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Tchaikovsky VC - CD from hell?
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s***@nycap.rr.com
2017-06-10 13:44:34 UTC
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Has anyone here heard the Kopatchinskaja/Currentzis recording of the Tchaikovsky violin concerto? Classics Today calls it a CD from hell. American Record Guide says this:

TCHAIKOVSKY: Violin Concerto; STRAVINSKY: The Wedding Patricia Kopatchinskaja, v; Nadine Koutcher, s; Natalya Buklaga, mz; Stanislav Leontieff, t; Vasily Korostelev, b; MusicAeterna/ Teodor Currentzis

Sony 16512--57 minutes

I feel like I walked in on something in darkest hour of night that I wasn't meant to see. A violinist, most assuredly a woman, is mumbling something under her breath, raspy, on chewy gut strings, playing to herself. There is a hushed orchestra, doing its all so I may hear her speak, inviting me to lean in closer. In time she stops hiding, lifts her voice, grows more confident and extroverted, and in the end shreds her way through the finale, demonic and wild, intonation be damned. Her high notes are sometimes flat, intentionally--an affectation borrowed from pop-music vocal stylings--and her cadenza glissandos slide past the last written note sharp, a bit unhinged. Orchestra, also on gut strings, and conductor are unapologetic co-conspirators to this possible criminal trespass against Tchaikovsky's warhorse, their culpability mitigated by a confession of late-night sleep deprivation and its attendant manic-depressive mood swings, liquid flights of inspiration, and inevitable lapses of judgement. You, like me, may think they deserve clemency, or you might want them locked up for good. But one thing you won't do is stop the CD player--you'll either love it or love to hate it until the end. Ms Kopatchinskaja and Mr Currentzis have stamped an unforgettable and indelible mark on this work.

After the harrowing finale of the concerto, Stravinsky's Wedding sounds positively mellow--and how often can you say that about this nerve-jangling work? This recording quite blows away the only other one I've heard, Bernstein and the English Bach Festival Chorus and Percussion Ensemble from 1977 (DG 423 251). The English are too reserved for such earthy, elemental ritualism--oh what a difference a Russian makes! All the singers are Slavic--and Stravinsky said this work can only be understood by Russian speakers. I don't know if I understand it as Stravinsky understood it, but I've always been deeply moved by The Wedding. This performance is very soulful, fierce and colorful, the low bass percussion hitting with especially resounding and rotund force.

Sony made a crucial mistake, though, with their otherwise very useful and perceptive booklet: there's no libretto. It's nearly impossible to follow the rapid-fire vocals, but it's important to understand generally what everyone's singing about. Synopses can be found on the internet, but only the original text conveys its frenzied, rustic flavor.

This is an essential disc that demands a hearing by every music lover. Bravo!

Wright
MiNe109
2017-06-10 14:54:10 UTC
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Post by s***@nycap.rr.com
Has anyone here heard the Kopatchinskaja/Currentzis recording of the
Tchaikovsky violin concerto? Classics Today calls it a CD from hell.
TCHAIKOVSKY: Violin Concerto; STRAVINSKY: The Wedding Patricia
Kopatchinskaja, v; Nadine Koutcher, s; Natalya Buklaga, mz;
Stanislav Leontieff, t; Vasily Korostelev, b; MusicAeterna/ Teodor
Currentzis
Sony 16512--57 minutes
<snip>
Post by s***@nycap.rr.com
Sony made a crucial mistake, though, with their otherwise very
useful and perceptive booklet: there's no libretto. It's nearly
impossible to follow the rapid-fire vocals, but it's important to
understand generally what everyone's singing about. Synopses can be
found on the internet, but only the original text conveys its
frenzied, rustic flavor.
This is an essential disc that demands a hearing by every music lover. Bravo!
Wright
It seems I'm more accustomed to seeing it referred to as 'Les Noces.'
The score is available on imslp for US residents which might help that
libretto problem.

If the gut strings imply an originalist approach, how about a pianola in
Stravinsky?

I'm intrigued but the Amazon price is a bit much and it's not on spotify
where she is otherwise well-represented.

Stephen
MiNe109
2017-06-10 15:28:52 UTC
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Post by MiNe109
I'm intrigued but the Amazon price is a bit much and it's not on spotify
where she is otherwise well-represented.
Found it on spotify searching for 'Les Noces': the concerto openng is
certainly rhapsodic!

Stephen
Frank Lekens
2017-06-10 18:28:38 UTC
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Post by MiNe109
Post by MiNe109
I'm intrigued but the Amazon price is a bit much and it's not on spotify
where she is otherwise well-represented.
Found it on spotify searching for 'Les Noces': the concerto openng is
certainly rhapsodic!
Stephen
Thanks for the tip. Weird, the only performer catalogued for it in
Spotify is Currentzis (another way to find it, presumably).

It's certainly different!
--
Frank Lekens

http://fmlekens.home.xs4all.nl/
boombox
2017-06-10 14:58:50 UTC
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Post by s***@nycap.rr.com
TCHAIKOVSKY: Violin Concerto; STRAVINSKY: The Wedding Patricia Kopatchinskaja, v; Nadine Koutcher, s; Natalya Buklaga, mz; Stanislav Leontieff, t; Vasily Korostelev, b; MusicAeterna/ Teodor Currentzis
Sony 16512--57 minutes
I feel like I walked in on something in darkest hour of night that I wasn't meant to see. A violinist, most assuredly a woman, is mumbling something under her breath, raspy, on chewy gut strings, playing to herself. There is a hushed orchestra, doing its all so I may hear her speak, inviting me to lean in closer. In time she stops hiding, lifts her voice, grows more confident and extroverted, and in the end shreds her way through the finale, demonic and wild, intonation be damned. Her high notes are sometimes flat, intentionally--an affectation borrowed from pop-music vocal stylings--and her cadenza glissandos slide past the last written note sharp, a bit unhinged. Orchestra, also on gut strings, and conductor are unapologetic co-conspirators to this possible criminal trespass against Tchaikovsky's warhorse, their culpability mitigated by a confession of late-night sleep deprivation and its attendant manic-depressive mood swings, liquid flights of inspiration, and inevitable lapses of judgement. You, like me, may think they deserve clemency, or you might want them locked up for good. But one thing you won't do is stop the CD player--you'll either love it or love to hate it until the end. Ms Kopatchinskaja and Mr Currentzis have stamped an unforgettable and indelible mark on this work.
After the harrowing finale of the concerto, Stravinsky's Wedding sounds positively mellow--and how often can you say that about this nerve-jangling work? This recording quite blows away the only other one I've heard, Bernstein and the English Bach Festival Chorus and Percussion Ensemble from 1977 (DG 423 251). The English are too reserved for such earthy, elemental ritualism--oh what a difference a Russian makes! All the singers are Slavic--and Stravinsky said this work can only be understood by Russian speakers. I don't know if I understand it as Stravinsky understood it, but I've always been deeply moved by The Wedding. This performance is very soulful, fierce and colorful, the low bass percussion hitting with especially resounding and rotund force.
Sony made a crucial mistake, though, with their otherwise very useful and perceptive booklet: there's no libretto. It's nearly impossible to follow the rapid-fire vocals, but it's important to understand generally what everyone's singing about. Synopses can be found on the internet, but only the original text conveys its frenzied, rustic flavor.
This is an essential disc that demands a hearing by every music lover. Bravo!
Wright
Coming from that source, it is a badge of honor. Frankly, I bought the CD for the Les Noces, but found the VC quite involving. It's not a piece I've ever really loved, but hearing Currentzis and Kopatchinskaya do their method-acting craziness with it helped me love it a bit more.
Matthew Silverstein
2017-06-10 16:20:33 UTC
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Post by s***@nycap.rr.com
Has anyone here heard the Kopatchinskaja/Currentzis recording of the
Tchaikovsky violin concerto?
Yes. I quite like it. This is unlikely to be the first recording I reach for when I'm in the mood to hear this piece, but it's beautifully and bracingly different.

Matty
n***@gmail.com
2017-06-11 15:48:57 UTC
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Post by Matthew Silverstein
Post by s***@nycap.rr.com
Has anyone here heard the Kopatchinskaja/Currentzis recording of the
Tchaikovsky violin concerto?
Yes. I quite like it. This is unlikely to be the first recording I reach for when I'm in the mood to hear this piece, but it's beautifully and bracingly different.
Matty
I have that PIT CD and enjoy listening to it, as well as her disc of the Beethoven concerto.
https://www.amazon.com/Complete-Violin-Orchestra-Ludwig-Beethoven/dp/B0029XIWC4/ref=sr_1_2?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1497195484&sr=1-2&keywords=Kopatchinskaja+beethoven

Both concertos easily make onto a CD-R, so that they are among my favorite listens when driving, (as well my home system).
Terry
2017-06-11 16:49:32 UTC
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Post by Matthew Silverstein
Post by s***@nycap.rr.com
Has anyone here heard the Kopatchinskaja/Currentzis recording of the
Tchaikovsky violin concerto?
Yes. I quite like it. This is unlikely to be the first recording I reach for when I'm in the mood to hear this piece, but it's beautifully and bracingly different.
Matty
I went over to Presto Classical and listened to some short extracts. I rather liked the performances. I must say that Sony certainly are giving very short measure in their Teodor Currentzis CDs. This is one of the better ones at 57 minutes, but for the Rite of Spring, that's all you get -- 34 minutes. Very exciting 34 minutes, though.
Bozo
2017-06-10 18:12:27 UTC
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Has anyone here heard the Kopatchinskaja/Currentzis recording of the Tchaikovsky violin concerto? >Classics Today calls it a CD from hell.
Not yet , but thanks, and will hear soon, good timing since it's to be hot as hell here today ( high 95F.=35C.):


s***@nycap.rr.com
2017-06-10 20:18:24 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Has anyone here heard the Kopatchinskaja/Currentzis recording of the Tchaikovsky violin concerto? >Classics Today calls it a CD from hell.
http://youtu.be/Kbdy5Ldeo70
Thanks for the link. It sounds very interesting. A little fast in spots and still moving and tender in other spots. If I heard this playing at a concert I'd be very happy.

MIFrost
Bozo
2017-06-10 20:52:58 UTC
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Post by s***@nycap.rr.com
If I heard this playing at a concert I'd be very happy.
Agreed, I thought was a great reading of a work I have not heard for years, probably would not have for several more years but for your OP here. Sure knocked any and all sugar plums out of the score.

And now I'm about to hear Hsu play the PIT Pico # 1 at the Cliburn. Risking a PIT over-dose, but for this VC.
AB
2017-06-12 00:30:31 UTC
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I feel like I walked in on something in darkest hour of night that I wasn't meant to see. A violinist, most assuredly a woman, is mumbling something under her breath, raspy, on chewy gut strings, playing to herself. There is a hushed orchestra, doing its all so I may hear her speak, inviting me to lean in closer. In time she stops hiding, lifts her voice, grows more confident and extroverted, and in the end shreds her way through the finale, demonic and wild, intonation be damned. Her high notes are sometimes flat, intentionally--an affectation borrowed from pop-music vocal stylings--and her cadenza glissandos slide past the last written note sharp, a bit unhinged. Orchestra, also on gut strings, and conductor are unapologetic co-conspirators to this possible criminal trespass against Tchaikovsky's warhorse, their culpability mitigated by a confession of late-night sleep deprivation and its attendant manic-depressive mood swings, liquid flights of inspiration, and inevitable lapses of judgement. You, like me, may think they deserve clemency, or you might want them locked up for good. But one thing you won't do is stop the CD player--you'll either love it or love to hate it until the end. Ms Kopatchinskaja and Mr Currentzis have stamped an unforgettable and indelible mark on this work.
After the harrowing finale of the concerto, Stravinsky's Wedding sounds positively mellow--and how often can you say that about this nerve-jangling work? This recording quite blows away the only other one I've heard, Bernstein and the English Bach Festival Chorus and Percussion Ensemble from 1977 (DG 423 251). The English are too reserved for such earthy, elemental ritualism--oh what a difference a Russian makes! All the singers are Slavic--and Stravinsky said this work can only be understood by Russian speakers. I don't know if I understand it as Stravinsky understood it, but I've always been deeply moved by The Wedding. This performance is very soulful, fierce and colorful, the low bass percussion hitting with especially resounding and rotund force.
Sony made a crucial mistake, though, with their otherwise very useful and perceptive booklet: there's no libretto. It's nearly impossible to follow the rapid-fire vocals, but it's important to understand generally what everyone's singing about. Synopses can be found on the internet, but only the original text conveys its frenzied, rustic flavor.
This is an essential disc that demands a hearing by every music lover. Bravo!
Wright
listening to a live Tzigane.... for me the playing is basically unacceptable. The technique is erratic. The musicality does not make any sense to me. Not sure if i want to hear more.

AB
Bozo
2017-07-14 13:01:44 UTC
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Here Kopatchinskaja is live recently in the Sibelius Concerto, intense as expected , especially final mov., some intonation issues, but as is my fav VC would not want to have missed it :

https://www.rtbf.be/auvio/detail_lunch-concert?id=2234698

BBC Symphony / Oramo, June 24,2017.
Bozo
2017-07-14 18:11:43 UTC
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Post by Bozo
Here Kopatchinskaja is live recently in the Sibelius Concerto, intense as expected
Not sure Sibelius intended the violin part in the first mov. to sound quite so fragmented, almost as a series of mini-caprices, nor did I realize SIbelius had as much gypsy blood as the final mov. here suggests, but I'll defer to her ear-catching interpretation.
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