Discussion:
Pieces you can't listen to
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Tatonik
2017-07-24 19:20:00 UTC
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There are some piece I don't listen to because I'm tired of them, but
there are others I simply can't listen to because of the associations
they carry. When I was a student, the music director asked me to play
the keyboard part in the Bach's Brandenburg Concerto No. 4. I balked
because I'm not so good on the piano when I play with others (and not so
good, period), but in the end I reluctantly agreed. The part was
probably a bit above my skill level and I didn't practice enough.
During the performance all I could do was selectively drop the right
hand and try to keep up with the left. All in all, I made a hash of it.
The one saving grace is that for the most part, it was hard to hear me
over the other instruments.

When I attended the next end-of-semester concert as an audience member,
I was surprised to see that the very same Brandenburg Concerto was on
the program, with the same personnel, save one: I had been replaced.
The music director and I never spoke of it, and he never asked me for
the score back, even though it was the original, not a photocopy. Nor
did I return it of my own accord. Returning it would have been, as they
say in universities these days, an emotional trigger, and I just wasn't
up to it.

I have a commercial recording of the Brandenburg Concerti that's pretty
good - The Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra under Ton Koopman - but I just
can't listen to No. 4 anymore. It makes me feel queasy.

A part-time lecturer in the music department once told me a story about
her roommate. This roommate would practice Brahms' Rhapsody in B Minor
on the piano endlessly, and every time she came to this one dramatic
part, she would screw it up really badly and yell "FUCK!" in
frustration. Then she would start from the beginning and do the whole
thing again. This went on for several months. Ever since that time,
whenever the lecturer was within earshot of the Brahms Rhapsody and that
difficult part came up, in her mind's ear she heard her roommate yelling
"FUCK!"

She said she can't listen to that piece anymore.
Andy Evans
2017-07-24 19:33:29 UTC
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There's nothing like a total screw-up for putting you off a piece of music forever....

For me it was "Heidenröslein" by Franz Schubert for a school competition. A bit like this but a hundred times worse:



I think the comment was "The less said about that the better"....
Arno Schuh
2017-07-25 09:20:12 UTC
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Pieces you can't listen to ... without thinking about something else.

Thaht's not a reply to the request, but something similar.

After listening to Gerard Hoffnung's concertos, Spike Jones , Victor Borge
etc. I can't listen to the so butchered concertos, pieces etc. without
thinking about the funny additions they made.

I can't get it out of my head, and so, when I listen to the
Schumann/Grieg/Tschaikovsky piano concerto, when I listen to the Beethoven,
Haydn Chopin pieces they murdered ... it is there, and I can't get it out of
my brain.



Arno
Neil
2017-07-25 11:06:04 UTC
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Post by Tatonik
There are some piece I don't listen to because I'm tired of them, but
there are others I simply can't listen to because of the associations
they carry.
Emperor concerto. Never liked it except slow movement. Totally confounded by the adulation it gets.

Appassionata.

Rachmaninov 2nd concerto.

Schumann concerto

Almost maxed out on Bach B minor mass because I've listened to it too many times.

(just call me Glenn!!)
Bozo
2017-07-25 12:12:59 UTC
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Tchaikovsky's 4th and 6th Symphonies, "Nutcracker

Beethoven's 6th Symphony

Mahler's 7th Symphony
m***@gmail.com
2017-07-25 14:16:50 UTC
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Taking it to the next level, what does it mean when something you disliked your whole life suddenly starts to sound different- better, even? I can't help but take it as a marker of mental decline- the snoring, loss of sleep and cerebral atrophy catching up to me. Two examples: 1) Vivaldi. I've accepted there's very little music there, but now see a vital imagination about how to create energy. Suddenly, he seems unique. 2) The opening of Tchaikovsky's 4th. Or the whole first movement. I always found it crass, blatant and clumsy. Now I'm sensing it, to my own disbelief, as richly textured and uncompromising.

Outrageously bad music blunts the mind's ability to imagine anything better. Khatchaturian's third symphony comes to mind.
Andy Evans
2017-07-25 14:49:03 UTC
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Taking it to the next level, what does it mean when something you disliked your whole life suddenly starts to sound different - better, even?>
The day Pachelbel's Canon starts sounding better will be the day when I'm certifiably insane....
Frank Berger
2017-07-25 18:37:22 UTC
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Post by Andy Evans
Taking it to the next level, what does it mean when something you disliked your whole life suddenly starts to sound different - better, even?>
The day Pachelbel's Canon starts sounding better will be the day when I'm certifiably insane....
I spent most of my life disliking chocolate. In my 60s I
gradually started liking it and appreciating what all the
fuss is about.
m***@gmail.com
2017-07-25 18:46:12 UTC
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About chocolate, I saw an interesting "Nova" that talked about out a genetic marker that predicted with near-perfect accuracy whether children liked certain classes of vegetables. Those with the marker would taste certain vegetables as being bitter. The few that lacked the marker liked their broccoli, cabbage, and so forth, just fine. What they haven't figured out is how this taste changes (and how the bitter disappears) as we age.
Frank Berger
2017-07-25 19:02:24 UTC
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Post by m***@gmail.com
About chocolate, I saw an interesting "Nova" that talked about out a genetic marker that predicted with near-perfect accuracy whether children liked certain classes of vegetables. Those with the marker would taste certain vegetables as being bitter. The few that lacked the marker liked their broccoli, cabbage, and so forth, just fine. What they haven't figured out is how this taste changes (and how the bitter disappears) as we age.
I've been called a mutant before. I have a couple of other
quirks. I am extremely sensitive to the smell of rancidity.
I can often smell it in packaged foods when no one else
can. One other odd thing: if I tickle the inside of my
right elbow, I get an intense itch on the right side of my
tongue and in my lip. Doesn't work on the other side and no
doctor I've ever mentioned it to has ever heard of anything
like it.
m***@gmail.com
2017-07-26 17:42:12 UTC
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Post by Frank Berger
if I tickle the inside of my
right elbow, I get an intense itch on the right side of my
tongue and in my lip. Doesn't work on the other side and no
doctor I've ever mentioned it to has ever heard of anything
like it.
Oliver Sacks (and I'm sure others in other places) has written in several of his books and more than one article about how sensory mapping in the brain parks receptors for different areas of the body next to each other, and how sometimes there is traffic between them. Here's the first one I found in Google, though this discussion appears to center on research on animals. The same general observations were true with humans:
http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2009/05/11/brain-games
One of the books of his I read offered accounts of people who had lost limbs and found other areas of the body gain in sensation. This also indirectly explained what motivates foot fetishists, as the sensors for feet are parked adjacent to the sensors for, well, take a guess.

In any case, your wiring issue may be novel, but it is hardly farfetched.
Andy Evans
2017-07-28 07:38:19 UTC
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Post by m***@gmail.com
In any case, your wiring issue may be novel, but it is hardly farfetched.
A pal of mine who is a dentist had a patient who used to receive a pop station on one of his fillings. He asked if it could be changed to a classical station....
Lawrence Kart
2017-07-28 16:09:42 UTC
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Post by Andy Evans
Post by m***@gmail.com
In any case, your wiring issue may be novel, but it is hardly farfetched.
A pal of mine who is a dentist had a patient who used to receive a pop station on one of his fillings. He asked if it could be changed to a classical station....
Just about anything by Schnittke.

Larry Kart
HT
2017-07-28 19:25:45 UTC
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Post by Lawrence Kart
Just about anything by Schnittke.
Just about anything for piano by Rachmaninoff.

Henk
Bozo
2017-07-25 21:37:37 UTC
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Post by Frank Berger
I spent most of my life disliking chocolate. In my 60s I
gradually started liking it and appreciating what all the
fuss is about.
I started liking cheap cabernet in my late teens ; thankfully my tastes have not changed.
Frank Berger
2017-07-25 21:46:26 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Post by Frank Berger
I spent most of my life disliking chocolate. In my 60s I
gradually started liking it and appreciating what all the
fuss is about.
I started liking cheap cabernet in my late teens ; thankfully my tastes have not changed.
LOL
dk
2017-08-12 17:09:23 UTC
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Post by Frank Berger
I spent most of my life disliking chocolate. In my 60s I
gradually started liking it and appreciating what all the
fuss is about.
I started liking cheap cabernet in my late teens;
thankfully my tastes have not changed.
Cheap port provides better value for money! ;-)

dk
Bob Harper
2017-08-11 12:59:57 UTC
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I have a friend who insists that the sound of any music by Hans Pfitzner
sucks all the oxygen out of the room. I used to threaten him with a gift
of the Kubelik recording of 'Palestrina':) He always shuddered at the
suggestion. It became a running joke between us.

Bob Harper
Lawrence Kart
2017-08-11 14:26:20 UTC
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Post by Bob Harper
I have a friend who insists that the sound of any music by Hans Pfitzner
sucks all the oxygen out of the room. I used to threaten him with a gift
of the Kubelik recording of 'Palestrina':) He always shuddered at the
suggestion. It became a running joke between us.
Bob Harper
OTOH, I have over the years developed an affection for the music of the composer who's widely regarded as the Number One turnoff, Max Reger.

Larry Kart
JohnGavin
2017-08-11 19:23:41 UTC
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Rhapsody in Blue
h***@gmail.com
2017-08-12 02:01:38 UTC
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Post by JohnGavin
Rhapsody in Blue
Sorcerer's Apprentice
Bolero

HV
Bozo
2017-08-12 02:02:55 UTC
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Post by JohnGavin
Rhapsody in Blue
Sergio Fiorentino agreed with you :

( At 4:38 in )
Bozo
2017-08-12 02:08:30 UTC
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OTOH, I have over the years developed an affection for the music of the composer who's widely regarded >as the Number One turnoff, Max Reger.
FWW, I enjoy this CPO cd of earlier solo piano works of Reger :

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00E9CGB4O/ref=dm_ws_sp_ps_dp
Andy Evans
2017-08-12 15:07:25 UTC
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I always wondered why Richter could never play La Fille aux Cheveux de Lin or Minstrels from Debussy's Preludes. La Fille aux Cheveux de Lin is fairly inoffensive - maybe Richter thought it bland.

But Minstrels....? I really think Richter didn't "get" it. Of course we don't know, but he was never much on jazz, ragtime or blues that I'm aware of. I listened to a bunch of other famous names and they don't get it either. Some are totally off the mark, some are OK but just too fast and play it too straight - Rubinstein, Jacobs, Cortot. It's marked "modere".

But this is more like ragtime, which emerges in a few of Debussy's other works. Samson Francois is pretty good - he used to frequent late night Paris jazz spots. He has some feel for it. Gulda also - another jazzer. Godowsky is alright - on YT. Gieseking and Fazil Say are alright too, but neither are close to jazz.

Here's a totally no-name pianist who plays it with a nice jazz feel - it makes sense! Keeps the beat and swings.


And here's a hip-hop arrangement even - shows you can play it in time....

n***@gmail.com
2017-07-26 17:34:42 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Tchaikovsky's 4th and 6th Symphonies, "Nutcracker
Beethoven's 6th Symphony
Mahler's 7th Symphony
AFAIAC any of those are a lot easier for listening than is K.525 (Serenade in G Major or Eine kleine Nachtmusik). Its recording (Sony) by the Budapest String Quartet + James Levine is the most tolerable of those to which I've listened.
n***@gmail.com
2017-07-26 17:37:52 UTC
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Post by Neil
Post by Tatonik
There are some piece I don't listen to because I'm tired of them, but
there are others I simply can't listen to because of the associations
they carry.
Emperor concerto. Never liked it except slow movement. Totally confounded by the adulation it gets.
Appassionata.
Rachmaninov 2nd concerto.
Schumann concerto
Almost maxed out on Bach B minor mass because I've listened to it too many times.
(just call me Glenn!!)
Might that be 'Glen or Glenda'?
Terry
2017-07-25 15:49:48 UTC
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Post by Tatonik
There are some piece I don't listen to because I'm tired of them, but
there are others I simply can't listen to because of the associations
they carry. When I was a student, the music director asked me to play
the keyboard part in the Bach's Brandenburg Concerto No. 4. I balked
because I'm not so good on the piano when I play with others (and not so
good, period), but in the end I reluctantly agreed. The part was
probably a bit above my skill level and I didn't practice enough.
During the performance all I could do was selectively drop the right
hand and try to keep up with the left. All in all, I made a hash of it.
The one saving grace is that for the most part, it was hard to hear me
over the other instruments.
When I attended the next end-of-semester concert as an audience member,
I was surprised to see that the very same Brandenburg Concerto was on
the program, with the same personnel, save one: I had been replaced.
The music director and I never spoke of it, and he never asked me for
the score back, even though it was the original, not a photocopy. Nor
did I return it of my own accord. Returning it would have been, as they
say in universities these days, an emotional trigger, and I just wasn't
up to it.
I have a commercial recording of the Brandenburg Concerti that's pretty
good - The Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra under Ton Koopman - but I just
can't listen to No. 4 anymore. It makes me feel queasy.
A part-time lecturer in the music department once told me a story about
her roommate. This roommate would practice Brahms' Rhapsody in B Minor
on the piano endlessly, and every time she came to this one dramatic
part, she would screw it up really badly and yell "FUCK!" in
frustration. Then she would start from the beginning and do the whole
thing again. This went on for several months. Ever since that time,
whenever the lecturer was within earshot of the Brahms Rhapsody and that
difficult part came up, in her mind's ear she heard her roommate yelling
"FUCK!"
She said she can't listen to that piece anymore.
I cannot stand the compositions of Astor Piazzola. They make me squirm.
Andy Evans
2017-07-25 16:43:52 UTC
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Post by Terry
I cannot stand the compositions of Astor Piazzola. They make me squirm.
Not a fan either. But I can't even listen to Mozart. That's pretty serious. Really gets on my nerves.
laraine
2017-07-26 00:33:35 UTC
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Anytime I hear a well-known Chopin piece, I think
'Oh no, I've heard that a trillion times...'
but if it's very well-played, I still enjoy it.
to my surprise.

Perhaps one gets a second wind in listening.
It does help to focus on the details as well
as on one's emotional reactions.

C.
HT
2017-07-28 19:24:21 UTC
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Post by laraine
Anytime I hear a well-known Chopin piece, I think
'Oh no, I've heard that a trillion times...'
but if it's very well-played, I still enjoy it.
to my surprise.
There is one exception, for me: the Preludes.

Henk
Tony
2017-07-28 20:41:27 UTC
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Most Brahms.
Lawrence Chalmers
2017-08-12 16:27:04 UTC
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Post by Tatonik
There are some piece I don't listen to because I'm tired of them, but
there are others I simply can't listen to because of the associations
they carry. When I was a student, the music director asked me to play
the keyboard part in the Bach's Brandenburg Concerto No. 4. I balked
because I'm not so good on the piano when I play with others (and not so
good, period), but in the end I reluctantly agreed. The part was
probably a bit above my skill level and I didn't practice enough.
During the performance all I could do was selectively drop the right
hand and try to keep up with the left. All in all, I made a hash of it.
The one saving grace is that for the most part, it was hard to hear me
over the other instruments.
I can't say why, but numerous efforts to listen to Carter's String quartets
have proved futile for me. I keep them on hand for later attempts, however
I hesitate to say I "can't stand" them.
Post by Tatonik
When I attended the next end-of-semester concert as an audience member,
I was surprised to see that the very same Brandenburg Concerto was on
the program, with the same personnel, save one: I had been replaced.
The music director and I never spoke of it, and he never asked me for
the score back, even though it was the original, not a photocopy. Nor
did I return it of my own accord. Returning it would have been, as they
say in universities these days, an emotional trigger, and I just wasn't
up to it.
I have a commercial recording of the Brandenburg Concerti that's pretty
good - The Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra under Ton Koopman - but I just
can't listen to No. 4 anymore. It makes me feel queasy.
A part-time lecturer in the music department once told me a story about
her roommate. This roommate would practice Brahms' Rhapsody in B Minor
on the piano endlessly, and every time she came to this one dramatic
part, she would screw it up really badly and yell "FUCK!" in
frustration. Then she would start from the beginning and do the whole
thing again. This went on for several months. Ever since that time,
whenever the lecturer was within earshot of the Brahms Rhapsody and that
difficult part came up, in her mind's ear she heard her roommate yelling
"FUCK!"
She said she can't listen to that piece anymore.
Raymond Hall
2017-08-13 07:23:38 UTC
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Post by Tatonik
There are some piece I don't listen to because I'm tired of them, but
there are others I simply can't listen to because of the associations
they carry. When I was a student, the music director asked me to play
the keyboard part in the Bach's Brandenburg Concerto No. 4. I balked
because I'm not so good on the piano when I play with others (and not so
good, period), but in the end I reluctantly agreed. The part was
probably a bit above my skill level and I didn't practice enough.
During the performance all I could do was selectively drop the right
hand and try to keep up with the left. All in all, I made a hash of it.
The one saving grace is that for the most part, it was hard to hear me
over the other instruments.
When I attended the next end-of-semester concert as an audience member,
I was surprised to see that the very same Brandenburg Concerto was on
the program, with the same personnel, save one: I had been replaced.
The music director and I never spoke of it, and he never asked me for
the score back, even though it was the original, not a photocopy. Nor
did I return it of my own accord. Returning it would have been, as they
say in universities these days, an emotional trigger, and I just wasn't
up to it.
I have a commercial recording of the Brandenburg Concerti that's pretty
good - The Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra under Ton Koopman - but I just
can't listen to No. 4 anymore. It makes me feel queasy.
A part-time lecturer in the music department once told me a story about
her roommate. This roommate would practice Brahms' Rhapsody in B Minor
on the piano endlessly, and every time she came to this one dramatic
part, she would screw it up really badly and yell "FUCK!" in
frustration. Then she would start from the beginning and do the whole
thing again. This went on for several months. Ever since that time,
whenever the lecturer was within earshot of the Brahms Rhapsody and that
difficult part came up, in her mind's ear she heard her roommate yelling
"FUCK!"
She said she can't listen to that piece anymore.
I believed for a long time that I would never listen to Rimsky's Scheherezade again. Wrong !! After listening to Schwarz/Seattle recently, with the three Tsar Saltan pieces, I've fallen in love again. Magical, nostalgic stuff. Can't get enough of the Rimsky now. Gergiev has done the operas but I've read mixed reviews.

If I hate a piece, it is because I generally dislike the composer. Respighi, Berlioz, I now avoid whereas once I didn't, and in addition there is hardly any Chopin that really grabs me.

Ray Hall, Taree
Al Eisner
2017-08-15 20:24:21 UTC
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Post by Raymond Hall
Post by Tatonik
There are some piece I don't listen to because I'm tired of them, but
there are others I simply can't listen to because of the associations
they carry. When I was a student, the music director asked me to play
the keyboard part in the Bach's Brandenburg Concerto No. 4. I balked
because I'm not so good on the piano when I play with others (and not so
good, period), but in the end I reluctantly agreed. The part was
probably a bit above my skill level and I didn't practice enough.
During the performance all I could do was selectively drop the right
hand and try to keep up with the left. All in all, I made a hash of it.
The one saving grace is that for the most part, it was hard to hear me
over the other instruments.
When I attended the next end-of-semester concert as an audience member,
I was surprised to see that the very same Brandenburg Concerto was on
the program, with the same personnel, save one: I had been replaced.
The music director and I never spoke of it, and he never asked me for
the score back, even though it was the original, not a photocopy. Nor
did I return it of my own accord. Returning it would have been, as they
say in universities these days, an emotional trigger, and I just wasn't
up to it.
I have a commercial recording of the Brandenburg Concerti that's pretty
good - The Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra under Ton Koopman - but I just
can't listen to No. 4 anymore. It makes me feel queasy.
A part-time lecturer in the music department once told me a story about
her roommate. This roommate would practice Brahms' Rhapsody in B Minor
on the piano endlessly, and every time she came to this one dramatic
part, she would screw it up really badly and yell "FUCK!" in
frustration. Then she would start from the beginning and do the whole
thing again. This went on for several months. Ever since that time,
whenever the lecturer was within earshot of the Brahms Rhapsody and that
difficult part came up, in her mind's ear she heard her roommate yelling
"FUCK!"
She said she can't listen to that piece anymore.
I believed for a long time that I would never listen to Rimsky's Scheherezade again. Wrong !! After listening to Schwarz/Seattle recently, with the three Tsar Saltan pieces, I've fallen in love again. Magical, nostalgic stuff. Can't get enough of the Rimsky now. Gergiev has done the operas but I've read mixed reviews.
If I hate a piece, it is because I generally dislike the composer. Respighi, Berlioz, I now avoid whereas once I didn't, and in addition there is hardly any Chopin that really grabs me.
Ray Hall, Taree
Most responses in this thread have focused on pieces one has gotten (at
least temporarily) tired of, or pieces (or composers) one simply does
not like or does not understand. :Most folks have lots of those. But
I thought the original premise of the thread (see first sentence of
OP above) was potentially more interesting and different.

I'm afraid I don't have a direct personal experience to relate.
But somewhat in that light: I've been largely unable to listen to
Ponchielli's "Dance of the Hours" since I heard Allan Sherman's
1960's song which used it. Chabrier's España has been nearly as
much of a problem, at least until recently. It has not to do with
the usage in a popular song, but more with the nature of that song
and how it is used.

Al Eisner
O
2017-08-15 21:11:06 UTC
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In article
Post by Al Eisner
Most responses in this thread have focused on pieces one has gotten (at
least temporarily) tired of, or pieces (or composers) one simply does
not like or does not understand. :Most folks have lots of those. But
I thought the original premise of the thread (see first sentence of
OP above) was potentially more interesting and different.
I'm afraid I don't have a direct personal experience to relate.
But somewhat in that light: I've been largely unable to listen to
Ponchielli's "Dance of the Hours" since I heard Allan Sherman's
1960's song which used it. Chabrier's España has been nearly as
much of a problem, at least until recently. It has not to do with
the usage in a popular song, but more with the nature of that song
and how it is used.
Not quite in your original premise, but the "Poet and Peasant Overture"
has survived manglings by Popeye, Bluto, and Spike Jones (if not
others), and still Paul Paray and the Detroit makes it sparkle on
records. (Although when I played it 4 hands with my son, he always
added the additional "tum-tum" that Spike Jones added, and sometimes
the obbligato Popeye tune).

-Owen
Bob Harper
2017-08-15 21:15:19 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
Post by Raymond Hall
Post by Tatonik
There are some piece I don't listen to because I'm tired of them, but
there are others I simply can't listen to because of the associations
they carry. When I was a student, the music director asked me to play
the keyboard part in the Bach's Brandenburg Concerto No. 4. I balked
because I'm not so good on the piano when I play with others (and not so
good, period), but in the end I reluctantly agreed. The part was
probably a bit above my skill level and I didn't practice enough.
During the performance all I could do was selectively drop the right
hand and try to keep up with the left. All in all, I made a hash of it.
The one saving grace is that for the most part, it was hard to hear me
over the other instruments.
When I attended the next end-of-semester concert as an audience member,
I was surprised to see that the very same Brandenburg Concerto was on
the program, with the same personnel, save one: I had been replaced.
The music director and I never spoke of it, and he never asked me for
the score back, even though it was the original, not a photocopy. Nor
did I return it of my own accord. Returning it would have been, as they
say in universities these days, an emotional trigger, and I just wasn't
up to it.
I have a commercial recording of the Brandenburg Concerti that's pretty
good - The Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra under Ton Koopman - but I just
can't listen to No. 4 anymore. It makes me feel queasy.
A part-time lecturer in the music department once told me a story about
her roommate. This roommate would practice Brahms' Rhapsody in B Minor
on the piano endlessly, and every time she came to this one dramatic
part, she would screw it up really badly and yell "FUCK!" in
frustration. Then she would start from the beginning and do the whole
thing again. This went on for several months. Ever since that time,
whenever the lecturer was within earshot of the Brahms Rhapsody and that
difficult part came up, in her mind's ear she heard her roommate yelling
"FUCK!"
She said she can't listen to that piece anymore.
I believed for a long time that I would never listen to Rimsky's
Scheherezade again. Wrong !! After listening to Schwarz/Seattle
recently, with the three Tsar Saltan pieces, I've fallen in love
again. Magical, nostalgic stuff. Can't get enough of the Rimsky now.
Gergiev has done the operas but I've read mixed reviews.
If I hate a piece, it is because I generally dislike the composer.
Respighi, Berlioz, I now avoid whereas once I didn't, and in addition
there is hardly any Chopin that really grabs me.
Ray Hall, Taree
Most responses in this thread have focused on pieces one has gotten (at
least temporarily) tired of, or pieces (or composers) one simply does
not like or does not understand. :Most folks have lots of those. But
I thought the original premise of the thread (see first sentence of
OP above) was potentially more interesting and different.
I'm afraid I don't have a direct personal experience to relate.
But somewhat in that light: I've been largely unable to listen to
Ponchielli's "Dance of the Hours" since I heard Allan Sherman's
1960's song which used it. Chabrier's España has been nearly as
much of a problem, at least until recently. It has not to do with
the usage in a popular song, but more with the nature of that song
and how it is used.
Al Eisner
But Al, "Hello Muddah, hello Faddah" is such a perfect novelty song. How
can anyone diss it? :)

Bob Harper
Al Eisner
2017-08-15 21:28:31 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Al Eisner
Post by Raymond Hall
Post by Tatonik
There are some piece I don't listen to because I'm tired of them, but
there are others I simply can't listen to because of the associations
they carry. When I was a student, the music director asked me to play
the keyboard part in the Bach's Brandenburg Concerto No. 4. I balked
because I'm not so good on the piano when I play with others (and not so
good, period), but in the end I reluctantly agreed. The part was
probably a bit above my skill level and I didn't practice enough.
During the performance all I could do was selectively drop the right
hand and try to keep up with the left. All in all, I made a hash of it.
The one saving grace is that for the most part, it was hard to hear me
over the other instruments.
When I attended the next end-of-semester concert as an audience member,
I was surprised to see that the very same Brandenburg Concerto was on
the program, with the same personnel, save one: I had been replaced.
The music director and I never spoke of it, and he never asked me for
the score back, even though it was the original, not a photocopy. Nor
did I return it of my own accord. Returning it would have been, as they
say in universities these days, an emotional trigger, and I just wasn't
up to it.
I have a commercial recording of the Brandenburg Concerti that's pretty
good - The Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra under Ton Koopman - but I just
can't listen to No. 4 anymore. It makes me feel queasy.
A part-time lecturer in the music department once told me a story about
her roommate. This roommate would practice Brahms' Rhapsody in B Minor
on the piano endlessly, and every time she came to this one dramatic
part, she would screw it up really badly and yell "FUCK!" in
frustration. Then she would start from the beginning and do the whole
thing again. This went on for several months. Ever since that time,
whenever the lecturer was within earshot of the Brahms Rhapsody and that
difficult part came up, in her mind's ear she heard her roommate yelling
"FUCK!"
She said she can't listen to that piece anymore.
I believed for a long time that I would never listen to Rimsky's
Scheherezade again. Wrong !! After listening to Schwarz/Seattle recently,
with the three Tsar Saltan pieces, I've fallen in love again. Magical,
nostalgic stuff. Can't get enough of the Rimsky now. Gergiev has done the
operas but I've read mixed reviews.
If I hate a piece, it is because I generally dislike the composer.
Respighi, Berlioz, I now avoid whereas once I didn't, and in addition
there is hardly any Chopin that really grabs me.
Ray Hall, Taree
Most responses in this thread have focused on pieces one has gotten (at
least temporarily) tired of, or pieces (or composers) one simply does
not like or does not understand. :Most folks have lots of those. But
I thought the original premise of the thread (see first sentence of
OP above) was potentially more interesting and different.
I'm afraid I don't have a direct personal experience to relate.
But somewhat in that light: I've been largely unable to listen to
Ponchielli's "Dance of the Hours" since I heard Allan Sherman's
1960's song which used it. Chabrier's España has been nearly as
much of a problem, at least until recently. It has not to do with
the usage in a popular song, but more with the nature of that song
and how it is used.
Al Eisner
But Al, "Hello Muddah, hello Faddah" is such a perfect novelty song. How can
anyone diss it? :)
Bob Harper
I guess it's so memorable that I can't hear the original without thinking
of it, which somewhat spoils the experience. :)
--
Al Eisner
Matthew Silverstein
2017-08-16 01:06:25 UTC
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Post by Al Eisner
I guess it's so memorable that I can't hear the original without thinking
of it, which somewhat spoils the experience. :)
When I hear it, I immediately imagine dancing hippos . . .

Matty
YM ​יוֹשִׁיוּכִּי
2017-08-16 02:34:47 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Incidentally, why Dan Koren betrayed me?
I can understand most others, but I have no idea for Koren.

YM
O
2017-08-16 15:19:45 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by YM ​יוֹשִׁיוּכִּי
Incidentally, why Dan Koren betrayed me?
I can understand most others, but I have no idea for Koren.
You always hurt the one you love.

-Owen
m***@cloud9.net
2017-08-16 15:35:12 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tatonik
There are some piece I don't listen to because I'm tired of them, but
there are others I simply can't listen to because of the associations
they carry. When I was a student, the music director asked me to play
the keyboard part in the Bach's Brandenburg Concerto No. 4. I balked
because I'm not so good on the piano when I play with others (and not so
good, period), but in the end I reluctantly agreed. The part was
probably a bit above my skill level and I didn't practice enough.
During the performance all I could do was selectively drop the right
hand and try to keep up with the left. All in all, I made a hash of it.
The one saving grace is that for the most part, it was hard to hear me
over the other instruments.
When I attended the next end-of-semester concert as an audience member,
I was surprised to see that the very same Brandenburg Concerto was on
the program, with the same personnel, save one: I had been replaced.
The music director and I never spoke of it, and he never asked me for
the score back, even though it was the original, not a photocopy. Nor
did I return it of my own accord. Returning it would have been, as they
say in universities these days, an emotional trigger, and I just wasn't
up to it.
I have a commercial recording of the Brandenburg Concerti that's pretty
good - The Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra under Ton Koopman - but I just
can't listen to No. 4 anymore. It makes me feel queasy.
A part-time lecturer in the music department once told me a story about
her roommate. This roommate would practice Brahms' Rhapsody in B Minor
on the piano endlessly, and every time she came to this one dramatic
part, she would screw it up really badly and yell "FUCK!" in
frustration. Then she would start from the beginning and do the whole
thing again. This went on for several months. Ever since that time,
whenever the lecturer was within earshot of the Brahms Rhapsody and that
difficult part came up, in her mind's ear she heard her roommate yelling
"FUCK!"
She said she can't listen to that piece anymore.
My late wife's favorite song was Gershwins' Love Walked In, and some of the lyrics played a major role in our first romantic encounter. Since her passing 6 years ago, I haven't played any recording of that song. When I inadvertently hear it elsewhere, I instantly get tears in my eyes.

Mort Linder
Frank Berger
2017-08-16 15:43:29 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by m***@cloud9.net
Post by Tatonik
There are some piece I don't listen to because I'm tired of them, but
there are others I simply can't listen to because of the associations
they carry. When I was a student, the music director asked me to play
the keyboard part in the Bach's Brandenburg Concerto No. 4. I balked
because I'm not so good on the piano when I play with others (and not so
good, period), but in the end I reluctantly agreed. The part was
probably a bit above my skill level and I didn't practice enough.
During the performance all I could do was selectively drop the right
hand and try to keep up with the left. All in all, I made a hash of it.
The one saving grace is that for the most part, it was hard to hear me
over the other instruments.
When I attended the next end-of-semester concert as an audience member,
I was surprised to see that the very same Brandenburg Concerto was on
the program, with the same personnel, save one: I had been replaced.
The music director and I never spoke of it, and he never asked me for
the score back, even though it was the original, not a photocopy. Nor
did I return it of my own accord. Returning it would have been, as they
say in universities these days, an emotional trigger, and I just wasn't
up to it.
I have a commercial recording of the Brandenburg Concerti that's pretty
good - The Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra under Ton Koopman - but I just
can't listen to No. 4 anymore. It makes me feel queasy.
A part-time lecturer in the music department once told me a story about
her roommate. This roommate would practice Brahms' Rhapsody in B Minor
on the piano endlessly, and every time she came to this one dramatic
part, she would screw it up really badly and yell "FUCK!" in
frustration. Then she would start from the beginning and do the whole
thing again. This went on for several months. Ever since that time,
whenever the lecturer was within earshot of the Brahms Rhapsody and that
difficult part came up, in her mind's ear she heard her roommate yelling
"FUCK!"
She said she can't listen to that piece anymore.
My late wife's favorite song was Gershwins' Love Walked In, and some of the lyrics played a major role in our first romantic encounter. Since her passing 6 years ago, I haven't played any recording of that song. When I inadvertently hear it elsewhere, I instantly get tears in my eyes.
Mort Linder
You may have ruined that song for me, Mort, but that's OK.
We have old, old friends who lost two daughters to cancer,
10 years apart at ages 31 and 40. Both beautiful, gifted,
accomplished, with young children. We are out of touch with
them, and only found about about the second one, who died
three years ago, a couple of weeks ago, purely by accident.
How to explain the grief I am feeling? I don't know.

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