Discussion:
Aaron Copland - essential works+recordings?
(too old to reply)
Andy Evans
2018-07-28 11:31:25 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Can you guys recommend some essential works+recordings of Aaron Copland for those that are relatively unfamiliar with his output?
Bozo
2018-07-28 12:56:38 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
>On Saturday, July 28, 2018 at 6:31:28 AM UTC-5, Andy Evans wrote:
> Can you guys recommend some essential works+recordings of Aaron Copland for those that are relatively >unfamiliar with his output?

http://tinyurl.com/y9xtpms2

http://tinyurl.com/yd9lvsol

http://tinyurl.com/yay4cudd
MIFrost
2018-07-28 13:30:56 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Saturday, July 28, 2018 at 7:31:28 AM UTC-4, Andy Evans wrote:
> Can you guys recommend some essential works+recordings of Aaron Copland for those that are relatively unfamiliar with his output?

These are some of my favorites:

https://www.amazon.com/Copland-Appalachian-Orpheus-Chamber-Orchestra/dp/B00LWJ5XTG

https://www.amazon.com/Bernstein-Century-Copland-Appalachian-Spring/dp/B0000029XG

https://www.amazon.com/Copland-Celebration-Vol-I/dp/B000050HWS/ref=sr_1_3?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1532784531&sr=1-3&keywords=a+copland+celebration

MIFrost
Raymond Hall
2018-07-28 15:17:37 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Two CDs:-

RCA Living Stereo - Appalachian Spring/Tender Land (Copland/Copland) + Fall River Legend/Latin American Symphonette (Gould/Gould).

Naxos - Rodeo, Red Pony suite, Prairie Journal, Letter Home (Falletta/Buffalo). Nobody else captures the drunken scene in Rodeo more hilariously than Falletta.

The above 2 discs cover a sizeable chunk of Copland's works. There is Lenny of course, but he wasn't the only conductor.

Ray Hall, Taree
HT
2018-07-28 16:03:00 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Copland can be very easy to listen to.

Appalachian Spring:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e-g7ar61T9A

Blues:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dYh5noBORwQ

Concerto for clarinet and string orchestra:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9GnJBLwOjFo

Henk
g***@gmail.com
2018-07-28 17:34:38 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Saturday, July 28, 2018 at 1:31:28 AM UTC-10, Andy Evans wrote:
> Can you guys recommend some essential works+recordings of Aaron Copland for those that are relatively unfamiliar with his output?

Concerning A. SPRING, the following 2005 review article may be of interest:

http://www.classicalnotes.net/classics/appalachian.html
Andy Evans
2018-07-28 18:55:16 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Thanks for the recommendations - keep them coming!

I listened right through to The Tender Land and enjoyed it - BBC/Slatkin. I am less keen on Bernstain - not a conductor I warm to. I prefer less vigorous and more contemplative approaches. I like what I've heard of Copland himself conducting his works. I haven't got far beyond A.Spring and Quiet Town yet, but like these works....
MIFrost
2018-07-28 19:01:12 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Saturday, July 28, 2018 at 2:55:19 PM UTC-4, Andy Evans wrote:
> Thanks for the recommendations - keep them coming!
>
> I listened right through to The Tender Land and enjoyed it - BBC/Slatkin. I am less keen on Bernstain - not a conductor I warm to. I prefer less vigorous and more contemplative approaches. I like what I've heard of Copland himself conducting his works. I haven't got far beyond A.Spring and Quiet Town yet, but like these works....

I can find no satisfactory recording of A Lincoln Portrait. No one I've ever heard narrates it to my satisfaction. The best one I recall was a concert I attended years ago of the Philadelphia Orchestra with Marian Anderson narrating.

MIFrost
JohnA
2018-07-28 19:27:50 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Saturday, July 28, 2018 at 2:01:14 PM UTC-5, MIFrost wrote:

> I can find no satisfactory recording of A Lincoln Portrait. No one I've ever heard narrates it to my satisfaction. The best one I recall was a concert I attended years ago of the Philadelphia Orchestra with Marian Anderson narrating.
>
> MIFrost

Here's Copland's recording of the Lincoln Portrait with Henry Fonda's narration removed:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kiWZhNhLRTw
Dennman6
2018-07-29 16:22:17 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
I still have and listen to a large portion of classical music on LPs. And as regards Copeland and Lincoln Portrait I have recordings narrated by Henry Fonda, Katharine Hepburn, Adlai Stevenson, and Carl Sandburg. To my sensibilities Carl Sandburg as narrator was an obvious and very satisfying touch of genius, and I loved hearing him in it. There may be other narrators that I haven't yet heard that I might like as much as Sandberg. I haven't really researched any further recordings and narrators of the piece. I suppose I should do that, as I have done with one of my other favorite pieces, Peter and the Wolf. I am almost always amused by the variations in narrators in that famous piece. However, the worst narrator of Peter and the the Wolf I have ever heard was by Captain Kangaroo, and that pains me because I loved that show and that man when I was a kid. Another dead-in-the-water narration of Peter and the Wolf was by Brandon DeWilde, but I digress...
boombox
2018-07-29 21:11:33 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sunday, July 29, 2018 at 12:22:19 PM UTC-4, Dennman6 wrote:
> I still have and listen to a large portion of classical music on LPs. And as regards Copeland and Lincoln Portrait I have recordings narrated by Henry Fonda, Katharine Hepburn, Adlai Stevenson, and Carl Sandburg. To my sensibilities Carl Sandburg as narrator was an obvious and very satisfying touch of genius, and I loved hearing him in it. There may be other narrators that I haven't yet heard that I might like as much as Sandberg. I haven't really researched any further recordings and narrators of the piece. I suppose I should do that, as I have done with one of my other favorite pieces, Peter and the Wolf. I am almost always amused by the variations in narrators in that famous piece. However, the worst narrator of Peter and the the Wolf I have ever heard was by Captain Kangaroo, and that pains me because I loved that show and that man when I was a kid. Another dead-in-the-water narration of Peter and the Wolf was by Brandon DeWilde, but I digress...

Yes! I've heard the majority of them and Sandburg's "plain" demeanor carries the day. It's also what Copland said he wanted. There's a funny clip of Copland speaking the part (plainly) in rehearsal with Bernstein conducting and Lenny shouting over him in his grandest manner SHALL...NOT...PERISH...FROM THE EARTH!!!!!
m***@gmail.com
2018-07-30 05:08:15 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sunday, July 29, 2018 at 12:22:19 PM UTC-4, Dennman6 wrote:
> I still have and listen to a large portion of classical music on LPs. And as regards Copeland and Lincoln Portrait I have recordings narrated by Henry Fonda, Katharine Hepburn, Adlai Stevenson, and Carl Sandburg. To my sensibilities Carl Sandburg as narrator was an obvious and very satisfying touch of genius, and I loved hearing him in it. There may be other narrators that I haven't yet heard that I might like as much as Sandberg. I haven't really researched any further recordings and narrators of the piece. I suppose I should do that, as I have done with one of my other favorite pieces, Peter and the Wolf. I am almost always amused by the variations in narrators in that famous piece. However, the worst narrator of Peter and the the Wolf I have ever heard was by Captain Kangaroo, and that pains me because I loved that show and that man when I was a kid. Another dead-in-the-water narration of Peter and the Wolf was by Brandon DeWilde, but I digress...

My fav narrator by far is Boris Karloff - no wonder kids loved him
Arno Schuh
2018-07-30 09:50:23 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Dennman6 <***@aol.com> wrote:
> I still have and listen to a large portion of classical music on LPs.
> And as regards Copeland and Lincoln Portrait I have recordings
> narrated by Henry Fonda, Katharine Hepburn, Adlai Stevenson, and Carl
> Sandburg. To my sensibilities Carl Sandburg as narrator was an
> obvious and very satisfying touch of genius, and I loved hearing him

With Gregory Peck. It was the first one I listened to. Impressed me.
First Fanfare for the common man was with LA SO, Zubin Mehta. Sounds better
on LP as the reissue on CD.
And i Love the 3th Symphony conducted by the composer himself. It includes
the Fanfare motive.

Arno
Arno Schuh
2018-07-30 12:51:21 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Arno Schuh <***@in-trier.de> wrote:

> With Gregory Peck. It was the first one I listened to. Impressed me.
> First Fanfare for the common man was with LA SO, Zubin Mehta.

Sorry LA PO and Zubin Mehta. The Lincoln Portrait with Gregory Peck also was
with the LA PO and Mehta.

My faible for Peter and the Wolf are to collect it in as many languages to
get my fingers on.
Reaches from Chinese (Mandarin and Kanton) down to a Luxemburgian version
from across the border.

Arno
Frank Berger
2018-07-30 13:52:15 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 7/30/2018 8:51 AM, Arno Schuh wrote:
> Arno Schuh <***@in-trier.de> wrote:
>
>> With Gregory Peck. It was the first one I listened to. Impressed me.
>> First Fanfare for the common man was with LA SO, Zubin Mehta.
>
> Sorry LA PO and Zubin Mehta. The Lincoln Portrait with Gregory Peck also
> was with the LA PO and Mehta.
>
> My faible for Peter and the Wolf are to collect it in as many languages
> to get my fingers on.
> Reaches from Chinese (Mandarin and Kanton) down to a Luxemburgian
> version from across the border.
>
> Arno

Just listened to a bunch. I thought Carl Sandburg's diction was odd,
Henry Fonda was a little flat, Gregory Peck was great (what a voice)..
So was Katherine Hepburn, but she her voice was quite shaky. Maya
Angelou did nothing for me. You have to avoid sounding pretentious or
overly theatrical, which James Earl Jones didn't. I liked Adlai
Stevenson. Would have liked to hear Ronald Reagan in this. Lots of
democratic politicians recorded; didn't see any republicans. That's
interesting. I suppose because the music industry is liberal so they
invite liberals????
boombox
2018-07-30 22:04:42 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Monday, July 30, 2018 at 9:52:23 AM UTC-4, Frank Berger wrote:


>
> Just listened to a bunch. I thought Carl Sandburg's diction was odd,
> Henry Fonda was a little flat, Gregory Peck was great (what a voice)..
> So was Katherine Hepburn, but she her voice was quite shaky. Maya
> Angelou did nothing for me. You have to avoid sounding pretentious or
> overly theatrical, which James Earl Jones didn't. I liked Adlai
> Stevenson. Would have liked to hear Ronald Reagan in this. Lots of
> democratic politicians recorded; didn't see any republicans. That's
> interesting. I suppose because the music industry is liberal so they
> invite liberals????

Sandburg had traces of a Swedish accent throughout his life. If you want a conservative, there's one by Maggie Thatcher.
Frank Berger
2018-07-30 22:41:12 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 7/30/2018 6:04 PM, boombox wrote:
> On Monday, July 30, 2018 at 9:52:23 AM UTC-4, Frank Berger wrote:
>
>
>>
>> Just listened to a bunch. I thought Carl Sandburg's diction was odd,
>> Henry Fonda was a little flat, Gregory Peck was great (what a voice)..
>> So was Katherine Hepburn, but she her voice was quite shaky. Maya
>> Angelou did nothing for me. You have to avoid sounding pretentious or
>> overly theatrical, which James Earl Jones didn't. I liked Adlai
>> Stevenson. Would have liked to hear Ronald Reagan in this. Lots of
>> democratic politicians recorded; didn't see any republicans. That's
>> interesting. I suppose because the music industry is liberal so they
>> invite liberals????
>
> Sandburg had traces of a Swedish accent throughout his life. If you want a conservative, there's one by Maggie Thatcher.
>

Found it on Amazon.
Randy Lane
2018-07-29 18:49:53 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Is the misspelling of Lenny's name intentional?
LOL
Frank Berger
2018-07-29 20:24:31 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 7/29/2018 2:49 PM, Randy Lane wrote:
> Is the misspelling of Lenny's name intentional?
> LOL
>

?
Randy Lane
2018-07-29 20:31:07 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
One of yesterday's posts:

Thanks for the recommendations - keep them coming!

I listened right through to The Tender Land and enjoyed it - BBC/Slatkin. I am less keen on Bernstain - not a conductor I warm to. I prefer less vigorous and more contemplative approaches. I like what I've heard of Copland himself conducting his works. I haven't got far beyond A.Spring and Quiet Town yet, but like these works....
Andy Evans
2018-07-29 20:35:53 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sunday, 29 July 2018 21:31:09 UTC+1, Randy Lane wrote:
> One of yesterday's posts:
>
> Thanks for the recommendations - keep them coming!
>
> I listened right through to The Tender Land and enjoyed it - BBC/Slatkin. I am less keen on Bernstain - not a conductor I warm to. I prefer less vigorous and more contemplative approaches. I like what I've heard of Copland himself conducting his works. I haven't got far beyond A.Spring and Quiet Town yet, but like these works....

Ha! Just noticed the Freudian slip. I was unaware at the time. So why did my finger slip...
Frank Berger
2018-07-29 20:48:42 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 7/29/2018 4:35 PM, Andy Evans wrote:
> On Sunday, 29 July 2018 21:31:09 UTC+1, Randy Lane wrote:
>> One of yesterday's posts:
>>
>> Thanks for the recommendations - keep them coming!
>>
>> I listened right through to The Tender Land and enjoyed it - BBC/Slatkin. I am less keen on Bernstain - not a conductor I warm to. I prefer less vigorous and more contemplative approaches.

Not sure that more "contemplative" applies very well to Rodeo and Billy
the KId. They are all about rhythm and action aren't they?

I like what I've heard of Copland himself conducting his works. I
haven't got far beyond A.Spring and Quiet Town yet, but like these works....
>


> Ha! Just noticed the Freudian slip. I was unaware at the time. So why did my finger slip...
>
Andy Evans
2018-07-30 06:21:31 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
I am less keen on Bernstain - not a conductor I warm to. I prefer less vigorous and more contemplative approaches.
>
> Not sure that more "contemplative" applies very well to Rodeo and Billy
> the KId. They are all about rhythm and action aren't they?
>

Good point, of course. Those are not works I expect to listen to very much.
Frank Berger
2018-07-30 06:53:04 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 7/30/2018 2:21 AM, Andy Evans wrote:
> I am less keen on Bernstain - not a conductor I warm to. I prefer less vigorous and more contemplative approaches.
>>
>> Not sure that more "contemplative" applies very well to Rodeo and Billy
>> the KId. They are all about rhythm and action aren't they?
>>
>
> Good point, of course. Those are not works I expect to listen to very much.
>

And they are practically the only Copland I listen to.
g***@gmail.com
2018-07-30 07:02:39 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sunday, July 29, 2018 at 8:21:33 PM UTC-10, Andy Evans wrote:
> I am less keen on Bernstain - not a conductor I warm to. I prefer less vigorous and more contemplative approaches.
> >
> > Not sure that more "contemplative" applies very well to Rodeo and Billy
> > the KId. They are all about rhythm and action aren't they?
> >
>
> Good point, of course. Those are not works I expect to listen to very much.

The following article asks:

- What kind of music will we lose the ability to enjoy next? Could all of the so-called "classical" repertoire be next, simply because it isn't loud, or abrasive, or violent enough to stimulate our atrophied sensibilities?

https://www.stereophile.com/asweseeit/canned_music/index.html
Tassilo
2018-07-28 20:11:41 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Saturday, July 28, 2018 at 7:31:28 AM UTC-4, Andy Evans wrote:
> Can you guys recommend some essential works+recordings of Aaron Copland for those that are relatively unfamiliar with his output?

The Piano Variations (1930) is one of Copland’s most original and adventurous pieces. Around 1950 Copland sent the Piano Variations to Pierre Boulez, who was extremely impressed by it. Later Boulez performed Copland’s Orchestral Variations, Copland’s 1957 orchestration of the Piano Variations, with the New York Philharmonic. Stravinsky was particularly impressed by the Twelve Poems of Emily Dickinson for voice & piano (1950). Of the two big “abstract” pieces for orchestra from the 1960’s, Connotations (1962) and the appropriately more inward Inscape (1967), I vastly prefer the brooding Inscape. (First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy was so shocked by Copland’s apparent departure from the style of Appalachian Spring et al with Connotations that she didn’t quite know what to say to the composer following the premiere on a program to mark the opening of Philharmonic Hall at Lincoln Center.)
Andy Evans
2018-07-28 22:08:21 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Saturday, 28 July 2018 21:11:43 UTC+1, Tassilo wrote:
> On Saturday, July 28, 2018 at 7:31:28 AM UTC-4, Andy Evans wrote:
> > Can you guys recommend some essential works+recordings of Aaron Copland for those that are relatively unfamiliar with his output?
>
> The Piano Variations (1930) is one of Copland’s most original and adventurous pieces. Around 1950 Copland sent the Piano Variations to Pierre Boulez, who was extremely impressed by it. Later Boulez performed Copland’s Orchestral Variations, Copland’s 1957 orchestration of the Piano Variations, with the New York Philharmonic. Stravinsky was particularly impressed by the Twelve Poems of Emily Dickinson for voice & piano (1950). Of the two big “abstract” pieces for orchestra from the 1960’s, Connotations (1962) and the appropriately more inward Inscape (1967), I vastly prefer the brooding Inscape. (First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy was so shocked by Copland’s apparent departure from the style of Appalachian Spring et al with Connotations that she didn’t quite know what to say to the composer following the premiere on a program to mark the opening of Philharmonic Hall at Lincoln Center.)

Interesting post. I listened to Inscape and liked it.
Oscar
2018-07-28 22:24:12 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Vin Scully narrated Lincoln Portrait at Hollywood Bowl last summer. Dudamel conducted.
Frank Berger
2018-07-29 01:59:21 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 7/28/2018 7:31 AM, Andy Evans wrote:
> Can you guys recommend some essential works+recordings of Aaron Copland for those that are relatively unfamiliar with his output?
>

My favorite Copland recordings are Rodeo and Billy the Kid by Bernstein
from 1959-1960. My parents had the record which I bought when I left
home. I've alway thought it was spectacular sounding. When these came
out on CD they included Appalachian Spring and something else. The
sound seems the same. Try it.
Ed Presson
2018-07-29 02:20:12 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
"Frank Berger" wrote in message
news:N6adnVg22urkgsDGnZ2dnUU7-***@supernews.com...

On 7/28/2018 7:31 AM, Andy Evans wrote:
> Can you guys recommend some essential works+recordings of Aaron Copland
> for those that are relatively unfamiliar with his output?
>

>My favorite Copland recordings are Rodeo and Billy the Kid by Bernstein
>from 1959-1960. My parents had the record which I bought when I left home.
>I've alway thought it was spectacular sounding. When these came out on CD
>they included Appalachian Spring and something else. The sound seems the
>same. Try it.

Even Copland agreed that nobody gave the rhythms in these works more
snap than Bernstein; and then added that he still preferred his own way of
doing these three scores.

I've had both and still prefer Bernstein.

Ed Presson
Andy Evans
2018-07-29 02:25:02 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
> My favorite Copland recordings are Rodeo and Billy the Kid by Bernstein
> from 1959-1960. My parents had the record which I bought when I left
> home. I've alway thought it was spectacular sounding. When these came
> out on CD they included Appalachian Spring and something else. The
> sound seems the same. Try it.

Unfortunately this is the only CD I have of Copland, and when I heard the difference between Lenny conducting these works and Copland himself conducting It was clear to me that Lenny was not the person to open the doors I wish to open. Let's just say I'm temperamentally unsuited to the virtues others see in him.
c***@gmail.com
2018-07-29 17:05:24 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Saturday, July 28, 2018 at 10:25:04 PM UTC-4, Andy Evans wrote:
> > My favorite Copland recordings are Rodeo and Billy the Kid by Bernstein
> > from 1959-1960. My parents had the record which I bought when I left
> > home. I've alway thought it was spectacular sounding. When these came
> > out on CD they included Appalachian Spring and something else. The
> > sound seems the same. Try it.
>
> Unfortunately this is the only CD I have of Copland, and when I heard the difference between Lenny conducting these works and Copland himself conducting It was clear to me that Lenny was not the person to open the doors I wish to open. Let's just say I'm temperamentally unsuited to the virtues others see in him.

Try this: https://www.amazon.com/Copland-Orchestral-Music-Aaron/dp/B00002ZZ5C/. All excellent performances and no Bernstein. Probably op but plenty of cheap copies available. Have you explored any of Copland's chamber of solo piano music?

AC

AC
c***@gmail.com
2018-07-29 17:09:21 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sunday, July 29, 2018 at 1:05:27 PM UTC-4, ***@gmail.com wrote:
> On Saturday, July 28, 2018 at 10:25:04 PM UTC-4, Andy Evans wrote:
> > > My favorite Copland recordings are Rodeo and Billy the Kid by Bernstein
> > > from 1959-1960. My parents had the record which I bought when I left
> > > home. I've alway thought it was spectacular sounding. When these came
> > > out on CD they included Appalachian Spring and something else. The
> > > sound seems the same. Try it.
> >
> > Unfortunately this is the only CD I have of Copland, and when I heard the difference between Lenny conducting these works and Copland himself conducting It was clear to me that Lenny was not the person to open the doors I wish to open. Let's just say I'm temperamentally unsuited to the virtues others see in him.
>
> Try this: https://www.amazon.com/Copland-Orchestral-Music-Aaron/dp/B00002ZZ5C/. All excellent performances and no Bernstein. Probably op but plenty of cheap copies available. Have you explored any of Copland's chamber of solo piano music?
>
> AC
>
> AC

...Copland's chamber OR solo piano music <SIGH>
i***@gmail.com
2018-07-30 05:38:32 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Saturday, July 28, 2018 at 1:31:28 AM UTC-10, Andy Evans wrote:
> Can you guys recommend some essential works+recordings of Aaron Copland for those that are relatively unfamiliar with his output?

According to the following:

- There is an affecting recording of the elderly Copland leading a rehearsal of Appalachian Spring....

https://books.google.com/books?id=OHObaUvYuAUC&pg=PA331&dq=%22There+is+an+affecting+recording+of+the+elderly+Copland%22&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjfyOjKjcbcAhUJi1QKHbkhDIAQ6AEIKTAA#v=onepage&q=%22There%20is%20an%20affecting%20recording%20of%20the%20elderly%20Copland%22&f=false
g***@gmail.com
2018-08-16 20:58:42 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Saturday, July 28, 2018 at 1:31:28 AM UTC-10, Andy Evans wrote:
> Can you guys recommend some essential works+recordings of Aaron Copland for those that are relatively unfamiliar with his output?

Has anyone heard Copland's songs ZIONS WALLS and AT THE RIVER on Verrett's lp of her 1965 Carnegie Hall recital?:

https://www.google.com/search?tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1366&bih=662&ei=W-V1W4vKAbSr0PEPv-q0qAo&q=verret+lp+carnegie+hall&oq=verret+lp+carnegie+hall&gs_l=img.3...871.6504.0.7006.24.10.0.14.0.0.160.1238.0j9.9.0....0...1ac.1.64.img..1.8.1129.0..0j0i30k1j0i5i30k1j0i8i30k1.0.4IVyEpAl5ro#imgrc=L3LBRZXo4-aZOM:
Kerrison
2018-08-17 16:38:17 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Thursday, August 16, 2018 at 9:58:46 PM UTC+1, ***@gmail.com wrote:

> > Can you guys recommend some essential works+recordings of Aaron Copland for those that are relatively unfamiliar with his output?

Does the newly-released US Premiere of Copland's "Short Symphony" from Stokowski and the NBCSO in 1944 count? ...

https://www.pristineclassical.com/products/pasc536
Loading...