Perrahia.
dk
for chrissakes, get some perspective.
AB
2015-11-01 21:47:59 UTC
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Post by Herman
Post by dk
Not since 1990. Not to mention it has produced turds like Perrahia.
dk
for chrissakes, get some perspective.
Perrahia is no big deal.... just an ordinary pianist.

AB
JohnGavin
2015-11-01 22:02:55 UTC
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It occasionally occurs to me that the long-standing, overly negative pianophiles here are basically an unhappy group of people.

For dramatic contrast to this, watch one of the interviews with Mr. Cho on YouTube and observe the genuine humility he exhibits. It's highly refreshing.
Tony
2015-11-01 22:31:18 UTC
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Post by JohnGavin
It occasionally occurs to me that the long-standing, overly negative pianophiles here are basically an unhappy group of people.
For dramatic contrast to this, watch one of the interviews with Mr. Cho on YouTube and observe the genuine humility he exhibits. It's highly refreshing.
It is refreshing, but frankly nearly all the competitors at the competition expressed the same humility.

By the way, you might have it backwards as to who's happy. You reminded me of this Dylan Moran skit about potential, particularly the bit about footballers and those who watch them


Bozo
2015-11-01 22:44:14 UTC
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... It's highly refreshing.
Were only his playing so.

But then , he's hardly unique among recent competition winners.
AB
2015-11-01 23:08:50 UTC
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Post by JohnGavin
It occasionally occurs to me that the long-standing, overly negative pianophiles here are basically an unhappy group of people.
For dramatic contrast to this, watch one of the interviews with Mr. Cho on YouTube and observe the genuine humility he exhibits. It's highly refreshing.
we are unhappy when we are TOLD that we 'are unhappy'........ speak for yourself John

AB
dk
2015-11-02 02:27:12 UTC
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Post by AB
Post by Herman
Post by dk
Not since 1990. Not to mention it has produced turds like Perrahia.
for chrissakes, get some perspective.
Perrahia is no big deal.... just an ordinary pianist.
except worse

dk
Bozo
2015-11-01 21:04:33 UTC
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Post by dk
Not since 1990. Not to mention it has produced turds like Perrahia.
With all due respect, since 1990, Bax, von Eckardstein , Colli, and Schwizgebel are well worth hearing and following, not to say others are not.

I still recall my excitement upon hearing Perahia's debut Columbia lp of Schumann, thinking here was the heir to Rubinstein.
Al Eisner
2015-11-02 22:34:57 UTC
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Post by dk
Post by Bozo
2015 Anna Tcybuleva
2012 Federico Colli ( Louis Schwizgebel 2nd )
2009 Sofya Gulyak
2006 Sunwook Kim
2003 Antti Siirala
2000 Alessio Bax ( Severin von Eckardstein 3rd )
1996 Ilya Itan
1993 Ricardo Castro ( Leon McCawley 2nd )
1990 Artur Pizarro ( Lars Vogt 2nd , Eric Le Sage 3rd )
1987 Vladimir Ovchinnikov ( Noriko Ogawa 3rd , Boris Berezovsky 4th )
1984 Jon Kimura Parker
1981 Ian Hobson
1978 Michael Dalberto
1975 Dimitri Alexeev ( Mitsuko Uchida 2nd , Andras Schiff 3rd )
1972 Murray Persia
1969 Radu Lupu ( Georges Pludermacher 2nd, Arthur Moreira Lima 3rd )
1966 Rafael Orozco
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leeds_International_Piano_Competition
Not since 1990. Not to mention it has produced turds like Perrahia.
From what I've heard (largely in concert), Alessio Bax is quite a fine
pianist.
--
Al Eisner
Bozo
2015-11-03 00:40:00 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
From what I've heard (largely in concert), Alessio Bax is quite a fine
pianist.
Agreed, as I noted in my post here of Nov.1 ; as well as others from Leeds.
Al Eisner
2015-10-28 20:53:30 UTC
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Post by laraine
Post by HT
Post by dk
I like YES much more than Cho, to the extent a
comparison can be made based on different works.
And I like HJ Lim much better than both in both
works!
Schumann isn't Cho's cup of tea - at lest not at that age. He's a (self-declared) Chopinist, and I tend to agree with him. He should continue playing Chopin.
Henk
I actually got the impression (no pun intended) that he was a
Ravelist, but his Schumann Humoresque and some of his Chopin
seemed very good. Maybe he'll now have the chance to record
some of the Ravel that he played at competitions.
Has he perhaps stopped playing Ravel? Would that mean that he
is unRaveling? (intended) Hopefully he hasn't begun to LIszt.

(ducking)
--
Al Eisner
laraine
2015-10-28 23:17:39 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
Post by laraine
Post by HT
Post by dk
I like YES much more than Cho, to the extent a
comparison can be made based on different works.
And I like HJ Lim much better than both in both
works!
Schumann isn't Cho's cup of tea - at lest not at that age. He's a (self-declared) Chopinist, and I tend to agree with him. He should continue playing Chopin.
Henk
I actually got the impression (no pun intended) that he was a
Ravelist, but his Schumann Humoresque and some of his Chopin
seemed very good. Maybe he'll now have the chance to record
some of the Ravel that he played at competitions.
Has he perhaps stopped playing Ravel? Would that mean that he
is unRaveling? (intended) Hopefully he hasn't begun to LIszt.
(ducking)
--
Al Eisner
Sounds like some of his revelling rivals
more than him...

But seriously, it really would be a shame
if he didn't record Ravel --it was that good.

C.
Bozo
2017-08-11 21:02:44 UTC
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I hear in his playing an uncommon mastery of inner voicing, and wonderful >sensitivity and poise.
Cho at 2017 Edinburgh Festival. I heard only the Op.109, evidencing the qualities you noted .

Beethoven: Piano Sonata in C minor, Op.13, 'Pathétique'
Beethoven: Piano Sonata in E, Op.109
Pause
Chopin: Ballades - complete

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0902zcx
AB
2017-08-13 19:21:13 UTC
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Post by Bozo
I hear in his playing an uncommon mastery of inner voicing, and wonderful >sensitivity and poise.
Cho at 2017 Edinburgh Festival. I heard only the Op.109, evidencing the qualities you noted .
Beethoven: Piano Sonata in C minor, Op.13, 'Pathétique'
Beethoven: Piano Sonata in E, Op.109
Pause
Chopin: Ballades - complete
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0902zcx
yes, he has complete command of the piano. some really beautiful moments (phrasing). However, at times he is much too fussy, destroying the flow of the music. In spite of his huge technique, there is little 'sweep' or virtuosity in his playing. Also, at time he plays too 'big' for the LvB sonatas as if they are Emperor concertos.
One thing I so admire about Volodos is his restraint in less dramatic moments and saves the powerful stuff when it really matters

AB

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